Touring Britain

Walks and Guided Walks Map

Postcode / Town or Locate button
Radius:
TitleCategoryAddressDescription
Derwent Edge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.4005012512207,-1.74185001850128 A walk along the rooftop of the Derbyshire Peak District takes you from the Fairholmes visitor centre by Ladybower Reservoir, along the side of Derwent reservoir and a climb to Derwent Edge that runs parallel and about 300m above Derwent and Ladybower Reservoirs. Derwent Edge is one of the string of exposed gritstone escarpments that run from the top of the Derwent Valley all the way to Chatsworth and beyond. This is the Dark Peak of the Peak District and forms a stark contrast to the more gentle, yet no less dramatic, limestone valleys of the White Peak that are far below and to the south of Derwent Edge. What makes Derwent Edge particularly special for me are the rocky tors that are sprinkled along the route. These weathered gritstone outcrops form all manner of wonderful shapes, with equally colourful names - Salt Cellar, Cakes of Bread and Wheelstones. It is difficult and even unfair to select favourites, but the walk along Derwent Edge is truly wonderful. It's a good long walk and high enough that you can feel the air and space around you. Stanage Edge is my personal favourite, but Derwent Edge has a completely different character to it. It is higher, and consequently a little more desolate. It is a little quieter as it takes a bit more effort to get there, and there is simply no comparison with Stanage for climbing, so it's mostly walkers who venture up to Derwent Edge, the tors here being more suitable for standing on and admiring the view or maybe a little bouldering; no serious climbing here. It is not as easy to get to as Stanage and takes somewhat longer to walk up; it is not a quick late afternoon or evening stop-off for a quick walk or climb after walk; it's a bit more serious than that. Much of the High Peak area is now designated Open Access Land. This means that footpaths do not have to be adhered to. But with such access comes a responsibility to look after the area so appropriate care should always be taken when exploring the area. The National Trust is putting a huge investment into managing the area - footpaths, walls, buildings and moorland but they need our help to maintain the environment so please treat it with respect. It is worth remembering that paths across the High Peak have been here for centuries as packhorse trails taking lead and wool across the hills to cities such as Manchester and Sheffield. Just what would it have been like to hike across these moorlands with primitive mountain and weather proofing gear? The reservoirs far below Derwent Edge were constructed in two phases. The first, from 1901 to 1917 saw the Howden and Derwent Dams completed. It was here during World War II that the 617 Squadron, led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, practiced their raids that would lead to the destructive raid on the German Ruhr valley dams in May 1943. It is still sometimes possible to see preserved Lancaster bombers flying down the Derwent Valley, quite an awesome sight and sound. The third reservoir, Ladybower, was built from 1935 to 1945. It is the latter that meant that the villages of Derwent and Ashopton were flooded although some of the remains of both can occasionally be seen when the reservoir level is particularly low.
Stanage Edge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.342499,-1.610699 The length of Stanage and back again providing a great look at the whole of the Edge and the climbing routes along it. A simple there and back walk, along the top or base of the edge or any combination. It may be a simple and not too strenuous walk, but the views are some of the best in Derbyshire, the views down and across the Derwent Valley being far reaching on a clear day. Do ensure you take appropriate footwear and clothing. The rocks can be slippy when very wet and there's often mud to walk through. Even if it is warm in the valley, there can be a good breeze as you walk along the edge that can make it feel chilly. And in common with anywhere in the Peak District it can start to rain! Stanage Edge is for me the king of the Derbyshire gritstone edges. It has a presence unlike any of the other parts of the Derbyshire Peak District towering above the Hope Valley near Hathersage. It is an almost unbroken four mile line of exposed gritstone cliff that stretches from Moscar Moor and runs south east to Cowper Stone at Burbage End. It has something for everyone - great walking, some of the best climbing (over 850 recognised routes) and bouldering in Britain, fantastic and far reaching views down the Derwent Valley, easy access by road (so no long climbs to the top from Hathersage in the valley below), lots of natural history to see and so on. But with magnificence and relatively easy access comes popularity. On a good weekend, when the weather is mild, not raining and there's no major football match, cars are parked along every stretch of road and there's so many people climbing that the cacophony of carabiners is the only sound you will hear! But find a day when you can be on your own or in relatively small numbers the area is just sublime. In his 1946 book "The Backbone of England", W.A Poucher describes the gritstone Edges as being "like the long broken battlements of an old fortress", a description that I think paints an excellent picture. He continues: "...and Stanage Edge is probably the most beautiful of them all. Here the moorland plateau suddenly ends and a line of supporting precipitous gritstone cliffs, up to 100 feet high, separates it from the first declivities of the valley which sink down gently to the woods fringing the river that threads its floor." I couldn't find better prose to describe Stanage. There are plenty of remains of earlier industry and activities all along the escarpment and below on the moors. Abandoned millstones, some clearly close to completion, litter the moors immediately below the cliff. These are more concentrated near Burbage End and near High Neb. There are also the numbered drinking wells carved into the gritstone along the ridge at the behest of gamekeepers. These were to allow grouse to drink rainwater. From almost anywhere on the ridge, the views are just great. At the northern end you can see over Winhill, Lose Hill and the Great Ridge to Mam Tor and Kinder Scout. In the middle you can look down into the Hope Valley and Hathersage, and at the southern end the view down the Derwent Valley to Chatsworth is great. Stanage Edge provides a great choice of walking. You can start at either end and walk to the opposite end and back again. You can start in the middle and do a round trip, or you can combine this with a longer walk that touches other parts, equally worthy of a visit!
Birchen Edge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.2461013793945,-1.5813000202179 A relatively easy walk with relatively little steep uphill involved but one that still delivers excellent views, visits three gritstone edges and a good tour of several Peak District features - Nelson's Monument, the Three Ships and Eagle Stone. Birchen Edge is another gem of a gritstone edge, but I admit I have an affection for all of them and will wax lyrical about each and every part. Birchen Edge stands above the Robin Hood public house on the A619 Baslow to Chesterfield road. Gardom's Edge is a more subtle structure surrounded in woodland below Birchen Edge and towards Baslow. The views from Birchen Edge across the Derwent Valley are wide and far. The rewards far exceed the effort needed to see them as the route up Birchen Edge is a stroll and involves little ascent, so a good one for those who want a great view with little effort! The rock formation along the top known as the "Three Ships" after their names carved onto them are good for scrambling or climbing. These three pieces of exposed and weathered gritstone are named after three ships in Lord Nelson's fleet - "Royal Soverin" (yes, that's how it is carved in the rock), "Defiant" and "Victory". There's also Nelson's Monument which was erected on the top of Birchen Edge to commemorate the great Admiral after his death in 1805. It should be noted that this monument was erected decades before the column in London's Trafalgar Square! It will come as no surprise that many of the climbing routes along Birchen Edge have related names - Nautical Crack, Mast Gulley, Half Nelson, Trafalgar Wall and so on. On Baslow Edge there is Wellington's Monument, dedicated to the Duke of Wellington and his victory at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. This was erected by E.M. Wrench in 1866 who wanted to provide some balance with Nelson's Monument on the nearby Birchen Edge. Eagle Stone is a well weathered block of gritstone standing towards the eastern end of Baslow Edge. This appears to be steeped in local folklore, the most oft quoted example being that local men had to climb this to demonstrate their prowess before they could be eligible to marry.
Burbage Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.3179016113281,-1.60198998451233 The Burbage Valley is surrounded by the long exposed gritstone of Burbage Edge the two peaks of Carl Wark and Higger Tor. It starts at Longshaw, the hunting lodge built in the 1830s for the Duke of Rutland to entertain parties of visitors as they bagged their grouse from the nearby moorland, and runs round the valley to provide and good round trip back to Longshaw. The Longshaw Estate is now owned by the National Trust and has a small visitor centre, shop and tearoom or, just over the main A6187 Hathersage to Sheffield Road there's the Fox House Inn for those who prefer stronger sustenance. The valley has much history which can be felt when walking round, although it's much harder to see now. But you will see millstones that have long since been abandoned and what appears to have been a hillfort on Carl Wark. A walk through the Burbage Valley could take the easy route that runs along the track through the valley. This track is known as Duke's Drive, presumably for the Duke of Rutland to transport his guests to shoot grouse on the surrounding moorland. This track is part of the Sheffield Country Walk and within the valley is almost flat and easily accessible for pushchairs and those who do not want (or are unable) to take the rather rockier path that this walk describes.
Southwold Harbour Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.3229846428,1.67746604112 A walk that should be taken in the early morning just after sunrise or just before sunset to witness the beautiful light in this part of Suffolk. This walk runs from the town centre, along the harbour road and round marshland to return to Southwold where a fine pint of Adnams should be compulsory refreshment and reward. This is an easy walk on flat ground and takes an hour or so depending on how long you watch the harbour, look at the sunset or of course how long you spend in the pub! Southwold has always been a popular seaside town for writers and artists or just to relax. The local brewery, Adnams, is still in the town and some fishing still goes on, but tourism is by far the largest contributor to the local economy. It has also become more popular in the last decade or so and in consequence prices have risen ; the house prices are now very high and so many of the houses are now holiday cottages. There's art, music, drama, literature, good food and wine, almost everything that a holiday needs! But there are also some excellent walks along the coats and into the marshland nearby. Once you have left the town the noise starts to disappear and quiet becomes the norm; there are many wonderful paths around and a walk is a welcome break from the busy town. This walk starts in the town and along the seafront where you can see the pier and the much photographed and now iconic beachhuts. Then along the beach to the Harbour (still used by fishing boats), briefly touching the marshes and then back through the town. The Suffolk marshes are a haven for wildlife and many birds feed in the area. It is important not to disturb them - be aware that you may see and find many birds during this walk. Please take great care not to disturb and, if necessary, take a detour. The light at sunrise or sunset at this part of the coast takes on a unique character and walking at that time of day makes this walk so much more special. You will see why artists love this light.
Padley Gorge and Longshaw Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.30524,-1.624649 Imagine a bubbling brook finding its way down through a deep gorge lined with ancient trees. Burbage Brook starts on the high moorland near Stanage Edge, runs through the Burbage Valley below Higger Tor and Carl Wark then passes under the A6187 Hathersage Road and through Lawrence Field adjacent to the National Trust Longshaw Estate. It then runs downhill through Padley Gorge to Grindleford where it joins the River Derwent. Padley Gorge is a deep valley lined both sides with ancient woodland including oak, beech, birch and alder. Birdlife is plentiful and includes woodpeckers, flycatchers, dippers and plenty more. Its a beautiful place at almost any time of year, especially in autumn when the colours of the beech trees starting to fade are at their best. This walk starts at Grindleford station and up through the woods and over part of the Longshaw Estate. Then over to Lawrence Field and down through the delights of Padley Gorge. The views within Padley Gorge are intimate rather than large expanses given its situation. A bright sunny day is to be avoided for most photography given the harsh shadows that will be cast through the trees. A clear, overcast but bright autumn day is probably best as it should provide a great combination of autumn leaves and colour, even light and plenty of water in Burbage Brook. The Longshaw Estate is a large area of land now owned and cared for by the National Trust. Whilst it is centred on Longshaw Lodge and nearby land and woods, it also encompasses Padley Gorge, Lawrence Field, White Edge Moor and Hay Wood. The Longshaw Estate has a wide variety of wildlife that is worth trying to see and, if the opportunity arises by joining one of the fairly frequent guided tours that are organised by the National Trust on site. A particularly good one is the Fungal Foray that takes place in late autumn; the variety of fungi is huge and there are many very rare species within the estate. Highly recommended. Many common and less common bird species are to be found, particularly through the wooded Padley Gorge and woods. In May there are always bluebells; my favourite place to see these is in Hay Wood.
The Great Ridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.3460006713867,-1.81540000438689 This walk takes you from the car park on Mam Tor, up to the top and then along the ridge to Lose Hill (5 miles return). There's a bit of up and down but the route stays at a good height above the Hope Valley to the south and the Vale of Edale to the north thereby commanding fantastic views in any direction you look. With good weather the distant views are excellent - from Lose Hill you can get a great view down the Derwent Valley taking in many landmarks. Navigationally this walk is really simple, just follow the ridge to the end and return along the same path. The slope up to Back Tor requires care over the rocks, but the rest is nice and straightforward. The western end of this walk tends to be busy with many people flocking up to the top of Mam Tor or to take off in their hang-gliders. But whilst a popular spot, there's plenty of space. I believe the term "The Great Ridge" was coined by W.A.Poucher and first used in his book "Peak Panorama, Kinder Scout to Dovedale" published in 1946 to describe the "great barrier which rises between Edale and Castleton." It is quite unique in the way it forms a high wall between the two valleys and as Poucher noted in 1946 there's a stone wall that runs along the whole length, although it is rather dilapidated in many places, more so now than when Poucher was strolling these hills over 50 years ago! Just down from the start point are the Blue John caverns and mines, all within a short walk away if interested. The road to or from Castleton has changed over the years. A road used to run up the side of Mam Tor from Castleton, but this has slipped away as parts of Mam Tor have fallen away. Repairs to the road have now stopped and in consequence the route is now via Winnats Pass, an amazing route through a deep limestone gorge. Mam Tor has been referred to as the Shivering Mountain to reflect its crumbling nature. It's not that stable now due to the alternating layers of shale and gritstone. This does however provide a great place for hang gliders. There are few days during the summer months when there are not one or two of the gliders soaring the currents from the mountain slopes. Quite fascinating to watch too. The ridge is criss-crossed by other paths as a quick look at maps and the ridge itself will show. These were originally used by people walking to work from one valley to the other. You can still sometimes see children walking across to or from school, but now it's mostly walkers! But these paths do present great opportunities to extend this walk.
Kinder Scout via Crowden Clough Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.3590715161,-1.84069207051 This route takes in several of the highlights of Kinder Scout - the Woolpacks, Noe Stool and of course Jacob's Ladder (part of the Pennine Way). The views are of course extraordinary once you have gained the height to look across a vast amount of the Peak District from it's highest mountain. On a day with good weather this walk is wonderful as you walk up the path of Crowden Brook and then up to the Kinder Scout plateau. However, on days where there is mist, cloud and rain it's a very different proposition and calls for the correct clothing and navigation to avoid problems.
3 Edges: Derwent, Stanage and Bamford Edges Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.374188,-1.706757 The three "best" gritstone edges in one walk! A fairly stiff but exhilarating walk that takes in Whinstone Lee Tor at the southern end of Derwent Edge, across the moors to Stanage Edge and from there to Bamford Edge where there are what I believe to be the best views possible in the Derbyshire Peak District. That assumes the weather is good! This circular route starts at the layby at Ashopton on the A57, but do note that at weekends this can get very busy so best to arrive early. The particular attraction for this walk is that it touches three of the gritstone escarpments that run right across the Peak District and mark the boundary between the more southern and gentle White Peak and the higher moorlands of the Dark Peak. The views from each are terrific and include what I rate as the best view in Derbyshire, that from Bamford Edge overlooking Ladybower Reservoir, Win Hill and the Upper Derwent Valley. It is a fairly strenuous walk, certainly compared to many others in the Peak District, but is easily navigable. Indeed, much of the route is easy to see from almost anywhere on the walk! The hardest bit to find is the path, what there is of it, that runs across the moor from Stanage to Bamford Edge. This is easier to locate in the winter, but tends to be quite boggy, so be sure to be appropriately dressed and do not wear trainers. They will get wet!
Win Hill from Heatherdene Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.3688011169434,-1.69718003273009 At 462m above sea level, the views from Win Hill are tremendous and, given it stands more or less on its own, panoramic. The views start in the north looking over Ladybower Reservoir and up the Upper Derwent Valley to Derwent Edge, Stanage Edge, the Derwent Valley, the Great Ridge and Mam Tor and of course Kinder Scout. There are many walks and well marked paths in the area looked after by Severn Trent Water and the uplands are Open Access land, but this route is one of the longer ones that runs up Win Hill to get the views quickly, then down the far side and around the plantations before dropping down to the track that runs along the bank of Ladybower Reservoir. The views do not stop though as there are once again great views of Derwent Edge from the track alongside the reservoir. This route takes about 4 hours including a stop on the top of Win Hill, essential for refreshments and a gawp at the surrounding views! Much of the area followed by this route is over land managed by Severn Trent Water, whose main priority here is the reservoirs that are used to store drinking water and manage the river flow in the Derwent. Water is also used for drinking water supplies and passes along a 28 mile aqueduct to Ambergate and eventually to Derby and Leicester. The reservoirs here were constructed in two phases, the first from 1901 to 1917 which saw the Howden and Derwent Dams completed. It was here during World War II that the 617 Squadron, led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, practiced their raids that would lead to the destructive raid on the German Ruhr valley dams in May 1943. It is still sometimes possible to see preserved Lancaster bombers flying down the Derwent Valley, quite an awesome sight and sound. The third reservoir, Ladybower, was built from 1935 to 1945. It is the latter that meant that the villages of Derwent and Ashopton were flooded although some of the remains of both can occasionally be seen when the reservoir level is particularly low. The only parts of Ashopton visible on this route are the houses just above the A57; these can be seen from the path alongside the reservoir towards the end of the walk. The dam itself is a puddle-core design meaning it is not a solid masonry built dam but has a clay core surrounding by earth, concrete and stone. It has apparently sufferred more than 1.5m of settlement since it was constructed necessitating raising the level and reinforcement the down slope. There is, I'm happy to hear, a significant margin built in for future settlement! On the slopes of Win Hill there is a significant amount of managed woodland and there is rarely a time when you do not see logging going on at some point along the route. But once above the trees you enter Open Access Land. A marvellous characteristic of Win Hill is that it is largely open all the way round and not part of another ridge. This does open up the views and from the summit the views are truly breathtaking, quite literally on a windy day!
Whinstone Lee Tor Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.374191,-1.707689 A climb from Ashopton through woodland and open moorland to Whinstone Lee Tor which sits at the southern end of Derwent Edge and provides a great vantage point for views up the Derwent Valley reservoirs, across Ladybower to Crook Hill and Win Hill. This walk is a great way to get up above the reservoirs but without the distance of other walks along Derwent Edge and can be done in about 3 hours (plus stops to admire the view and refreshments). On a fine day the views are tremendous but there can often be cloud over the summit so be prepared to miss the views and just enjoy a fine walk instead! On that topic, do be aware that when you get to the top of the Tor you will not get the shelter of the hillside above Ashopton so the weather can quickly change. Be prepared.
Roseberry Topping Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.5073170234,-1.12121683038 The distinctive shape of Roseberry Topping is clearly visible from a good distance away and whilst not the highest point in the North York Moors, it is much more recognisable. It's 320m above sea level, some 130m lower than the nearby Urra Moor and makes a fine walk on its own or as part of a longer walk in the area. The views from the top are big and broad making it a popular destination. It's quite a steep climb to get to the top but not difficult - the walk here takes the shortest route to the top rather than a more gentle approach, although to reach the very top there is no gentle approach! The walk here takes between 2 and 3 hours. Do note that after rain the paths can be very muddy and slippery, so do take care and you might find walking poles very helpful when descending the very rocky and quite tricky path from the summit. Roseberry Topping has many historical connections. Bronze Age and Iron Age remains have been found on the slopes. Captain Cook was born in 1736 on a farm in the nearby village of Great Ayton and apparently was a favourite destination as a boy. The area was part of a game estate and an old hunting shelter is still on the southern part of the hill. Mining subsidence and geological faults appear to have caused a landslip in 1914 that have resulted in the current shape of the summit. Roseberry Topping is now under the ownership and care of the National Trust.
Southwold - circular via Buss Creek and marshes Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.3308763983,1.68399418818 A walk that takes you completely around the Suffolk coastal town of Southwold to walk through the reedbeds, marshland and the harbour then back to the pubs in the town for a well earned and refreshing brew! Southwold is well known as an idyllic and unspoilt small town on the Suffolk coast. It is home to the Adnams brewery, some fishing and tourism. From Easter all the way through to the following autumn Southwold is full of tourists, some visiting for the day or those staying in one of the many cottages available for rental. Its not exclusively visitors though although house prices have escalated enormously given the demand from those buying second or holiday homes. That said, Southwold retains much of its timeless qualities and peaceful air. It makes a very pleasant place to stay for a day or a week and a good base to explore some of the beautiful Suffolk and coastal landscape nearby.
Southwold to Walberswick via marshes Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.3246876635,1.68054344835 This walk starts anywhere along the sea front in Southwold, up through the harbour and then around the Walberswick village across the nature reserve and through the extensive reedbeds that divide Walberswick village from the sea. The route is more or less flat but has much of interest all the way - the busy harbour, Walberswick nature reserve, woodland, reedbeds, Walberswick village and of course Southwold. The start and end point for this walk is the corner of East Street in Southwold, which just happens to be adjacent to the Lord Nelson pub. Just the place to finish this walk! Parts of this route can get quite muddy, particularly around and through the reedbeds although alternative paths do exist if very wet. Whilst heavy walking boots are not always necessary, do ensure you have good grip and something that will cope with puddles.The reedbeds can also be fairly overgrown in part. You may come across grazing sheep in Walberswick nature reserve so please take particular care with dogs.
Brushfield, River Wye and Monsal Dale Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.2312693343,-1.74678840157 The walk along the River Wye from Litton Mill to Monsal Dale is gorgeous with fine weather and no crowds - this is an area that can get very busy at weekends and bank holidays, but during a spring weekday there are usually very few people about and you'll get the views and the quiet to yourselves. This walk starts at the White Lodge car park just outside Ashford-in-the-Water on the A6 between Bakewell and Buxton. It climbs steeply to Brushfield and through the farms and through High Dale before dropping down rapidly to Litton Mill. Then the walk is flat along the valley alongside the very picturesque River Wye through Millers Dale, Water Cum Jolly Dale and along part of the Monsal Trail to the viaduct at Monsal Head and back through Monsal Dale to the car park. It is not a difficult walk although the initial climb up is quite steep, but once at the top it is straightforward and easy going. You might like to take walking poles to help the descent into Litton though if your knees don't like steep descents. Views are lovely and stunning all the way round so be sure to take your camera. Over the top there is very characteristic Derbyshire Dales countryside of fields and dales marked out as if with a big stick of chalk by numerous dry-stone walls. Down in the dales the views consist of limestone walls and the river flowing through a deep valley. The walk alongside the River Wye through Water-Cum-Jolly often overflows so at best the path can be muddy. In the event of flooding there's an alternative route up the valley side - its not difficult but needs care over the rocks. So ensure you have the right footware. As with almost anywhere in the Peak District, the temperature, wind and weather can be very different in the valley along the river compared to over the tops. So ensure you have appropriate clothing that will keep you warm along the top and can be carried in the valley. This walk will take up to 3.5 to 4 hours.
Southwold to Dunwich Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.3247876635,1.68064344835 This route from Southwold to Dunwich follows the Suffolk Coast and Heaths path for much of its length. It's an easy walk with no gradients to speak of and easy navigation. It follows a route round Walberswick from Southwold, through the Nature Reserve and out onto marshland and reedbeds before following the line between woodland and marshes to get to Dunwich. Dunwich is now a mere shadow of its former self. It was once a landing spot for Scandinavian raiders, it became an important port in medieval times and there were lots of fishing and military boats. It became a significant sized port with town to match. However, in common with much of this coast it was subject to erosion and this is precisely what has happened to Dunwich. Most of the medieval town has simply been washed away - what is left is much more modern and not surprisingly built further back from the coast. The cliffs between Dunwich and Dunwich Heath are still regularly being eroded away and in the years I've visited I can easily remember bits of cliff top that are no longer there. The museum in Dunwich is well worth visiting to see a model of the twon as it might have been.
Ashford, Monsal Dale and Shacklow Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.2248955265,-1.71087784986 On a late spring day this relatively gentle walk comes alive with bird song, lambs, bluebells and the scent of wild garlic! The climbs in this route are not too fierce although the path is steep and rocky heading into Great Shacklow Wood. However the effort is well rewarded as you walk down through the wood - this is a beautiful path and tends to be relatively quiet and peaceful. It is a popular path to Monsal Head as many will stop in Ashford and walk the gentle slope up and admire the views down Upperdale and of Monsal Viaduct, now closed to trains and part of the Monsal Trail. There's a choice of refreshments at Monsal Head. Tea or coffee, ice creams, a restaurant in the hotel and enormous helpings of fabulous food washed down with wonderful beers in the pub. In winter there's a log fire that is sure to warm you through if the beer and food doesn't. Once down into the valley the River Wye twists its way majestically down Monsal Dale before you cross the main A6 road from Bakewell to Buxton and head up the sharp but short climb to Great Shacklow Wood. Once up the slope its a quiet, relaxing and rather wonderful stroll back to Ashford.
Matlock to Bonsall Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.1372377285,-1.55899745559 This walk follows the Limestone Way from Matlock to Bonsall. In this direction it is a good climb out of Matlock and onto the Limestone Way and fields surrounding Masson Hill. The views of Matlock grow greater as you climb up the hill and soon get broader to see across Stanton Moor and towards Chatsworth and beyond to the gritstone edges and High Peak. Although a good climb out of Matlock the gradient eases off once past Geoff's Seat to become a gentle amble across fields until the village of Bonsall comes into view. The path drops down into the village where you get a chance to see just a small part of it - although the most important part (church, well, cross and pub). The route then climbs out of Bonsall to Ember Farm before following the path through the glorious woods and above the Heights of Abraham and Matlock Bath before rejoining the path out of Matlock once again. This walk takes you right past the entrance for the Heights of Abraham. There is no right of way through here so you will need to purchase an entrance ticket if you want to go in before continuing with the walk. This is a country park first opened in 1780 and has a variety of attractions for visitors including refreshments and of course the cable cars that can transport you from just adjacent to the railway station in Matlock Bath to the top and back again. The first part of this walk follows the Limestone Way. This is a long distance route from Castleton in the Hope Valley to Rocester in the more gently rolling countryside on the River Dove. The whole route is waymarked and can be completed in 4 or 5 days. The section from Bonsall to Matlock is an extension or spur - you will need to return from Matlock to Bonsall again if walking the full Limestone Way. The hillsides around Matlock and Bonsall are littered with old mine shafts; the area was once a haven for lead mining and the workings remain under the hillside. You will probably spot one or two shafts covered up. Under no circumstances be tempted to explore these!
Holyport village Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.4922196,-0.71475697 A 1.6 mile walk on the footpaths and bridleways around the picturesque village of Holyport in Berkshire. Holyport is not as well known as its neighbour Bray which is home to Heston's restaurant The Fat Duck, but it does have its own claim to fame in being home to one of the world's few real tennis courts. The Royal County of Berkshire Real Tennis Club was where Prince Edward first met his wife to be, Sophie. The pub at the start, The Belgian Arms, is a great find with good ales, excellent food and a warm welcome to walkers and dogs. The walk is flat with no stiles but there are a couple of narrow bridges and the grass footpaths could be muddy in wet weather. Look out for horse-riders and cyclists also using the paths.
Dogmersfield and the Basingstoke Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.27774745,-0.88571067 A 5 mile walk across the fields and along the lanes around Dogmersfield, a small peaceful village in Hampshire. There's plenty of water to enjoy with the Basingstoke Canal running through the area and a beautiful lake (Tundry Pond) situated in the grounds of Dogmersfield House. Dogmersfield House was originally built by the St John-Mildmays in 1727 and is now a hotel. The walk is relatively flat and includes a one mile section along the Baskingstoke Canal towpath. The paths are very narrow in places and they cross numerous fields so they could be very muddy in wet weather. The walk also includes a total of 16 stiles (if we counted correctly!) of varying heights and designs. Our dog managed to negotiate all of these easily as many of them have adjacent gaps for dogs to pass through. Only one caused some concern with barbed wire along all fence edges.
Ascot Heath Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.41575938,-0.66986098 A 1.8 mile circular stroll around the heath that sits inside Ascot Racecourse. Home to the famous Royal Ascot meeting every June, Ascot Racecourse sits in the heart of the town and houses an impressive grandstand that was rebuilt in 2007. The heath sits within the racecourse and is open for public access on non race days (check the web site at http://www.ascot.co.uk) from 6.30am to 7.30pm. The wide tarmac path gives an obvious route to follow and makes for easy walking. To extend the walk simply repeat the loop, or use the pedestrian underpass to visit Ascot High Street. The heath is open grassland with lots of hedges and ditches which are home to rabbits and plenty of birds. It contains a small cricket club along with a small but deep reservoir which is fenced off but keep an eye on small dogs/children to ensure they don't slip through any gaps in the fencing. You may come across the odd vehicle (grounds maintenance or cricket club members) driving around the tarmac circular route. Dog bins with a supply of bags are provided at various points around the route.
Binfield Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.439179195,-0.785372257 A 3 mile walk around the lanes and fields in the parish of Binfield in Berkshire. Until the early 19th century Binfield was situated in Windsor Forest and the remains of the oak tree at the Stag and Hounds public house is thought to have been in the middle of the forest. Binfield has connections with many famous historic characters including Alexander Pope and William Pitt. The walk is relatively flat but does follow field edges which will be very muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles, but a number of chain gates (see photos) which are opened by pushing apart the two sides. These are quite easy for dogs to negotiate but would be impossible for any pushchairs/wheelchairs.
Wayland's Smithy and Uffington White Horse Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.5771025,-1.57800137 A 3.5 mile circular walk near Ashbury in Oxfordshire which provides the opportunity to see a number of ancient sites and monuments along the way including a chalk white horse and an ancient burial chamber. With much of the route following an obvious chalk lane, the walk is relatively easy to navigate. The remainder of the walk crosses fields of grazing sheep so could be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles and just a gradual climb to the highest point on White Horse hill which provides fabulous views of the surrounding area.
Portland Lighthouses Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.51524265,-2.45625728 A 3.5 mile circular walk around the southern end of the Isle of Portland in Dorset taking in beautiful sea views and passing the three lighthouses of Portland Bill. The walk begins at the Portland Bill Lighthouse and follows the coast path north before turning to cross farmland and returning along the coastal path on the east side of Portland. The walk passes through a number of kissing gates. The route follows the coast path which is high and narrow in places so take care with children and dogs. The three lighthouses have played an important role over the years in safeguarding ships passing the headland. The Higher Lighthouse is now a dwelling and holiday apartments whilst the Lower Lighthouse is now a bird observatory and field centre which opened in 1961. The white and red Portland Bill Lighthouse on Bill Point replaced the Higher and Lower Lighthouses in 1906. It now contains a visitor centre giving information and guided tours.
Abbotsbury Hills and Coast Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.66510527,-2.59757192 An 8 mile circular walk from the picturesque Dorset village of Abbotsbury with its plentiful supply of stone thatched cottages. The walk climbs up to the South Dorset Ridgeway, which gives stunning views over a long stretch of coast, before heading down through the tiny village of West Bexington and back to Abbotsbury along the South West Coast Path alongside Chesil Beach. The walk has a couple of fairly steep ascents/descents, a fairly exposed section along the top of the Ridgeway and a couple of stiles. Most of the paths are across fields which could be muddy after wet weather and the fields are also likely to contain grazing cows and/or sheep so take extra care if you have dogs with you.
Wareham Walls and Rivers Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.6858117,-2.11463978 A 3 mile circular walk following the Walls of the Saxon market town of Wareham, including two short sections along the banks of the Rivers Frome and Piddle. The Walls are ancient earth ramparts surrounding the town, thought to have been built by Alfred the Great to defend the town from the Danes. There are a couple of stiles and the path alongside the River Piddle is very narrow with tall vegetation each side (if you wear shorts in summer be prepared for the nettles!) but otherwise the walk is easy to navigate and relatively flat.
Lawrence of Arabia Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.69500515,-2.2420009 This 7.5mile circular historical trail starts at the Bovington Tank Museum in Dorset and gives walkers the opportunity to visit both the former home and the final resting place of T. E. Lawrence, also known as Lawrence of Arabia. Lawrence was born in Wales in 1888. He studied history at Oxford University and then joined the army in 1914, progressing to Colonel by the end of the war. He first came to Bovington in 1923 where he joined the Tank Corps, buying the nearby retreat Clouds Hill in an attempt to escape the public eye. After a spell in the RAF he retired to Clouds Hill in 1935, but sadly only a few months later he was fatally injured in a motorbike accident. The route mostly follows wide rough stone and earth tracks through forests and plantations with no stiles. The walk is flat for the majority of its length, with just one steady climb to Clouds Hill. The popular walk, known as the Lawrence Trail, is clearly marked with wooden waymarkers. Limited opening times and entrance charges apply to some of the attractions so please check these separately when planning your walk.
Corfe Castle to Swanage Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.6359556,-2.06007278 An 8 mile linear walk along the Purbeck Ridge from Corfe Castle to Swanage returning by train on the heritage steam railway. The Isle of Purbeck, whilst not an island, has water on three sides with the English Channel to the south and east and Poole harbour to the north. The walk follows a stretch of the Purbeck Ridge for much of the way, affording panoramic views of the stunning local coastlines, before joining the South West Coast Path down into Swanage. The Swanage Railway is a six mile heritage railway between Swanage and Norden (including a stop at Corfe Castle). The journey takes just 20 minutes and the trains run every day of the week during the summer months (but only bank holidays and weekends in winter). Timetables vary so check before you travel, especially if you have a preference for steam or diesel. Dogs are permitted on the trains for a small charge. For most of the route the walk follows the wide grassy chalk ridge which makes quite easy walking. The ridge is very exposed and there are two quite long and steep climbs up lots of steps to the ridge tops. There are only two stiles on route and you are likely to be sharing the ridge path with cyclists, horse riders, sheep and cows so take care if you have dogs with you. Approximate time 4-5hrs.
Dorchester Town Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.71519357,-2.43667453 This 2 mile walk around Dorchester starts at the monument known as the Town Pump in South Street and takes in some of Dorchester's points of interest including The Thomas Hardy Brewery and the Maumbury Rings. The walk follows footpaths around the town and apart from needing to take care of traffic on some busy roads the walk is very easy and provides a few places to stop off on the way including the Borough Park. The county town of Dorset, Dorchester, is an historic market town that lies on the banks of the River Frome just south of the Dorset Downs and north of the South Dorset Ridgeway that separates the area from Weymouth. Dorchester's roots stem back to prehistoric times. Settlements were first based around Maiden Castle, a large Iron Age hill fort. The Romans built a wall around the town and the remains can still be seen today. Local author and poet Thomas Hardy based the fictional town of Casterbridge on Dorchester. Hardy's childhood home is to the east of the town, and his house in town, Max Gate, is owned by the National Trust and open to the public.
Dorchester Riverside and Farm Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.715095229,-2.441770434 A 3 mile circular walk from Dorchester exploring local farmland and the banks of the River Frome. The River Frome is one of the most important rivers in Britain for water voles and is an excellent habitat for lots of other wildlife. Water voles have suffered from habitat losses due to heavy grazing, housing development and river engineering along with predation from the American mink. Chalk streams such as the River Frome are now carefully managed to encourage growth in water vole numbers as they provide a perfect mix of plants, invertebrae and animals. The walk is flat with a number of gates but no stiles and follows a mixture of stone tracks, fields and pavements. Approximately 60 to 90mins.
Lulworth Cove and the Fossil Forest Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.6196391,-2.2536226 A 2 mile circular walk from Lulworth Cove taking in two of the most important features of the Dorset Jurassic Coast, Lulworth Cove and the Fossil Forest. The walk is short but has steep climbs and one steep scramble down the rocks to reach the beach at Lulworth Cove. Please note that access to the Fossil Forest is through Ministry of Defence land (Bindon Hill firing range) which is closed when live firing is taking place, so check with the Lulworth Cove Heritage Centre for opening times if you would like to visit the Forest.
Durdle Door and Swyre Head Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.6195217,-2.25281847 A 4 mile circular walk from Lulworth Cove in Dorset taking in a beautiful stretch of the Jurassic Coast, including the famous Durdle Door, before returning through farmland. The views across the World Heritage Coast are breathtaking and you'll be able to see the various chalk and limestone formations including coves, stacks and arches. There are no stiles (only gates) but the coast path follows undulating cliffs with several steep ascents. The inland return route follows a much gentler path, although you will share this with both cows and sheep. Approximate time 2-3hrs.
Frilsham Village and Woodlands Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.454165693,-1.206100881 A 3.5 mile circular walk taking in the village of Frilsham in West Berkshire, along with some of the beautiful mixed ornamental woodland nearby. Frilsham lies within the valley of the Pang and is surrounded by woods and meadows. The area is linked with the late 7th century legend of Princess Frideswade and you will have chance to see the well which is said to have sustained her while she was hiding nearby. The walk is relatively flat and has no stiles making easy walking, perfect for walking off a delicious lunch from The Pot Kiln pub. Some of the paths through the woodland are likely to be muddy after wet weather, but the majority of the walk follows stone tracks which provide a much firmer walking surface.
Blackheath and Chilworth Gunpowder Mills Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.20562,-0.518262 A 5 mile circular walk around the footpaths and lanes of the Surrey Hills taking in Blackheath Common
Sunningdale and Wentworth Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.399776,-0.631445 A 4 mile circular walk from Sunningdale in East Berkshire.
Donnington Castle and Snelsmore Common Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.420849,-1.349708 This is a circular walk of approximately 4 miles, including the remains of Donnington Castle, woodland and the easy tranquil paths of Snelsmore Common. There are no stiles on this walk and although there are a couple of fairly steep inclines the walk is suitable for all ages. Please note however it would be tricky to navigate some of the woodland with a pushchair. Snelsmore Common houses grazing cattle, although these tend to be around the edges of the common, so please be careful with dogs as you enter the common.
Twigmoor Woods Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.540075,-0.577375 A 3 mile walk following a figure of eight route through Twigmoor Woods in North Lincolnshire. Twigmoor is 130 acres of native woodland and introduced shrubs, conifers and ornamental species which creates a rich and varied habitat for wildlife. The woods are owned by the Scawby Estate with public access allowed in certain parts, giving nearly 3 miles of paths open to the public. There are extensive areas of rhododendrons (which give a stunning display of blooms in late spring) and also a number of large lakes. Dogs are welcome as long as they are under control at all times. The tracks are simple woodland paths which will be very muddy after wet weather and there are also exposed tree roots throughout to watch out for. There are no stiles or gates. The walk is relatively flat, with just a short steep slope up and down near the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
The Lookout and Cesar's Camp Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.387725,-0.740334 A 3.5 mile circular walk through Swinley Forest near Bracknell in Berkshire. The forest is popular with cyclists, dog walkers and families alike, providing fun and adventure for both children and dogs. The walk starts at The Lookout Discovery Centre in Bracknell and follows a circular route along the woodland tracks passing Cesar's Camp (an Iron Age Hill Fort). The Lookout is very popular, particularly at the weekend, so you are likely to find the first few hundred yards very busy, but as this part of Swinley Forest is more than 1,000 hectares, you will find more seclusion and tranquillity after this point. The forest is mainly coniferous, with patches set aside as heath and you are likely to see a variety of wildlife including birds, squirrels and deer. There is plenty for the whole family to enjoy at The Lookout site itself including a cafe, science discovery centre, Go Ape (a treetop assault course), a segway course and children's play areas. The walk follows forest tracks which are wide, open and well made but of course can be muddy in winter and after wet weather. You're likely to come across cyclists, dog walkers and even horse riders but generally you'll find that once you are into the walk the tracks will be quiet. There are no stiles and just a few gates. Whilst not entirely flat, the small number of ascents and descents are relatively gentle. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Hydon Heath Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.152634,-0.601563 This is a two mile circular walk through the woodland paths of Hydon Heath. There are some beautiful views and various points of interest throughout the walk including Octavia Hill's memorial bench and the Robertson Obelisk. The heath is extremely dog friendly, with no stiles or roads and plenty of areas to explore. Some of the paths would be difficult to navigate with a pushchair or wheelchair and there are a couple of steep hills. There is ample free parking at this National Trust site.
Explore Surrey: Weybridge Locks and Levels Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.361911,-0.457707 A 4.5 mile (7km) circular walk from Weybridge Station. The route passes through part of the town and along the towpath of the Wey Navigation between Weybridge and New Haw. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk is flat and has no stiles or other obstacles, just some steps. Some of the paths through woodland and alongside the canal will be very muddy after wet weather, so stout shoes or boots are recommended. One section of the canal towpath is quite narrow so take care with children and dogs here. At one point you will need to use a pedestrian crossing across the railway tracks – the crossing has gates and flights of steps each side, but again, take care with children and dogs. Allow 2 to 2.5 hours. If you are looking for refreshments, there are snack kiosks at Weybridge Station as well as toilets on platform 2. There are a number of pubs, cafes and shops in Weybridge and public toilets in the car park behind the library (near waypoint 2). The route also passes close to The White Hart pub in New Haw (near waypoint 6), which has a canal side garden and serves food. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 160 Windsor, Weybridge and Bracknell. This walk follows a National Trust towpath and footpaths which cross private land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code and National Trust byelaws.
Dorney Lake and Thames Path Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.503208,-0.661326 A 5 mile circular walk starting from Dorney village in Buckinghamshire. The walk makes a complete circuit around Dorney Lake which will be the venue for the rowing at London 2012 Olympics. (Of course this means that access to the walk may be difficult during the two weeks of the Olympics). The walk includes a 1.5mile section of the Thames Path giving you chance to watch the world go by on this popular part of the river. The walk is relatively flat with no stiles and just a couple of gates. The surfaces include country lanes, pavements, gravel paths and the towpath alongside the Thames. Parts of this towpath are narrow (so take care with children and dogs) and can be muddy, otherwise the paths make very easy walking. You will be sharing the paths with cyclists and joggers and you will also pass through Dorney Common which has cattle grazing, although these cattle seem to be at ease with the passing cars, horses, cyclists and walkers. Approximate time 2hrs.
Hascombe Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.145304,-0.569657 A 3 mile circular woodland walk from Hascombe in Surrey. The walk encircles Hascombe Hill which is the site of an Iron Age hill fort and comprises 6 acres of dense mixed woodland. The naturally steep sides of the hill provided natural defences for the hill fort and now these steep slopes afford excellent views across the Surrey Hills. The entire walk is through woodland making it ideal for dog walking. There are several steep ascents and descents and the paths are likely to be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles or gates, just a couple of staggered fences. Approximate time 90 minutes.
Hartley Wintney and Hazeley Heath Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.306843,-0.901524 A 6 mile circular walk starting from the village of Hartley Wintney in Hampshire. This is a particularly varied walk taking in the village itself together with local woodland, farmland and heath. The walk crosses the River Hart a couple of times and also passes through a section of Hazeley Heath, part of the Thames Basin Heath Special Protection Area. The Heath has cattle grazing in the summer. The walk is relatively flat with just one fairly steep descent. There is one stile (this is beside a locked gate which has space at the bottom for most dogs to pass under) plus a number of kissing gates, a couple of footbridges (with steps) and several v-shape squeeze gaps. More than one third of the walk is along roads, but these are very quiet country lanes, with the rest along field edges, woodland tracks and heathland footpaths (all of which will be muddy after wet weather). Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Brookwood and the Basingstoke Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.303954,-0.635807 A 5.5 mile circular walk starting from Brookwood Station in Surrey. The walk follows the towpath of the Basingstoke canal and then passes through the village of St John's near Woking, cuts across the railway and a golf course before returning to the towpath for the return stretch. The walk is relatively flat and provides relatively easy walking and navigation. The paths include long sections of the canal towpath (which can be narrow, muddy and overgrown in places) along with pavements, road edges and tarmac paths. There is just one stile (which is quite small and relatively open to allow most dogs to pass through alongside) and you will also need to cross a golf course so take here to avoid the balls flying down the fairways. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Windsor and Eton via the Thames Path Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.485807,-0.608316 A 4 mile circular walk starting in Windsor in Berkshire, following a section of the Thames Path and passing through Eton. This walk has a great mix of scenery, moods and flavours. You may wish to take the opportunity to explore Windsor before you set off, joining the large numbers of international tourists who visit for the royal attraction of Windsor Castle or simply to enjoy some retail therapy in the numerous independent shops and boutiques. Very quickly into the walk you will escape the hustle and bustle of Windsor onto the Thames Path where you will see a slower pace of life with locals and tourists messing around on the river. Finally the walk takes you through the heart of Eton where you will be transported to the elite world of Britain's most famous public school with the boys wearing the iconic morning coats. The walk is relatively flat and follows a mixture of pavements, gravel paths through open parks and rough grass fields (which are likely to be muddy after wet weather). There are no stiles, but a number of gates/kissing gates and you will pass through one field which is likely to be holding cattle. Approximate time 2 hours.
Wrabness Coast Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.939688,1.111427 A short shoreline walk along Wrabness Beach in Essex. Wrabness is a small village located six miles west of Harwich with a population of approximately 400. The walk follows the shoreline for about two miles before returning by the same route.
Dinton Pastures Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.440153,-0.872713 A 3 mile circular walk around the lakes of Dinton Pastures Country Park in Berkshire. The park covers more than 300 acres and is open daily throughout the year. It offers a variety of habitats including seven lakes, two rivers, woodland and a number of meadows. The park is a real haven for birders with a variety of wetland birds such as swans, geese, coots, moorhens plus rarer species including bitterns. The walk is flat with no stiles or gates. The paths vary from wider stone paths to wetter riverside mud paths, the latter of which are prone to flooding after very wet weather. Dogs are welcome in the park but should be kept under control. In a couple of places dogs need to be on leads to protect the birds (these areas are clearly signed). Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Turville TV Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.613642,-0.892424 A circular walk of a little more than 3 miles, starting in the village of Turville in the Chilterns. Turville is one of Britain's most popular TV and film locations and has featured regularly on both the small and large screen. The picturesque quintessentially English village will immediately transport you back in time and the views along the walk (which includes sections of the Chiltern Way) across the chalk hills are truly scrumptious! The walk follows woodland and field paths (which could be muddy) plus some sections along roads edges. There are a couple of steady but long ascents and one quite steep descent. The walk passes through a number of gates (including two kissing gates) and there are three stiles to negotiate. Two of the stiles are surrounded by open post and rail wooden fences which would be easy for most dogs to squeeze through. The third stile has wire fencing across it (but no barbed wire) and there is a hole cut into this to the side – our standard poodle fitted through ok but larger dogs may struggle. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Winchester and St Catherine's Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.066166,-1.319845 A 5 mile circular walk from Winchester railway station in Hampshire. The walk gives a lovely mix to suit all tastes. You will have chance to explore Winchester itself, a historic bustling cathedral city, before the walk passes through the tranquil water meadows and along the River Itchen. The route then climbs St Catherine's Hill, the site of an ancient hill fort which provides stunning views across the city, before descending and continuing along another stretch of the river and back to the city. The walk follows a mixture of pavements, river banks, towpaths and grass paths. There are a few steady ascents/descents plus one fairly steep climb up the wooden steps to the top of St Catherine's Hill and a fairly steep descent down the grass/gravel paths on the other side of the hill which are uneven and can be a bit slippy (if you prefer you can adjust the walk and use the steps for the descent as well). There are no stiles, just a few gates and dogs are welcome on St Catherine's Hill. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Whitehill and Hannington Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.30545,-1.260242 A circular walk of about 6.5 miles starting from the Whitehill viewpoint near Kingsclere in Hampshire. The walk passes through a stunning part of the North Hampshire Downs and includes a section of the Wayfarers Walk long distance path. The views are spectacular throughout and on a clear day you will be able to see for miles across the downs. Bird lovers are also likely to be rewarded with a good chance of sightings of buzzards, kestrels and skylarks. The paths pass mainly through woodland and across fields and so are likely to be muddy after wet weather. There are a couple of sections of road walking on quiet country lanes and a number of steady ascents and descents. The walk passes through a number of gates and five stiles and also passes through a field which is likely to contain cattle. All the stiles have gaps in the wire fencing either alongside or under that most dogs should be able to squeeze through. Approximate time 3 hours.
Morgaston Woods Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.310212,-1.104663 A 2 mile circular walk around Morgaston Woods, part of The Vyne National Trust estate in Hampshire. The walk follows paths through this beautiful ancient woodland and one section runs alongside Wey Brook which feeds the Vyne estate lakes and is home to an array of wetland birds. There is free access to the woods from the Middle Gate entrance throughout the year. The walk follows concrete and dirt paths which are quite flat apart from a few protruding tree roots making it suitable for all ages and pushchairs (although the paths may be muddy after wet weather). Entrance is through a single kissing gate but this is nice and wide/long and should allow most chairs through. Dogs are welcome but must be kept on leads. The woods can get quite busy at the weekend with visitors to the adjoining National Trust property. Approximate time 1 hour.
South Hill Park and Cesar's Camp Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.393103,-0.749907 A 4 mile circular walk taking in the grounds of South Hill Park arts centre, an elegant red-brick mansion mostly of the Victorian period. It stands within fine gardens and the remnants of its original 800 acre park. The parkland is designated as a Grade II registered park of special historic interest. It provides a valuable habitat with its woodland of birch, oak, sweet chestnut and exotic species, parkland areas with formal lawns, two lakes (which act as balancing ponds) and wetland areas. The walk continues through local residential areas and then into Swinley Forest to Cesar's Camp Iron Age hillfort. The hillfort was built between 2500 and 2700 years ago and is designated as a scheduled ancient monument. The walk follows a mixture of parkland paths, pavements and forest tracks with a couple of short but fairly steep ascents and descents in the forest section. Some of the forest tracks will also be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles but the walk does pass through three kissing gates. Dogs are welcome both in the South Hill Park grounds and in Cesar's Camp. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Pangbourne and River Thames Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.484529,-1.088549 A 3.5 mile circular walk starting from the Berkshire village of Pangbourne and taking in the local meadows and countryside. There's plenty of water to enjoy with sections of the walk following the River Pang and a further section following the Thames Path. Pangbourne is a beautiful village and popular tourist destination and has historical links to DH Lawrence and Kenneth Grahame. The walk is almost entirely flat and follows a mixture of field and riverside paths (which may be muddy after wet weather) plus a short section of road walking along a country lane. There is just one stile (which is nice and open with space for dogs to pass through) plus a number of gates including a few kissing gates. There are public toilets available in the car park at the start. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Windsor Great Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.445954,-0.637928 A 5.5 mile loop around Windsor Great Park, once part of the royal hunting ground and now providing miles and miles of peaceful walking in amongst the hustle and bustle of East Berkshire. Windsor Great Park is 5,000 acres in size, dates primarily to the 13th Century and is managed by the Crown Estate. Throughout the walk you'll have magnificent views of Windsor Castle as well as a chance to see some of the famous statues within the park such as the Copper Horse. The walk follows a mixture of tarmac paths, grass avenues and sand tracks some of which will be muddy after wet weather. There are several gradual ascents and descents throughout the walk, but these are well worthwhile with the views the hill tops provide. There are no stiles and just a couple of deer gates (tall kissing gates). Dogs are welcome in the Great Park, although they need to be on leads in some areas and under close control at all times. You are likely to share the paths with many cyclists and horse riders and you will also pass through part of the deer park. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
Francis Corner Woodland Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.235793,-0.458194 A 3.5 mile circular woodland walk from the Francis Corner car park near Shere in Surrey. The walk passes through a mixed working woodland and includes a short section of the North Downs Way. At the Little Kings Wood viewing point you will be rewarded with magnificent views across the downs. The walk follows forest tracks most of which are stone and well made, but there are some parts that can get muddy. There are a few slopes but these are reasonably gentle. There are no stiles or gates but you are likely to be sharing the paths with both cyclists and horse riders. Dogs are welcome off lead as long as they are under control. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Finchampstead and Fleet Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.368912,-0.861688 A 3.5mile circular walk around the footpaths and byways near Finchampstead in Berkshire. The walk follows long straight paths lined with beautiful stretches of ancient trees and holly bushes. The walk follows mud footpaths many of which will be very muddy after wet weather. The walk is relatively flat except a short but steep climb to the church towards the end. There are three stiles but all of these are low and open and will be easy for most people to pass over and for most dogs to pass under or alongside. There are a number of kissing gates many of which are quite narrow. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Reading Town, River and Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.456609,-0.970411 A 3 mile loop around Reading and its two rivers the Thames and Kennet. The walk takes in the Thames Path, former industrial areas and the historic grounds and ruins of Reading Abbey. Reading is a large town built on the confluence of the River Thames and the River Kennet. It is also served by the Great Western Railway and the M4 Motorway. First evidence of settlement dates from the 8th Century although it became important in medieval times with the founding of Reading Abbey. The walk follows a mixture of tarmac paths, grass tracks and towpaths. The walk is flat other than steps leading to and from the rivers, a long bridge over the Kennet Canal (suitable for people and horses!), and a small set of steps leading into Forbury Gardens at the end of the walk. Dogs should be kept under control along the route looking out for fishermen, cyclists, joggers and heavy road traffic in places. However, there is also the opportunity to visit two museums along the way that are not accessible for dogs. Approximate time 2 hours.
Moor Copse Nature Reserve Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.459871,-1.089564 The reserve is open all year round, and is renowned for woodland flowers, birds, butterflies and moths. It is well served by footpaths and rides that connect all the copses and fields. Spring and summer are probably the best times of the year to visit. Please keep dogs on short leads as there can be grazing stock about, quite apart from disturbing the wildlife. This walk follows the 1.5 mile Wildlife Walk trail and is clearly signed with white round waymarks. This Berkshire reserve forms part of the Sulham and Tidmarsh Woods and Meadows Site of Special Scientific Interest. Fringing the beautiful River Pang, Moor Copse nature reserve appeals to walkers and natural historians alike. The ancient woodland is a place of character, variety and great beauty, with its 70 acres comprising of three woodland copses, a small meadow and a healthy chalk stream. The site is owned and managed by Berkshire, Buckingham and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust and at the end of 2006 was extended by another 72 acres of meadows, hedgerows and copses. The walk follows mud footpaths many of which will be very muddy after wet weather. The walk is flat and there are no stiles but a number of easy to use gates. Approximate time 1 hour. Whilst it is a short walk you may wish to take an extra hour to appreciate fully the wildlife and wooded areas along the way.
Ellesborough and Chequers Court Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.755249,-0.78043 A 5 mile walk in the Buckinghamshire Chilterns which takes walkers on a circular route around Chequers Court, the Prime Minister's official country residence. Taking in a range of hills and valleys within the Chiltern's area of outstanding natural beauty the views are beautiful from many points. The walk also includes a section of the Ridgeway, said to be Britain's oldest road. The walk follows woodland and field paths which will be very muddy and slippery after wet weather. There are several fairly steep ascents and decents including a number of steps. The walk passes over six stiles (all of which have open fencing alongside for dogs to pass through) and a number of gates. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Marlow and Thames Path Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.57026,-0.77506 A 4 mile circular walk from the town of Marlow in Buckinghamshire, a beautiful Georgian town situated on a picturesque stretch of the River Thames midway between Reading and Windsor. The walk starts in the centre of town before passing through local meadows out to the River Thames and then returning via a stretch of the Thames Path. The walk is almost entirely flat and there are no stiles, just a couple of kissing gates. The surfaces are a mixture of pavements and river and field side mud tracks which will be muddy after wet weather. (We tracked this walk in Jan 2012 and the section of the Thames Path was about 3 inches of thick mud so do wear suitable footwear in the winter months). Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Gribdale gate Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.491008,-1.087663 This is a 4 mile circular walk encompassing some steep hills and tremendous views across the North York Moors as you progress around Captain Cook's Monument. There are two steep hills on this walk, one at the beginning and another three quarters of the way through the walk. Walkers should be aware that there are some stone path descents which will be slippery in excessive wet or icy weather. There are no stiles. Please note that there is nowhere to purchase refreshments at the car park or during the walk.
Great Bedwyn and Wilton Windmill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.379293,-1.599261 A 5.5 mile circular walk from the unspoilt village of Great Bedwyn in Wiltshire. The walk has a lovely mix of things to see including a few glimpses of industrial heritage. You'll get chance to enjoy a long stretch of the Kennet and Avon Canal along with the old Crofton Pumping Station and Wilton Windmill, the only remaining working windmill in Wessex. On the return stretch you'll pass through woodlands and fields before getting chance to explore Great Bedwyn itself. The walk has only a few steady ascents and descents and there are no stiles, just a few easy to use gates and one squeeze gap. The majority of the route is along earth and stone tracks, towpaths and paths all of which will be muddy after wet weather. There is one small stretch of road walking and you will also need to cross the railway tracks towards the end of the walk so take care here with children and dogs. Check the opening times of the windmill and pumping station if you want to see inside these attractions. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Salisbury Cathedral and Water Meadows Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.066307,-1.79816 An easy 2 mile circular walk in the city of Salisbury in Wiltshire, following in the footsteps of the artist John Constable. The walk starts at Salisbury Cathedral, before passing out through the famous water meadows and the Old Mill then returning through residential streets and over the River Avon back to the cathedral. The walk is flat and is entirely on tarmac paths and pavements. There are no stiles or gates making it easy access for everyone and even suitable for pushchairs and wheelchairs. Approximate time 1 hour.
Salisbury River and Old Sarum Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.069131,-1.795229 A 5.5 mile circular walk starting from the market square in the centre of Salisbury in Wiltshire. The walk follows a stretch of the River Avon on the way out to the ancient hill fort of Old Sarum before passing back through the city's residential suburbs, across railways and roads and through parks. The walk follows a wide variety of surfaces, from tarmac pavements and paths to playing fields and stone and mud paths. Some of the surfaces will be muddy after wet weather. There are a few steady inclines and a number of easy to use gates, but there are no stiles. The Old Sarum site is open all year but there are restricted daytime opening hours so check before you plan your visit. Dogs are welcome in Old Sarum as long as they are on a lead as there are sheep grazing here. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Turnhouse and Carnethy Hills Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.854524,-3.226008 A 7.5 mile circular walk in the Pentland Hills Regional Park which takes in the summits of Turnhouse and Carnethy Hills and returns alongside Loganlea and Glencourse Reservoirs.
Craiglockhart Dell and Water of Leith Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.919185,-3.248113 A 1.3 mile circular walk in Craiglockhart Dell which lies on the western margins of Edinburgh and Craiglockhart. The Dell is a steep sided wooded valley running from Slateford to Colinton that hosts a section of the Water of Leith Walkway.
Nercwys forest Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.124879,-3.169575 A circular woodland walk of just more than 5 miles in Nercwys Forest in Flintshire. The walk follows woodland tracks and you will have the opportunity to enjoy two viewpoints with superb views across the surrounding area. The woodland tracks may be muddy after wet weather. There are a few ascents and descents and a couple of gates plus you will need to cross 10 stiles including a couple of ladder stiles. You can avoid the stiles and shorten the walk by excluding the spur section to Bryn Alan. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Henley-on-Thames and Aston Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.53261,-0.895347 A 6.5mile circular walk starting from Henley-on-Thames in Oxfordshire. The walk follows a long stretch of the Thames Path north up to Hambleden Lock, before turning away from the river to return via woodland and grass meadows. The walk is mainly flat with just a couple of short ascents and it follows a mixture of tarmac, stone and firm mud tracks, some of which may be slippy after wet weather. There are 5 stiles and a few kissing gates, but all of the stiles have open fencing alongside making them easy for most dogs to negotiate. Note that access to the walk will not be possible during Henley Regatta. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Greenwich Observatory Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.483601,-0.008337 A walk to the Greenwich Observatory from North Greenwich Pier. The walk follows good surfaces, there are no stiles or kissing gates and there is one fairly steep incline.
Llyn Elsi Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.09115,-3.803223 A beautiful walk in Betwys-Y-Coed. It starts with a steep climb but it is worth it for the stunning views of the snowdonian moutain range and the lovely walk around the lake. There are no stiles. Approximate time 2 hours.
Cookham and Strand Water Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.560156,-0.713898 A 2 mile short stroll from the picturesque and popular village of Cookham in Berkshire. Cookham is well known for its selection of independent village shops along with a wide range of pubs and restaurants and its Thames setting, and so provides a lovely place to explore. The village is said to be home to lots of famous people including rugby coach Sir Clive Woodward and presenter Ulrika Jonsson. The walk follows a short route south alongside Strand Water, a wide stream, before crossing the water and returning north through paddocks and fields. The walk is relatively flat and follows field and streamside paths which may be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles, but several gates including one kissing gate. Approximate time 1 hour.
Easter Craiglockhart Hill and pond Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.925362,-3.229833 A short one mile circular walk around Easter Craiglockhart Hill which rises dramatically through cliff-faces and steeply wooded slopes to a plateau of rabbit-cropped turf, featuring views out over the Forth, the Trossachs, the Pentlands and East Lothian, as well as the fascinating city-scape all around. A short walk around the Nature Trail - devised and maintained by a vigorous group of local residents - reveals a surprising variety of habitats. The park has been awarded a Green Flag since 2009, in recognition of it being a quality greenspace.
Swinley Forest: Ascot Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.398106,-0.679974 This is a circular walk encompassing a small section of Swinley Forest. The walk follows some clear paths, although these can become muddy during the winter. There are a couple of small hills but the rest of the walk is flat and there are no stiles. You might be lucky enough to witness one of the Alaskan Malamute dog sled trials in the wood which are held a couple of times a year in this section of the wood.
Twyford and Loddon Nature Reserve Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.480057,-0.861542 A 4.5 mile circular walk starting from Twyford in East Berkshire. The walk takes in some of the residential streets of the village before following the River Loddon through a beautiful nature reserve of lakes (former gravel pits) and then returning to Twyford across fields. The route is relatively flat and the surfaces are a mixture of pavement, riverside, lakeside and field paths, many of which will be very muddy in winter and/or after wet weather so suitable footwear is advisable. There are several kissing gates and two stiles (both of which have gaps alongside or underneath suitable for most dogs). You will be sharing some of the fields with horses so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2 hours.
Test Walk _ Do Not Use Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.388093,-0.760331 Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. Time 2 hours.
Horsham and Denne Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.060009,-0.330732 Hi I'm Lucy and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk. It's a 3 mile circular walk from the market town of Horsham, making its way alongside the River Arun before climbing Denne Hill and passing through woodland and farmland to return to the town. All in all? A lovely outing. To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. The walk has a couple of steady climbs/descents and follows a range of woodland and farmland paths which can be muddy after wet weather and in winter. There are no stiles, just a few kissing gates to negotiate. One section of the walk passes through Denne Park where cattle are grazing so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Cold Ash Village and Copses Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.429767,-1.268109 A 3 mile walk from the West Berkshire village of Cold Ash taking in the quiet village streets, local farmland and the many woodland copses that surround the village. The village lanes give you chance to see the variety of local properties and the long stretches of holly trees. The woodlands are beautiful all year round and early on in the walk you will be rewarded with stunning views over the hills and woodlands to the north east. There are only a few gentle ascents/descents and the tracks are mostly well made but the field and woodland paths can be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles or kissing gates – just a few easy to use single gates making the walk easy access. You will pass through a field holding cattle (sometimes with a bull) or horses at one point so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Cosgrove and Grand Union Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.075675,-0.845555 A 2.7 mile circular walk from the quiet Northamptonshire village of Cosgrove. The walk follows a bustling stretch of the Grand Union Canal including passing over the Iron Trunk Aqueduct and also gives a flavour of times gone by, passing under the canal via the old horse and cattle tunnels. You'll have chance to admire the many beautiful canal boats that are moored on this stretch of canal throughout the year. The walk is almost entirely flat and follows good gravel and tarmac surfaces for the first half before returning via pastures and farmland which may be muddy. The tunnels under the canal are narrow, low (you'll need to crouch!) and also can be slippery. There are a few gates and two stiles, both of which have open fencing around making them easy for most dogs. Towards the end of the walk you will need to cross the canal via a narrow lock gate so take care with children and dogs here. You may be sharing some of the pastures with cows or sheep. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Discovering Bingley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.848581435,-1.837566813 A great walk to discover Bingley starts at the train station then goes around the Aire River and Harden Beck Foot, the Leeds and Liverpool canal and its famous Five Rise Locks to finish all the way up to Gilstead crag, just to appreciate the view, and comes back down to the station through quiet streets. There are several ascents and descents throughout the walk and while most of the route follows well made paths some of the sections in fields and woodland can be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles.
Kinver Edge and Cave Houses Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.450608,-2.242507 A 3.5 mile circular walk along Kinver Edge, a high heath and woodland escarpment running south from the large village of Kinver in southern Staffordshire. The walk provides truly spectacular views from the top of the escarpment. On clear days you will be able to see for around 30 miles across to the Malvern Hills. There is also chance to explore Holy Austin rock houses, dug into the sandstone rock and home to Britain's last cave dwellers through to the 1960s. The rock houses have been restored and are now managed by the National Trust. The walk includes a couple of both short-steep and longer-steadier climbs and descents. The surfaces are mainly good gravel paths but the climbs and descents through the woodland can be slippery in wet weather. A handrail is provided in the steepest section. There are no stiles and just a few kissing gates. Parts of the heath are used to graze cattle in the summer so take care with dogs. The site is owned and managed by the National Trust. Access to Kinver Edge is free and open dawn to dusk all year round. Holy Austin rock house itself has limited opening times and charges apply to go inside the recreated homes so check the National Trust website before you visit. The adjacent tea room also has limited opening hours. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours to complete the walk.
Bewdley and Ribbesford Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.373609,-2.310596 A 2 mile circular waymarked trail from the pretty Worcestershire town of Bewdley. The walk heads out along fenced paths and tracks across farmland before returning alongside a picturesque stretch of the River Severn. The walk is relatively flat with no stiles and just a few kissing gates. The route follows gravel, mud and grass paths some of which are likely to be muddy after wet weather. Approximate time 45 minutes to 1 hour.
Steyning Upper Horseshoe Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.889126,-0.325251 A circular walk of just more than 3 miles from the small market town of Steyning in West Sussex. Steyning is a charming town, popular with tourists, from home and abroad, for its architecture, rich history and wonderful location at the foot of the South Downs. The walk follows the trail known locally as the upper horseshoe, climbing high into the South Downs and then following the horseshoe shaped ridge before descending back into the town. Whilst it is a short walk, the climb is quite strenuous so ideal for those people perhaps short of time but still wanting a challenge. The walk follows chalk and clay paths which may be muddy after wet weather. There is a long and reasonably steep climb to reach the ridge and some sections of the descent are also a little steep. There are no stiles and just a few gates and kissing gates. Cattle may be grazing in the short section through chalk grassland so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Alice Holt Lodge Pond Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.169806,-0.840819 A figure-of-eight woodland walk of just less than 3 miles through Alice Holt Forest in Surrey. The walk gives a lovely mixture of typical woodland tracks along with a short stretch alongside Lodge Pond and then a section of the sculpture trail giving younger family members (or those young at heart!) the chance to play on the giant owl, woodpecker and butterfly. The walk follows narrow woodland tracks which have lots of exposed tree roots and will be very muddy after wet weather or in winter. The walk has a few steady climbs and descents and there are a couple of sections with steps. The route is waymarked and there are no stiles or gates. Dogs are welcome in the forest. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Ilkley to Bingley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.924593529,-1.821380198 This linear walk is a great railway walk because it starts and finishes at railway stations making the walk really accessible. You will cross Ilkley Moor and go from the lush green Wharfedale to the industrial Airedale. On the Wharfedale side there is a small detour to the Cow and Calf rocks to start with but you could just make your way to White Wells instead (a white cottage hanging on the hill side which was used as a spa therapy treatment base in Victorian times) and follow the Dales Way Link thus avoiding an extra mile to walk. On the Airedale side, you will arrive in the charming village of Micklethwaite before making your way towards Bingley via the Leeds & Liverpool canal Five Rise Locks. The moors are a wild and boggy place and you will need adequate walking equipment for this walk. Most of the walk is on Open Access land so please remember the Countryside Code. There are some stiles on this walk too. No toilets and refreshments are available along the walk although both Ilkley and Bingley have public toilets as well as some public houses and coffee shops.
Acres Down Woodland Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.886435,-1.620979 A circular woodland walk of just less than 3 miles through a beautiful section of the New Forest called Acres Down near the tiny village of Minstead, north of Lyndhurst in Hampshire. The walk follows wide, well-made gravel tracks and all the slopes are quite gentle making it fairly easy walking. There are no gates or stiles. As part of the New Forest, Acres Down does have free roaming ponies so you're likely to come across some of these both in the car park and throughout the walk. To reach the car park you will need to drive through a ford. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Pyrford and the Wey Navigation Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.305427,-0.509815 A 4 mile circular walk through the village of Pyrford, near Woking in Surrey. The walk has plenty of interest passing the ruins of Newark Priory and Pyrford's Norman church before heading across peaceful farmland to Pyrford Lock and returning alongside the picturesque Wey Navigation. The walk is generally flat with just one very short but fairly steep climb to the church. There are two stiles (both in open fencing making them easy for dogs to pass under) and several gates including one very tight kissing gate. There is one section of road walking along a narrow pavement at the beginning. The walk crosses a golf course so take care here to avoid the balls flying down the fairways! The paths are mostly mud towpaths and field paths all of which may be muddy after wet weather. The towpaths are quite narrow so take care with children. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Milverton and the Saxon Mill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.302782,-1.541451 A walk from Lillington to the Saxon Mill pub via Milverton Church. The walk follows rights of way across rolling fields which the local farmer should be congratulated for maintaining so well. Sometimes after wet weather the paths can be a little muddy but normally they are an easy and pleasant walk. There are several kissing gates on route but no stiles.
Symonds Yat and the Wye Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.840315,-2.638483 A 3 mile circular walk from the small village of Symonds Yat East in Gloucestershire, taking in a stunning stretch of the wooded Wye Valley. The walk begins with a trip on the hand-pulled ferry across the River Wye to the west bank, before turning south along the Wye Valley and then crossing back to the east side via a suspension footbridge and back along an old railway to return to Symonds Yat East. The walk is right on the borders of three counties and your journey will take you through Gloucestershire, Herefordshire and Monmouthshire. The word ‘picturesque' was coined in William Gilpin's 1770 book ‘Observations on the River Wye' and this walk gives a real insight into his new theories on landscapes. The walk is mainly flat and there are no stiles or gates but just a few steps. The first section is through a narrow mud woodland path which will be slippery after wet weather, but the majority of the walk follows well-made stone tracks. The route starts with a river crossing via the hand-pulled ferry run by the Saracen's Head public house. Charges are £1.20 per adult, 60p per child and dogs can be taken on the ferry for free. The ferry runs throughout the year unless the river is in flood, but you can call the pub to check before you set out if you wish. The second river crossing is via a suspension footbridge which has a solid base but is high over the river and bounces a little as you cross so may not be for the faint-hearted. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Penallt and the Wye Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.779189,-2.694129 A 4.2 mile circular walk from Penallt in Monmouthshire taking in a beautiful stretch of the Wye Valley. Penallt is set high on a hill above Monmouth and the walk begins with a long descent into the valley, before following the path alongside the River Wye and then climbing back steeply into the hills to return to the village. The views throughout are spectacular and in spring the woodlands boast a beautiful carpet of bluebells. A fairly strenuous outing, but well worth it! The walk has several fairly steep and long ascents and descents including some sections with uneven steps cut into the woodland paths. There are a few gates plus five stiles on route, two of which are stone stiles which most dogs (and some humans!) could need help to climb. The paths are mainly mud woodland and river side tracks which will be muddy after wet weather. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
Speech House and the Forest of Dean Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.807551,-2.547744 A 3 mile circular woodland walk through the Forest of Dean starting from Speech House. Speech House is now a hotel but has always been home to the Verderers' Court Room which helps to manage the forest, game and mineral resources of the area. The Forest of Dean gives a wonderful setting for the walk with dense plantations of coniferous and deciduous trees with thick carpets of moss and woodland flowers below. When the sun beams fall through the trees onto the moss below the effect is really magical. At any moment you expect King Arthur to emerge through the trees and in fact the BBC's drama series Merlin was filmed nearby. The walk follows well made forest tracks and there are just a couple of very gradual ascents and descents. There are a few gates but no stiles. The forest is home to deer and also wild boar – whilst sightings of the latter are rare take care with dogs. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Waverley Abbey and Tilford Village Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.202494,-0.755998 A 4 mile circular walk near Farnham in Surrey taking in the remains of Waverley Abbey (the first Cistercian Abbey in Britain) along with a visit to the picturesque village of Tilford. The walk is relatively flat, there are no stiles and just a couple of gates/kissing gates. There are a few sections of road walking, including several hundred metres without pavements so the walk probably isn't suitable for children. The woodland tracks will be very muddy after wet weather. Entry to the Abbey ruins is free, dogs are welcome and the site is open during daylight hours every day. Approximate time 2 hours.
Shipbourne and the Fairlawne Estate Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.246928,0.281295 A four mile circular walk starting from the small village of Shipbourne (pronounced ‘Shibbun') in Kent. The walk leaves the pretty village via the village church and out through open countryside and woodland to reach Ightham Mote and Fairlawne Estate (two estates with intriguing histories) before returning to Shipbourne. A lovely walk through the beautiful rolling Kent countryside. The walk follows mainly field and woodland tracks which will be muddy after wet weather. There are also a couple of short sections of road walking along quiet country lanes with no pavements. Some of the fields will be holding sheep so take care with dogs. The walk has a few steady climbs and descents, there are six stiles (the first three of which are surrounded by wire mesh so dogs will need to be able to climb them or be lifted over) plus a number of gates/kissing gates. Ightham Mote is owned by the National Trust. The walk follows public footpaths through the estate but if you wish to tour the house itself check the National Trust website for prices and opening times. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Tetbury Town Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.638215,-2.155227 A short circular stroll around the pretty Cotswolds market town of Tetbury. The Costwolds are well known for their pretty historic towns and Tetbury is no exception, with most of the town's buildings dating from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The walk follows mainly pavements and tarmac paths with just one short section along a mud path. There are no stiles and just one very simple wide gate. The walk does include some hills both up and down but as long as you're prepared for the hard work these pose (!) it would be possible to take round a pushchair. Approximate time 1 hour.
Malmesbury River Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.583288,-2.096863 A 3 mile circular trail from the market town of Malmesbury in the southern Cotswolds in Wiltshire. The walk starts in the centre of the town before heading out to join the riverside path along the River Avon. The walk is a lovely mix with some peaceful sections of riverside walking along with opportunities to explore the history of the town. The walk is relatively flat and follows mainly riverside and field paths which will be very muddy after wet weather. There are a number of gates/kissing gates plus one metal squeeze gap and four stiles. The squeeze gap step is quite low and the first three stiles have large gaps alongside/underneath suitable for dogs. The final stile has closed fencing surrounding it but there is a mid height stone wall alongside which most dogs should be able to cross. One of the fields is likely to be holding cattle. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Elsing Village and Harnser Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.70786,1.037859 A 1.5 mile circular stroll around the village of Elsing in Norfolk. The walk starts from the village hall before passing by the church and pub (salvation and damnation!) and then heading alongside farmland to reach the small but perfectly formed Harnser Wood and back into the village. The walk is almost entirely flat and follows a mixture of quiet country lanes, field edge paths and woodland grass paths which will be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles and just a couple of kissing gates. The field edge path can be quite overgrown with nettles and brambles so shorts are not advisable! Approximate time 45 minutes.
Thetford Forest Fir Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.435266,0.661933 A 3.5 mile circular trail through Thetford Forest on the border of Suffolk and Norfolk. The trail takes you deep into the forest to enjoy the wide variety of fir species planted throughout the forest. Along the way you're likely to see plenty of wildlife including squirrels, rabbits and deer (much to the delight of our dog!) and there is also an opportunity for younger family members to enjoy the giant play sculptures. The walk is relatively flat with just a few steady slopes and the woodland tracks will be muddy after wet weather and in winter. There are no stiles or gates and the route is waymarked to help you find your way. There is a cafe and toilet facilities at the start of the walk. The visitor centre can get very busy at peak times but once you're out into the forest it soon becomes peaceful again. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Chobham Common Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.374568,-0.602964 A 3.5 mile circular walk around Chobham Common, a beautiful nature reserve in Surrey. The walk follows the paths through the length of the common, giving you chance to enjoy views across the lowland heath and surrounding woodlands. A real favourite with dogs, with plenty of areas to run, paddle, play and explore. The walk follows heath paths which will be very muddy after heavy rain. There are no stiles or gates and the climbs and descents are very gradual and long. The final section of the walk follows a narrow path through thick gorse (shorts are not advised!) and over a narrow low sleeper bridge. At certain times of the year temporary electric fence/gates are installed to allow cattle to graze so take care with dogs within any of these enclosures. The common is fairly remote so there are no refreshment or toilet facilities anywhere on the route. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Norwich Bridges and Churches Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.633743,1.287338 A 5 mile circular walk around the city of Norwich in Norfolk. The first half of the walk follows the banks of the River Wensum, criss-crossing back and forth via the numerous bridges – the oldest dating back to around 1340 and the newest having only been built in 2012. The return leg takes you through the centre of the ancient city itself, and you'll have glimpses of the old city walls, the castle and the numerous churches as well as an opportunity for some retail therapy should you wish! The city walk is one of the most varied we know, with a true mix of ancient historical buildings, industrial heritage and modern architecture. The walk follows mainly well made paths and pavements. There are no stiles or gates but several fights of steps. There are a few steady climbs/descents plus one fairly steep climb about half way round. Some of the access is through parks, the gates for which are locked at dusk. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Edwards Hall Park Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.576039,0.647899 A short circular walk through farmers fields and a variety of local woods, through the Roach Valley. The walk has a few fairly gentle slopes and the paths can be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles.
Thursley Common Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.150396,-0.714791 A 5 mile circular walk from the pretty village of Thursley in Surrey. The walk starts at the centre of the village before heading out over Thursley Common Nature Reserve and then back though woodland and past equestrian paddocks to return to the village. The walk has just a few short and mostly gentle climbs and descents. There are a few kissing gates and two stiles – the first one has plenty of open fencing around suitable for dogs to pass through and the second is a stone stile which is around one foot high so should be easy enough for most dogs (and humans!). The walk follows heathland, woodland and farm paths all of which will be muddy after wet weather. There are a couple of very short sections of road walking. Approximate time 2 hours.
Burton/Flixborough Circular Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.645068,-0.678194 A four mile gentle walk around the villages of Burton upon Stather and Flixborough in North Lincolnshire. The walk goes through arable farmland and woods and is mainly flat with one fairly gentle climb back into Burton. The area is well stocked with pheasant and partridge by the local gamekeeper and dogs should be kept under control when crossing the fields. Wild deer can also be occasionally seen in the area. There are no stiles but the steep slope of Burton Woods is unsuitable for pushchairs. A detour can be taken to shorten the walk and avoid the wooded area.
Rhosneigr Circular Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.225481,-4.515909 A circular walk around Llyn Maelog Lake and Traeth Llydan Beach. Mainly flat with some minor rocky outcrops which makes for a pleasant walk of 60/90 minutes. (not suitable for pushchairs). A variety of birds can be seen on the lake therefore binoculars and cameras are recommended. A long stretch of beach provides an ideal opportunity for some beach combing. The paths are well defined and easy to follow. One short area has grazing horses and donkeys with signs warning that dogs must be on leads in this section. The donkeys are friendly with humans but apparently not with dogs. RAF Valley is just to the west but there is no guarantee that Prince William will be seen on the walk.
Chipping Norton and Glyme Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.942874,-1.545312 A 4 mile loop from the pretty Cotswold market town of Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire. The walk heads out along the main road before turning onto an ancient lane which leads to fields and meadows past New Chalford Farm and then Glyme Farm. The views from this latter section of the walk give you a chance to really enjoy this part of the Cotswold Hills. The walk has only gentle climbs and descents and the paths are a mixture of pavements and field paths, the latter of which will be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles but several kissing gates and one narrow footbridge. One of the fields was holding both horses and young bulls when we passed through so take the usual precautions with dogs. Public toilets are available in the New Street long stay car park, close to the start of the walk. Approximate time 2 hours.
The Red Lion, Horsell Common and Mimbridge Meadows Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.323537,-0.571693 A 4 mile circular pub walk from The Red Lion in Horsell, Surrey. The Red Lion is a smart community pub where you can enjoy squashy sofas and real fires in the winter or the lovely sunny garden in the summer. The walking route explores the surrounding areas of quiet woodland and heath that make up Horsell Common as well as the pretty riverside fields of Mimbridge Meadows. The walk is almost entirely flat, with just a couple of gentle gradients. The woodland and meadow paths can get very muddy so good boots are a must (or wellingtons in the winter months). There are no stiles on route but you will need to negotiate several kissing gates, steps and footbridges. Some of the paths are quite narrow and can get a little overgrown in the summer. The route has limited road walking, but there are a few road crossings that need particular care (including the A3046 Chobham Road). Given the large number of small paths within the woodlands, the live GPS map on the iFootpath App will be very helpful in navigating the route. Allow 2 hours.
Chipping Norton and Over Norton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.940532,-1.547755 A 3 mile circular walk from the pretty market town of Chipping Norton in the Cotswold Hills in Oxfordshire. The walk follows the paths out past the church and earthwork remains of the castle, then it heads up along the Cleeves Path to Over Norton, before returning via farmland to the town. (The walk can be combined with ‘Chipping Norton and Glyme Valley' to make a 7 mile figure of eight walk.) The walk has a few steady climbs and descents. There are several kissing gates (some of which are a tight squeeze!) and one short wooden ladder stile (with a gap alongside suitable for most dogs). The streamside and farm paths will be very muddy after wet weather. One of the fields near Over Norton is likely to be holding cattle so take care with dogs. Public toilets are available in the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Wildmoor Heath Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.36092,-0.797479 This is a circular walk around Wildmoor Heath, alongside Edgbarrow Woods, Crowthorne. The walk is made up of woodland and heathland and there are many animals and birds to spot along the walk. Unless the weather has been extremely dry for a significant period wellies are advised as some areas are quite boggy. I have given this walk a difficulty of 2 as the terrain can be a little unstable underfoot. It is however a relatively flat walk, there are no stiles and just a few gates.
Black Down Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.06762,-0.684853 A 4.5 mile circular walk through the stunning landscape of Black Down, an area of heathland, copses and meadows high in the hills of West Sussex. Black Down is the highest point in West Sussex and the views are truly spectacular across the surrounding rolling landscape. In spring you'll enjoy carpets of bluebells and come July the site is famous for its mass of purple bilberries. The site is now owned and managed by the National Trust. The walk follows a mixture of heathland and woodland paths some of which are quite uneven with stone and trees roots and some of the sunken woodland paths remain quite muddy through many months of the year. There are several climbs and descents some of which are fairly steep. There are no stiles and just a handful of single gates. Cows are used through some of the year to help manage the heath, so take care with dogs, but it is quite unusual to see them in the massive expanse of heath and woodland. There are no refreshment or toilet facilities on the site. Approximate time 2 hours.
Two Becks and Shipley Glen Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.861711128,-1.810856645 This is a stroll in typical South Pennine countryside marked with dry stone walls, causeway, moorland, woodland, waterfall and reservoirs. You will mostly follow two becks across farm fields overlooking the Baildon Moor and Bingley Moor and then at the end will be the highlight of the journey, Shipley Glen. There are several kissing gates and stiles, including some over dry stone walls which are a little tricky to cross. You'll also be sharing some of the route with livestock so take care with dogs. Refreshments and toilets will be available at the Acorn pub as well as The Old Glen House pub.
Pen y Fan Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.872635,-3.486516 Pen y Fan is the highest peak in South Wales and southern Britain situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park. This is a challenging walk observing mountain scenery across Pen y Fan. There are clear paths marked all the way through this famous walk which has been featured on a number of television programmes. The mountain is also used by the military as part of the selection process of the UK's special forces personnel. The Brecon Beacons is a very remote/exposed area and it can be easy to lose your way, so remember the usual walking rules: be prepared with a paper map and compass as well as snacks/drinks and appropriate clothing/footwear.
Leeds Station Circular between river and canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.794898553,-1.547481716 This walk is ideal if you are in transit at the Leeds railway station and you need a bit of fresh air. It will take you between river and canal on a surprising journey. You will finish in the "Dark Arches" before returning to the train station.
Westbury White Horse and Imber Range Path Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.261106,-2.145724 A 4 mile circular walk through the chalk hills of Wiltshire. The route takes in the Westbury White Horse and the adjacent Bratton Camp Iron Age hill fort before descending to St James' Chuch in nearby Bratton and then climbing high into the hills to return via the Imber Range Path. The walk is quite exposed and strenuous but the stunning views are a just reward. The walk follows a mix of quiet country lanes and grass hillside paths/bridleways, some of which will be a little muddy and slippery after wet weather. There are several climbs and descents and one of the climbs is quite long and steep. There are sheep grazing in Bratton Camp. There are a number of kissing gates and one stile, which is quite high and is surrounded by wire mesh fencing, so most dogs will need a lift over. Just before you reach St James' Church you will also need to cross a stream. It is quite narrow and there are bricks and stones laid across the bed to help, but you will need waterproof boots! There are no toilet or refreshment facilities on the route but you do pass quite close to the village of Bratton and, if you're lucky, there may be an ice cream van at the car park at the start. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Norton Bavant and Scratchbury Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.187577,-2.13176 A circular walk of just more than 3 miles in the Wiltshire chalk hills starting from the tiny village of Norton Bavant. The walk climbs out and up to Scratchbury Hill, one of the finest Iron Age hill forts in Wiltshire, and then continues through arable farmland to return to the village. The views from Scratchbury Hill are really wonderful. The walk has several kissing gates but no stiles. There are several climbs and descents but they are all either gradual or short in nature. The chalk grassland paths are narrow and uneven and can be quite slippery after wet weather. There are sheep grazing in several of the fields so take care with dogs. The walk is quite remote so there are no toilets or refreshments on route. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Wicken Windmill and Fens Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.312268,0.299537 A 3 mile circular walk from the Cambridgeshire village of Wicken. The walk leaves the village through farmland to head south through a beautiful area of fenland with waterways, reedbeds and great views over flat open stretches of protected wildlife habitat. As you would expect through the fens, the walk is almost entirely flat. There are no stiles and just one kissing gate. The paths are a mixture of stone, tarmac and firm dirt tracks some of which can get muddy in the winter/after heavy rain. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Winkfield and Maidens Green Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.443419,-0.700585 A 3 mile circular walk around the footpaths and bridleways of the parish of Winkfield in Berkshire. The walk takes you round some of the old lanes and field paths with some beautiful old hedgerows and trees. The walk is relatively flat. There are 3 stiles (the first two of which are surrounded by wire mesh so dogs will need a lift over) plus 16 chain gates (V shaped squeeze gaps that are opened by pulling apart the metal upright poles) and 6 gates. There is one short section of road walking. Several of the paths are narrow, a little muddy and can be overgrown with nettles so shorts are not advised! One of the fields will probably be holding sheep so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Chichester Marina and Dell Quay Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.802875,-0.815505 A 4 mile figure of eight walk from the exclusive Chichester Marina in West Sussex. The walk leaves the marina via a small woodland copse before following the coastal path north to reach Dell Quay and then returning south alongside crop fields. Throughout you'll be able to enjoy the salty air from the harbour and the views across the coastline and inland across farmland. The walk is almost entirely flat, there are no stiles and just one kissing gate. There is one small section of road walking and you'll need to cross the marina lock via the footbridge over the lock gates. The walk is evenly split with about half on tarmac or stone lanes and half on field edge paths which can be muddy after wet weather. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Alkborough Flats Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.683964,-0.667605 A four mile walk from Alkborough village in North Lincolnshire, down to the Flats, a flood plain at the confluence of the River Trent and River Ouse as they flow into the Humber. The river embankmants were deliberately breached in 2006 as part of the flood defences for East Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. The area is a haven for wildlife and ideal for bird watching with Egrets, Shell Ducks, Reed Buntings and Swans all in evidence. The walk is mainly on level ground with one steep climb back up to Alkborough. The walk also includes Julian's Bower, a fine example of a turf cut maze thought to have been created by 13th century monks. The maze design can also be seen in the church porch in Alkborough. There are no stiles but a few kissing gates.
Goring and Hartslock Nature Reserve Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.521045,-1.132614 A 4 mile circular walk from Goring and Streatley rail station in Oxfordshire. The walk heads out along a quiet lane before cutting through Hartslock Nature Reserve and then returning along a beautiful stretch of the Thames Path. There's plenty of wildlife along the way and this stretch of the river is also likely to be busy with leisure boats. We were lucky enough to be able to watch the GB men's four rowing team in a pre-Olympics training session. The walk is flat except for one steep climb and descent across the nature reserve. There are no stiles but several gates and kissing gates. The Thames Path passes through one long field which will probably be holding cattle so take care here with dogs. The Thames Path can get muddy in winter/after wet weather so wear suitable footwear at these times. There are toilets available at the station. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Centenary Way (Warks) Day One Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.56081,-1.69995 Kingsbury Water Park to Hartshill Hayes Country Park. The first section of the Warwickshire Centenary Way. This walk uses public rights of way across arable and livestock farmland so there are a number of stiles and kissing gates to negotiate. It is a quiet, sometimes isolated section of the Centenary Way, but several small villages are visited and there are a number of inns and pubs along the way.
Grantchester Village and Meadows Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.180846,0.093401 A 6 mile circular walk starting from the village of Grantchester, just south of Cambridge in Cambridgeshire. The walk crosses in and out of the centre of village exploring farmland to the east, Byron's Pool nature reserve to the south and Grantchester Meadows which run alongside the River Cam to the north. As a result there's a lovely mix with something for everyone, from rare species of plants and birds, fabulous views, chances for a paddle and an opportunity to take afternoon tea at the famous Grantchester Orchard. The walk is almost entirely flat. There are no stiles but a number of gates and kissing gates plus a number of steps to get over one of the bridges. The paths are a mixture of concrete, tarmac, riverbank paths and grass/mud farm tracks, the latter of which will be muddy after wet weather. The riverside meadows are used to graze cattle so take care with dogs here, although the meadows are very wide so you can give the cattle a wide berth if you need to. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Ely Cathedral and River Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.39898,0.266082 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the beautiful cathedral city of Ely in Cambridgeshire. The walk leaves the market square to head out along an ancient lane to reach a viewing point at Rowsell Pits nature reserve, before returning along the River Great Ouse and through the city gardens. There's a chance to visit the famous cathedral, great views across the nature reserve and you can enjoy the tranquillity of this stretch of the river. The walk is mostly flat with just one descent as you leave the market place and then one long and steady climb through Jubilee Park to reach the cathedral. There are no stiles, two kissing gates and a number of steps to cross over the footbridge. The paths are a mixture of pavements and tarmac/stone park paths which are all well made. The meadow alongside the river is often used to graze cattle so take care with dogs as you pass through here. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Cambridge City Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.214152,0.111851 A 4 mile circular trail around the university city of Cambridge. You'll have chance to enjoy many of the famous parks and open spaces including Jesus Green and Parker's Piece, see the beautiful architecture of many of the famous university colleges and also see the range of bridges that cross over the River Cam throughout the city. The walk is almost entirely flat, with just one steady hill at the start. There are no stiles or gates and only a few steps. The walk follows well made tarmac paths making it suitable for pushchairs. There are public toilets available on Jesus Green, Midsummer Common (on Victoria Avenue) and Parker's Piece. Approximate time 2 hours (plus extra time if you wish to visit any museums/attractions).
Wigginton and Grand Union Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.800486,-0.621177 A 6 mile circular walk starting from Tring rail station in Hertfordshire. The walk heads up into the Chilterns and through the village of Wigginton before returning along a picturesque section of the Grand Union Canal. The walk has just a few steady climbs and descents. There are no stiles but many kissing gates and a few steps. The paths are a mixture of stone, tarmac and grass, some of which will be muddy after wet weather. The walk passes through a large horse paddock so take care with dogs at this point. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Lynsted and Kent's Orchards Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.313548,0.786432 A 4 mile circular trail from the small village of Lynsted in Kent. Exploring this part of Kent will help you to understand why it is known as ‘The Garden of England' as you pass through orchards of cherries, plums, apples and pears along with fields of strawberries. The Plough Inn is ideally placed half way round the walk - a great place to take a break with a pint or delicious lunch. The walk is a relatively flat and is a mixture of road walking on quiet country lanes and field walking through the orchards and pastures. Some of the fields will be holding sheep so take care with dogs. There are a number of gates and three stiles all with wire mesh surrounds with just a medium-size gap underneath for dogs (our standard poodle just squeezed through). Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Melbury Beacon and Downs Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.967865,-2.163537 A short but fairly strenuous circular walk taking in a chalk downland area of natural beauty which is managed by the National Trust. The walk starts from Spread Eagle Hill and heads out climbing quite steeply to the top of Melbury Hill, giving views for miles around across the surrounding downland, and then returning along Compton Down. The area is well known for its butterflies, orchids and glow-worms. The walk follows paths around the steep sloping downland and the paths will get slippery and muddy after wet weather. There are two stiles and a couple of gates. The first stile is open underneath for dogs to pass through, but the second stile is more enclosed so dogs may need a lift over and it also has a steep drop on the opposite side so some people may also need a hand! Dogs are welcome on the downs as long as they are under close control as the area is grazed with cattle. The area is very isolated so there are no refreshment or toilet facilities. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Shaftesbury and Gold Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.006632,-2.19749 A four mile circular walk from the beautiful Dorset town of Shaftesbury, near the Wiltshire border. The walk gives you chance to enjoy the lovely mix of thatched and stone properties in the town, follows stretches of quiet country lanes towards the downs in the south and also visits the two main view points in the town where you'll enjoy views stretching northwest to Glastonbury Tor and south to Melbury Hill and beyond. Of course, no walk through Shaftesbury would be complete without a stroll down Gold Hill, the cobbled hill made famous in many photographs and, most memorably, in the 1973 Hovis TV Advert. Shaftesbury sits high above sea level on a chalk ridge. The walk follows the streets and lanes heading south into the chalk downlands meaning there are several steady slopes and one steep section both climbing and descending. The route follows a mix of pavements, quiet country lanes with no pavements and a few field paths which can get muddy after wet weather. There are a couple of gates plus one stile, which is quite tall and has just a small gap under the gate alongside for dogs. You may come across cattle in one of the fields. Approximate time 2 hours.
Lightwater Country Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.351264,-0.684034 Lightwater Country Park is situated on the edge of Lightwater Village and extends to 59 hectares. The Country Park is predominately heathland habitat, but there are also ponds, woodland, shrubs and lowland bog. These habitats offer the opportunity to observe a wide variety of wildlife, birds, mammals, plants and insects. Dog walkers should note that due to the ground nesting birds in the heath, dogs are to be kept on leads from 1st March – 31st July for a small section of the walk. There are no stiles or gates and just one fairly steep but short climb up a stepped woodland path near the start. There are toilets available at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1 hour.
Foul End Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.515747,-1.668055 A circular route from Shustoke Reservoir to Foul End, near Coleshill. The walk is a mixture of field walking and road walking. There are two stiles plus several gates and some of the fields will be holding both cattle and horses so take care with dogs.
Coleshill Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.502712,-1.702377 A 6.3 mile circular walk starting and finishing at Coleshill, Warwickshire. The walk follows a mixture of field paths and country tracks with some road walking. There are many gates on route plus one stile. At least one of the fields is likely to be holding cattle so take care with dogs.
Tweseldown Racecourse Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.258863,-0.820456 A short walk looping through the 130 acres of Tweseldown Racecourse, one of Britain's premier horse trials venues. The course was home to the equestrian dressage and eventing competitions in the 1948 Summer Olympics. The centre of the racecourse is available for walkers to use when trials are not taking place (check the trails dates on the website at www.tweseldown.co.uk). Horses can be present at any time so please ensure they are given right of way. Dogs are welcome but please keep them under control to ensure there is no damage caused to the cross country facilities. The walk has only a few gentle climbs, the paths are mainly sand or grass and there are no gates or stiles. Approximate time 1 hour.
Burley and Shappen Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.82476,-1.69729 A 2.3 mile circular walk across a beautiful section of heathland within the New Forest starting from the village of Burley. Roaming with the famous New Forest ponies you'll follow the paths through the heath alongside Shappen Bottom before following a short section of an old railway and then returning via Shappen Hill. There are no stiles or gates and the climbs and descents are all quite gentle. The heath paths will be muddy after wet weather and you will share them with free roaming ponies and cattle. As with any area of heathland take care with dogs to avoid disturbing ground nesting birds and adders. Approximate time 1 hour.
Bude Canal Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.827121,-4.546044 A 3.5 mile circular and easy walk following the Bude Canal in Cornwall. The walk leaves Bude to head south along the canal towpath before returning along the land alongside the River Neet. The route passes though both the Bude Marshes Local Nature Reserve (with extensive reed beds) and Petherick's Mill Environmental Area (with many ditches and dykes), making it particularly popular with bird watchers. The walk is almost entirely flat and follows well made tarmac paths. There are no stiles and just one gate plus a couple of crossings over the A39 which can be quite busy with traffic. Public toilets are available at the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Padstow and Camel Estuary Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.539899,-4.941864 A 3.5 mile circular route from the picturesque town of Padstow on the north coast of Cornwall. The walk gives you the chance to explore the heart of the small Cornish town, before climbing out to follow the coastal path alongside the estuary of the River Camel. The route then returns along arable field paths and farm tracks passing the old manor house of Prideaux Place. Within the town you'll have chance to explore the many quaint small shops, cafes and pubs or take a boat trip and once you're out onto the coastal path the views are really breathtaking. The walk follows a mixture of pavements, quiet tarmac lanes, stone paths and field side paths, the latter of which will be muddy after wet weather and can also be quite overgrown. The walk has several short steep climbs and also a couple of very long gradual climbs. There is one (very tight!) kissing gate by the church plus three stone stiles (these are relatively easy to climb but dogs may need a leg up on one of them). There are public toilets in the car park at the start and plenty of places for refreshment within the town. Approximate time 2 hours.
Malham Tarn via Gordale Scar Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.0586771562707,-2.15403031226508 A 6.2 mile walk passing through some wonderful limestone scenery as it visits the iconic Yorkshire Dales sites of Janet's Foss, Gordale Scar, Malham Tarn and Malham Cove. The walk follows a mixture of roads and dale paths. There are several climbs, a few stiles and there are also a couple of short scrambles.
Bodmin Moor and Cheesewring Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.514079,-4.456212 A 3.5 mile fairly strenuous circular walk on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall. The walk starts from Minions, the highest village in Cornwall, and heads out onto Bodmin Moor. The moor gives you the wild exposed landscape you might expect and the route takes you up and over the granite rocks to reach the famous rock formation of Cheesewring, before returning through the moor where you'll see plenty of evidence of the copper mining that once thrived here. The walk follows tracks and open areas of Bodmin Moor which, as you would expect, will be very wet and boggy after wet weather so good waterproof boots are a must. The tracks are rocky and uneven underfoot and the climb to Cheesewring will involve a short scramble over large granite blocks. At this high point in Cornwall, the walk is very exposed so make sure you are well prepared. Bodmin Moor is home to free roaming horses, cattle, sheep and ponies so take particular care with dogs. There are no stiles or gates. Approximate time 2 hours.
Caradon Hill and the Copper Mines Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.51374,-4.455511 A 4.5 mile fairly strenuous circular walk across Caradon Hill on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall. The walk starts from Minions, the highest village in Cornwall, and heads out onto Caradon Hill, following the well made track around the hill edge on the easy outgoing section. The walk route then climbs to the hill's summit before descending through old quarries and tin/copper mines to reach the stream in the valley and follows this stream through farmland to return to the village. There are plenty of spectacular views throughout and you'll also have chance to explore the ruins of the mining industry that shaped this part of Cornwall in the 1800s. The walk is very exposed so make sure you are well prepared. Caradon Hill is home to free roaming horses, sheep and ponies so take particular care with dogs. The walk follows tracks and open areas of Bodmin Moor which, as you would expect, will be very wet and boggy after wet weather so good waterproof boots are a must. Some of the tracks are rocky and uneven underfoot and after periods of rain the tracks running alongside the stream can be standing in an inch or two of water. The first stretch of path following the stream is very rocky and you will need to scramble for just a short distance. The second section following the stream across the fields can be very muddy. There are two stiles (both with easy crossing points for dogs) plus a few gates. Approximate time 2-3 hours, depending on the conditions underfoot.
Lydford and Fernworthy Down Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.643496,-4.108546 A 4.5 mile circular walk around Lydford in Devon. The walk starts from near the centre of the village and heads out along the main road and then along a part of the Granite Way and West Devon Way. The return leg of the walk is across Dartmoor via stone tracks crossing rivers and streams. As you would expect, the walk across Dartmoor can be very wet and boggy after wet weather so good waterproof boots are a must. The Dartmoor tracks are rocky and uneven underfoot in places. Dartmoor is home to free roaming horses, cattle, sheep and ponies so take particular care with dogs. There are no stiles and two gates. Approximate time 2 hours.
Tintagel and Barras Nose Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.66209,-4.748052 A 3.5 mile circular walk along the coastline at Tintagel on the north Cornish coast. The cliff top route will give you spectacular views across this section of the Atlantic coast and of course you'll also be able to enjoy the famous local myths and legends. The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with the legends surrounding King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to tourists from many parts of the world and is one of the most-visited places in Britain. The walk follows some steep sections of the coast path with lots of steps and some uneven rocky, slippery surfaces. Some of the fields you pass through will be holding cattle and the cliff edge fields are home to goats, horses and cattle so take care with dogs. There are seven stiles (a mixture of stone and wooden), all of which should be easy for most dogs to negotiate, plus a few gates. There are public toilets available in the car park at the start and also at the castle gift shop half way round. Approximate time 2 hours.
Crackington Haven and Cambeak Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.740902,-4.632814 A breathtaking (in more ways than one!) 4 mile circular walk along a section of the north Cornwall coast. The walk starts from the small village of Crackington Haven. Crackington Haven is popular with campers, walkers and geology students. The surrounding cliffs are well known for their visible folded sedimentary rock formations. The village gives its name to the Crackington formation, a sequence of sandstones and greyshales. The walk follows a fairly challenging route of the coastal path with lots of steep sections and steps climbing and descending throughout. There are free roaming goats and cattle on the coastal path so take care with dogs. The return leg runs alongside a stream within an ancient woodland and these paths can be very muddy after wet weather. There are three stiles, all with adjacent dog gates, and several kissing gates. There are public toilets just across the road from the car park. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Bodmin Moor, Cheesewring and Caradon Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.513443,-4.455725 An 8 mile fairly strenuous circular walk on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall. (Note this walk combines the two shorter loops – ‘Bodmin Moor and Cheesewring' and ‘Caradon Hill and the Copper Mines') which are also published on iFootpath). The walk starts from Minions, the highest village in Cornwall, and heads out onto Bodmin Moor. The moor gives you the wild exposed landscape you might expect and the route takes you up and over the granite rocks to reach the famous rock formation of Cheesewring, before returning through the moor where you'll see plenty of evidence of the copper mining that once thrived here. Once back in the village the walk heads out onto Caradon Hill, following the well made track around the hill edge on an easier section of walking. The walk route then climbs to the hill's summit before descending through old quarries and tin/copper mines to reach the stream in the valley and follows this stream through farmland to return to the village. At this high point in Cornwall, the walk is very exposed so make sure you are well prepared. The walk follows tracks and open areas of Bodmin Moor which, as you would expect, will be very wet and boggy after wet weather so good waterproof boots are a must. The tracks are rocky and uneven underfoot and the climb to Cheesewring will involve a short scramble over large granite blocks, and there is a second scramble alongside the stream during the second half. The section following the stream across the fields can be very muddy. There are two stiles (both with easy crossing points for dogs) plus a few gates. Bodmin Moor is home to free roaming horses, cattle, sheep and ponies so take particular care with dogs. Approximate time 4 to 5 hours, depending on the conditions underfoot.
Exeter City Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.718583,-3.531175 A short walk of 3 miles through the ancient city of Exeter following, in part, the city wall of which 70% is still standing. The walk starts at the popular quayside area and passes by the cathedral and through the spectacular Northernhay Gardens with its many statues and Norman castle. A city in the location of Exeter probably existed before 250BC, with a Roman city founded in AD 50. It has always been an important city for trading and commerce through Saxon, Norman, Elizabethan, the industrial revolution and modern times when it has been described as one of the ten most profitable places for a business to be located in the UK. Previously regarded as second only to Bath as an architectural site, since the bombing of World War II and subsequent reconstruction Exeter has been a city with some beautiful buildings rather than a beautiful city. The walk is mostly flat except for the ascent and decent to the quay, and follows well made tarmac paths. There are several road crossings which can be quite busy with traffic. Public toilets are available at the quay at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Bovey Tracey and the Parke Estate Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.591052,-3.676672 A 4 mile circular trail from Bovey Tracey on the edge of Dartmoor, passing through the Parke Estate. The outward leg runs through a beautiful section of wild woodland alongside a picturesque section of the River Bovey and then climbs to return through fields and wild meadows and a short section of the disused railway. The area is very popular with dog walkers and there are plenty of opportunities for a paddle on a hot day. The walk follows woodland, riverside and meadow paths all of which can be quite muddy after periods of wet weather. The walk is relatively flat but has one steady long climb half way through. There are several kissing gates and two stiles, both of which have adjacent dog gates. There are public toilets both in the car park at the start and also within the Parke Estate, on the return leg. Approximate time 2 hours.
Northam Burrows Country Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.052682,-4.22973 A 3.5 miles easy and circular trail along the North Devon coast within the Northam Burrows Country Park. Northam Burrows, just on the outskirts of Westward Ho!, is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. It is about 253 hectares of grassy coastal plain with salt marsh, sand dunes and generally unimproved grasslands. The walk starts along the edge of the pebble beach and then follows the mouth of the Taw Torridge Estuary around to the west before turning inland to cross the Burrows back to the start. The walk is almost entirely flat, and there are no stiles or gates. The surfaces are a mixture of sand dunes and grassy marshes. The marshes can be quite wet underfoot and after periods of rain you will need to stride over the drainage ditches as part of the return leg. There are free roaming Exmoor Ponies and sheep on the Burrows so take care with dogs. The centre of the Burrows is a golf course and you will need to cross a couple of fairways on the return leg so watch out for golf balls. There are toilets available at the information centre near the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Meldon Reservoir and Black Tor Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.707729,-4.038841 A 5 mile circular and fairly strenuous walk through typical Dartmoor landscape in Devon. The walk begins with a crossing over the Meldon Reservoir dam and then follows the path alongside the reservoir to meet the West Okement River. The return leg climbs high onto Dartmoor to Sharp Tor and then follows the track along and around Longstone Hill to return to the start. As with any walking on Dartmoor, the area is very exposed so make sure you are well prepared. The paths are rocky underfoot and there are areas of marshy ground so good waterproof boots are a must. After periods of rain some of the tracks can be running with an inch or two of water. There are free roaming sheep, cattle, horses and ponies on Dartmoor so take care with dogs. There are several steady slopes throughout plus one very steep climb over granite rocks up to Sharp Tor itself. There are no stiles and just a couple of gates. Toilets are available in the car park at the start. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Roadford Lake Park Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.687936,-4.231778 A 2 mile easy circular trail within Roadford Lake Country Park in Devon. The trail follows the paths alongside the large lake giving beautiful views before turning away to return through a section of woodland. The walk has only one long but gentle climb and follows well made tarmac and stone tracks. There are no stiles or kissing gates, just a couple of single gates, so it would be possible to take a pushchair round. There are toilet facilities and a cafe at the car park at the start. Dogs are welcome but must be kept on a lead. There is a fenced woodland area next to the car park where dogs can be exercised off lead. Approximate time 1 hour.
Cardinham Woods Callywith Loop Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.469586,-4.678911 A 3 mile circular loop around the steep valley woodland of Cardinham Woods. The walk climbs gradually into the high valley sides to reach a view point over the river below, and then follows a gradual descent to return to the start point. Popular with dog walkers, the tracks give an excellent opportunity to enjoy beautiful isolated woodland. The walk begins with a gradual but very long climb and the second half follows the equivalent descent. All the tracks are quite well made with stone/grass but can be just a little muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles or gates. There are toilets and a cafe available at the start. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Cardinham Woods Hurtstocks Loop Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.469779,-4.678474 A 2.5 mile circular loop around the steep valley woodland of Cardinham Woods. The walk follows a level track alongside Cardinham Water before taking a steep climb high into the valley sides to reach the remains of Wheal Glynn Mine, an old silver and lead mine. The walk then returns to the valley bottom for the return leg. Popular with dog walkers, the tracks give an excellent opportunity to enjoy beautiful woodland and the rushing stream. The majority of the walk is on a level track but there is one fairly steep climb to reach the mine. All the tracks are quite well made with stone/grass but can be just a little muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles or gates. There are toilets and a cafe available at the start. Approximate time 1 hour.
South Malverns Loop Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.041039,-2.342443 An 11 mile circuit of the Malvern Hills, Worcestershire, starting at the Swinbrook Car Park and terminating at the highest point on the Malverns, the Worcestershire Beacon (1,395 ft). There are stunning views into Wales and across the Worcestershire plain. Refreshments are available along the route. There are some steep sections along the trail, and the higher ground can be very exposed to inclement weather.
Thomas Hardy Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.686461,-2.548988 A six mile circular walk within the Dorset Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Starting at the Thomas Hardy monument which is a memorial to Rear Admiral Masterman Hardy (1769-1839), best known as the Captain of HMS Victory at the battle of Trafalgar (1805). The monument is 22 metres high and was built in 1844/5. The walk has excellent views of Weymouth, Portland Bill and Chesil Beech and has one rather steep climb as well as several stiles and gates.
Queen Elizabeth Country Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.961608,-0.977704 A 5 mile circular woodland walk through the beautiful Queen Elizabeth Country Park in Hampshire. Forming part of the South Downs, the park is within the East Hampshire Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It contains 2,000 acres of open access woodland and downland and was mostly planted in the 1930s. The park is popular with dog walkers, horse riders and mountain bikers and with dedicated routes for each, everyone has the chance to enjoy their own space in the tranquil woodland. The walk follows a mixture of stone, grass and dirt tracks and paths through the woodland. Some of these are uneven with tree roots and some areas can be very muddy after wet weather. There is one steep but fairly short climb at the start of the walk and then long and more gentle ascents and descents throughout. There are no stiles or gates and the walk follows a waymarked route (marked with a purple footprint on a green background) making it very easy to follow. There is a cafe and toilets at the start of the walk. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Caerketton Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.890962,-3.201457 A 3 mile circular walk which takes you up Caerketton Hill where you will be rewarded with excellent views across Edinburgh, Arthur's Seat, Lothian coast, Bass Rock, the Lammermuir Hills, the rest of the Pentlands and across the Firth of Forth to Fife. The route includes a fairly long climb to the top of Caerketton Hill and some of the paths will be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles and just a few gates.
Allermuir Hill and Swanston village Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.890639,-3.201152 A 4 mile 2-2.5 hour circular walk into the Pentlands National Park with outstanding views over the Pentlands and the City of Edinburgh. The walk takes you up Caerketton and Allermuir Hills and through the hamlet of Swanston with it's charming thatched and whitewashed cottages. You will be rewarded with excellent views across Edinburgh, Arthur's Seat, Lothian coast, Bass Rock, the Lammermuir Hills, the rest of the Pentlands and across the Firth of Forth to Fife. The route includes a fairly long climb to the tops of Caerketton and Allermuir Hills and some of the paths will be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles and just a few gates.
Loch Eilean Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 57.175664,-3.817205 A leisurely circular walk from the Rothiemurchus visitor centre just North of Aviemore. The first half is along a minor road/path, then head right into the Rothiemurchus forest to Loch Eilean. The walk then heads onwards through the forest onto the B970 which takes you back to the visitor centre.
Smeathe's Ridge and Burderop Down Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.483561,-1.776373 A 5 mile circular walk from Barbary Castle Country Park, near Swindon in Wiltshire. This peaceful walk explores the stunning Marlborough Downs, taking in a long stretch of the Ridgeway National Trail before returning via bridleways alongside typical Wiltshire arable fields and pastures. The view from the ridge stretches for miles around on a clear day and there is plenty of wildlife to enjoy on the chalk downland as well as in the dense hedgerows on the return leg. The route includes very gentle but long gradients throughout, with just one short steeper climb. As the walk follows bridleways for its entire length, there are no stiles, steps or kissing gates to negotiate, just a few simple bridle gates. The ridge top path on the outward leg is firm and wide, but the lower bridleways on the return leg are much narrower and can be a bit overgrown in the summer months and very muddy in winter. You will be sharing three of the fields with dairy cattle, but the paths are well-walked (particularly the National Trail) and our experience was that the cattle didn't even seem to notice us (or our dog) as we walked through. All the same, do take care around the cattle. There are picnic tables and toilets within the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
Climbing Ingleborough Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.117899644562,-2.3930599624869 Ingleborough is probably the most interesting mountain in the Yorkshire Dales and the climb from Clapham the best way up. The low level start passes through woodland, Ingleborough Cave, through troll Gill before Gaping Gill is passed. The summit plateau is extensive and featureless so care should be taken in mist to find the correct way down. There are good paths throughout the walk but some steep climbing and potentially boggy ground on the way down.
Cosgrove and River Tove Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.08509,-0.851702 A 2.4 mile circular walk taking in the tiny Northamptonshire village of Cosgrove and a section of the River Tove. The walk follows a peaceful stretch of the Grand Union Canal towpath south to the village and then returns via pastures alongside the meandering River Tove. The walk is almost entirely flat, but the narrow towpath and the paths through pastures are likely to be muddy after wet weather. There is also a section (about one third of a mile) of road walking along a road without pavements. There are several gates including some kissing gates and two stiles, one of which is quite high with enclosed wire fencing around so dogs may need a lift over. You may be sharing some of the pastures with cows and sheep so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1 hour.
Monmouth and the Kymin Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.809052,-2.71995 A circular route starting and ending at Monmouth and taking in sections of the Wye Valley Way and Offa's Dyke footpaths. Some steep climbing is rewarded by stunning views into Wales. Most of the walking is easy, with a delightful stretch along the River Wye but there is one prolonged hill climb after Redbrook.
Hermitage of Braid Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.919418,-3.210752 A 2 mile circular walk through the forest of the Hermitage of Braid. The woodland paths can be muddy after wet weather. There is one kissing gate and one stile on route.
Foxton and Lubenham Fields Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.501817,-0.97141 A 5 mile circular walk through rural Leicestershire, near Market Harborough, taking in the arable fields and pastures and finishing along a short section of the Grand Union Canal. The walk is relatively flat and follows field paths in the main, which will be very muddy after wet weather. The crop fields can become a bit more challenging to cross close to harvest time and the pastures will be holding cattle and sheep so take care with dogs. There are several kissing gates and 13 stiles (all of which have open fencing or adjacent lifting gates for dogs but some are quite high for the humans!). Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
The Lapworth Loop Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.336109,-1.72149 An easy-paced eleven mile circuit around south Warwickshire taking in canal-side walking, woodland paths, and arable farmland plus some road walking. The route passes close to two National Trust properties at Baddesley Clinton and Packwood House. There are several gates on route plus four stiles.
Roslin Glen and Chapel Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.853253,-3.163515 This is a two hour 4 mile circular along the river North Esk from Roslin Country Park to Polton village and back to Roslin village. Roslin Glen is particularly scenic and steeped in history.
Sampford Courtenay to Okehampton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.770154,-3.948342 An 8 mile linear walk from Sampford Courtenay to Okehampton with a train journey on the Dartmoor Railway in the opposite direction. It is easiest to begin with the seven minute train journey from Okehampton Station to Sampford Courtenay (limited timetables apply so check before you plan your walk at www.dartmoor-railway.co.uk). The return walking route gives a lovely mix of scenery. The first 3 miles follow a quiet lane through Devon countryside to reach the beautiful village of Belstone. The route then continues heading high into Dartmoor passing by Belstone Tor and crossing the East Okement River before returning through farmland to reach Okehampton. The walk follows a mixture of quiet tarmac lanes (there are no pavements so take care of traffic), rocky tracks through Dartmoor (wear sturdy boots to protect your ankles!) and grass paths through hills and valleys (which will be muddy after wet weather). The paths across Dartmoor are quite exposed so make sure you are well prepared for the walk with clothing, drinks and food. There are no stiles, just a few gates and you will be sharing many of the paths with sheep so take care with dogs. There are many climbs and descents throughout. Toilets and refreshments are available at Okehampton Station. Approximate time 4 hours (excluding the train journey).
Shareshill to Brewood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.656773,-2.083812 This walk takes you between two Staffordshire villages and uses paths, bridleways and tow paths with less than 850 metres of its thirteen and half kilometres on roads, all of which are quiet country lanes. Although the route is fairly flat, it is advisable to take a map and compass as many of the paths are little used and some cross very large fields indeed, with way markers only at their edges. The walk should take between 3 and 4 hours, but can be broken up into smaller chunks to suit all abilities. Most of the farmland is arable, but there horses and some cows in fields adjacent to the route. A note of caution is that because the route is so little used, many paths are very overgrown and long trousers are a must! I have graded this walk as a 3, simply because of the navigation requirements, but in terms of the difficulty of the terrain it is probably a maximum 2.
Guildford and the River Wey Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.235691,-0.572739 A 2 mile circular walk from Guildford town centre taking in the beautiful centre of Surrey's historic county town along with a surprisingly peaceful stretch of the River Wey. You'll have chance to see Guildford's famous cobbled High Street plus Guildford Castle along with the picturesque River Wey where on summer days you'll see narrow boats, rowing boats and canoes all messing about on the river. The walk is mainly flat with just a few gentle hills including the High Street itself. There are no stiles and just a couple of kissing gates plus a few steps. The surfaces are mainly well made tarmac paths but the stretch along the river and through the meadows can be muddy after wet weather. There are likely to be cattle grazing in Shalford Meadows so take care with dogs. The castle grounds are locked at dusk. There are public toilets at the start of the walk just behind the Cornmarket and plenty of places for refreshments within the town. Approximate time 1 hour.
Batchworth Lake and the Grand Union Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.632742,-0.474811 A 3.5 mile circular walk from Rickmansworth's Aquadrome running alongside the local waterways. Covering 100 acres, the Aquadrome Local Nature Reserve consists of lakes, grassland and woodland and is an ideal place for walks. The walk heads out along a stretch of the Grand Union Canal before turning to run alongside the railway to reach Rickmansworth town centre and on through the Aquadrome Local Nature Reserve to reach the start point. Throughout the walk you'll enjoy a real mix of waterside environments, from bustling towpaths with locks and colourful narrow boats, to peaceful rivers with plenty of wildlife and also the busy water activity centre with sailing and water skiing on show. The walk is almost entirely flat throughout and there are no gates or stiles. The surfaces are a mixture of well made tarmac and stone paths and woodland dirt tracks, the latter of which can be muddy after wet weather (and can also be a little overgrown). There are toilets and a cafe near the car park. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Braidburn Valley Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.919283,-3.213178 A one mile circular walk through Braidburn Valley Park, a steep grassy valley cut in two by the Braid Burn which flows north from the Pentland Hills to the Firth of Forth. The Park covers 11 hectares making it the fourth biggest Community Park in Edinburgh. In 2007, it was awarded Scotland's first Green Flag for excellence in parks.
Hebden Beck & Grimwith Reservoir Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.063309289082,-1.9626092190057 A walk covering one of the prettiest rivers in the Dales, history in the form of some old lead mining works and chimney and a circuit of Grimwith Reservoir with fantastic birdlife throughout. Mainly on good tracks/paths or lanes with an intermittent path down to the reservoir. A few sections are quite steep.
Pentland Ridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.860843,-3.332612 A 3 hour circular walk that is one of the most popular in the Pentlands taking in West Kip, East Kip and the highest peak in the Pentlands, Scald Law.
Essington Quarry Pool and Black Cat wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.623424,-2.068781 This is a relatively gentle and very popular two mile walk through farmland between Wolverhampton and Essington in South Staffordshire. The walk provides views of Wednesfield, Wolverhampton and the Black Country to the south and the Wrekin and the Clee Hills to the south west. There are no steep parts to the walk, although a fair amount of gentle uphill. Paths are well trodden and it is difficult to get lost. Although the walk is along marked public footpaths there is some livestock in the form of horses and cows so it is advisable to leash dogs. The local farmer through whose land the walk takes you is very friendly as are the local birdwatchers who use the large pool. Half way through the walk is a conveniently situated bench, but there are no toilets or other facilities in the area. The walk is easily achieved in an hour, but there are plenty of other paths that might take your fancy on the route.
Sandwich and Royal St George's Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.275395,1.343805 A 4 mile circular walk from the pretty Kent town of Sandwich. The walk starts from the quayside in the town and heads out along the paths running alongside the River Stour and then through the championship golf course of Royal St George to reach the beach, before turning back in land to pass through farm land back to the town. The walk is almost entirely flat and there are no stiles, just a few kissing gates. The paths are a mixture of tarmac paths and grass/dirt paths across the golf course and fields and so some of the route can be muddy after wet weather. One of the fields is likely to be holding sheep so take care with dogs. There are public toilets in the car park at the start. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Osterley Park and the Grand Union Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.488945,-0.347567 A 5 mile circular walk starting from Osterley Park, one of the largest open spaces in the western suburbs of London. The walk will take you through a mixture of parkland, industrial landscapes, a beautiful section of the Grand Union Canal and then back through residential streets and arable farmland to reach the park once again. The walk is relatively flat throughout with no significant inclines. There are no stiles and just a few kissing gates (one of which is quite tight!). The paths are a mixture of pavements, stone and gravel tracks and grass/dirt paths and some of the latter can be muddy and/or a little overgrown at some times of the year. Whilst some sections of the walk do follow roads, there are pavements so no road walking is required. There is one railway crossing (a crossing with no signals or barriers) so take particular care here. There are public toilets available in Osterley Park near the mansion. Approximate time 2 hours.
Grove Ferry and Kent's Orchards Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.323123,1.207847 A 6 mile circular walk from the Grove Ferry picnic site, near Upstreet in Kent. The route follows a short section of the River Great Stour and then strikes out across arable fields to reach the pretty village of West Stourmouth, before completing a circuit of the local orchards passing through the village of East Stourmouth and back to the picnic area. Several miles of the walk are through Kent's orchards and, with a mix of apples, pears, plums and raspberries, it is a great demonstration of why Kent is known as the Garden of England. The walk is almost entirely flat and follows field and orchard paths, all of which will be muddy after wet weather and can be a little overgrown. There is just one low stile (with adjacent dog gate) which you will cross twice plus a few kissing gates. There are public toilets available at the car park at the start. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Hanging Tree Trail, Newcastleton Forest Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.1847,-2.777641 This route is a 2 and a half mile circular walk located in the Newcastleton Forest which follows the Drove Trail for part of the way and then returns through an area of old, well established woodland passing the 'hanging tree'.
Braid Hills Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.915055,-3.204582 A one mile circular walk around the Braid Hills, one of the seven hills of Edinburgh. The walk heads out with a superb view of Edinburgh, Arthur's Seat and the Braid Hills golf course to your left and then heads back along tracks though the gorse. There are many paths to get from one end of the Braid Hills and back again to your start position, this one includes the summit of the Braid Hill at 213m.
Harlaw reservoir Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.860793,-3.332815 A 3 mile circular walk around Harlaw reservoir, a small reservoir in the Pentland Hills. Harlaw reservoir was constructed 1843-48 in front of the larger Threipmuir Reservoir, 7½ miles (12 km) southwest of Edinburgh. It was built 1843-48 for the Edinburgh Water Company by their engineer James Jardine (1776 - 1858), but is no longer involved in public water supply. The Harlaw and Threipmuir reservoirs now provide essential upstream flood storage to prevent flooding of the Water of Leith, and many rainbow trout for local anglers.
Linns Trail, Newcastleton Forest Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.178321,-2.783721 This route is a 5 mile circular walk located in the Newcastleton Forest. It is relatively flat and follows gravel paths for most of its course. The Linns trail drops down into a wooded valley, criss-crossed with burns and alive with wildlife. Highlight of the trail is the Border stane. This sculpted stone (stane being Scots for stone) has the words of Jerusalem on the side facing England and Auld Lang Syne on the Scottish side. The trail then heads out to a ruined cottage at Tweedenhead where on sunny days common lizards can be seen scuttling amongst the stones beside the bridge.
Broadstairs to Margate: The Dickens and Turner Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.360566,1.433745 A 6 mile linear trail running from Broadstairs rail station to Margate rail station in east Kent. The return leg can be completed with just a six minute train journey. The walk begins with an exploration of Broadstairs' sea front with its beautiful beach and the promenade set on the low cliff edge with a wide range of shops, hotels, cafes and restaurants. The route continues heading out through the small village of St Peter's and through open farmland to reach Margate. Here you'll have chance to see the traditional British seaside resort with its beautiful expanse of golden sand. Broadstairs has strong connections with the writer Charles Dickens and Margate is closely associated the artist JMW Turner and throughout the walk you'll have chance to learn more about these two icons of British cultural history. The walk is almost entirely flat and there are no stiles or gates. The paths are all well made tarmac or stone surfaces which are in most part wide but do narrow quite a lot through the open farmland and so it may be tight for wider pushchairs. There are public toilets in Crofts Place in Broadstairs, just off the High Street, about five minutes into the walk. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours, plus extra time to explore any of the attractions.
Bakethin North Shore Walk - Kielder Forest Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.227237,-2.581277 Kielder Forest is a large forest in Northumberland, surrounding the reservoir Kielder Water. It is the largest man-made woodland in England. The majority of the forest lies within The Border Forest Park with the southern tip, known as Wark Forest, lying within Northumberland National Park. The Bakethin North Shore walk is a 2 and a half mile circular route which takes in the Bakethin Reservoir and also includes Dead Man's Cairn, the route of the old Border Counties Railway and the Kielder Viaduct.
Skyscape - Kielder Forest Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.228961,-2.5884 Kielder Forest is a large forest in Northumberland, surrounding the reservoir Kielder Water. This walk is a 3 mile circular walk (there and back along the same path) which takes you up to the Skyscape, part of the Kielder Forest art and architecture programme. It was designed by internationally acclaimed American artist, James Turrell and is a sculptural artwork at the Cat Cairn viewpoint where Turrell manipulates our normal perceptions of light and space.
Torduff Reservoir Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.894807,-3.26971 A relatively easy 45 minute, two mile circular walk around Torduff Reservoir and Sanctuary Wood in the Pentland National park.
Three Reservoirs Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.893989,-3.262528 A six mile, two hour walk along tracks and paths around Torduff, Clubbiedean and Bonaly Reservoirs in the Pentland National Park. The route includes several climbs and descents plus a number of gates and one stone stile.
Battle and the Great Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.912918,0.494673 A 5 mile circular trail from the railway station of Battle in East Sussex. The town gets its name from the Battle of Hastings which was fought between Harold the Saxon King and William the Conqueror in 1066. The battle was so significant it changed the course of English history. The walk heads out from the station to pass through a long section of the Great Wood, a coniferous plantation managed by the Forestry Commission, before heading back into the centre of the town where you have the opportunity to explore some of the historic sites including the abbey which was built by William to mark the site of his victory. The walk has several long and steady climbs and descents throughout and the paths are a mixture of roadside pavements and mud field/forest paths, the latter of which can be both overgrown and muddy so long trousers and sturdy footwear are recommended. There are no stiles and just a couple of kissing gates. There are public toilets available at the station at the start of the walk. Entrance fees apply for entrance to the abbey. Approximate time 2 to 3 hours plus extra time if you wish to explore the abbey in full.
Burnham Beeches Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.556001,-0.624002 A two mile circular woodland walk through Burnham Beeches in Buckinghamshire. Burnham Beeches is 540 acres of ancient woodland which has been managed by the City of London Corporation since it purchased the site in 1880. Many of the trees are several hundred years old and the woodland is rich with wildlife. The walk follows a mixture of tarmac paths and woodland paths, the latter of which are quite uneven can be very muddy after rain and in the winter months. There are a few climbs and descents throughout plus a couple of gates, but there are no stiles. One area of the woodland that you pass through is grazed by cattle so take care with dogs here. There is a cafe and toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time one hour.
Wrottesley Park Round Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.619947,-2.214332 This is a wonderful circular walk suitable for a family with children, having a real countryside feel and marvellous views of the Wolverhampton city skyline. There is abundant wildlife and opportunities for small children to explore. Apart from the first few yards, the walk has no public roads and uses footpaths, bridleways and, for a short distance, the Staffordshire Way. Having said that, many of paths are accessible to vehicles on the estate, but the speed limit is highly restricted. Additionally, it is very unusual to see vehicles, other than farm vehicles at weekends. There are a few gates and stiles along the route and one section passes through a garden where a dog may be present. Some of the paths can be quite exposed and windy in winter months so be prepared. The route plotted is five miles long, but there are various points along the way where it can be shortened if walkers tire or the weather turns inclement.
Centenary Way (Warks) Day Two Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.546108,-1.53416 The second day of the Warwickshire Centenary Way (southbound) long distance path, starting at Hartshill Hayes country park and ending at Hawkesbury Junction on the Coventry Canal. A walk of variation, taking in rolling farmland, mining villages, and several miles of canal towpaths. There are a number of stiles and kissing gates to negotiate and there is livestock in many fields. A lengthy yet rewarding ramble through North Warwickshire, offering some quiet out-of-the way corners of the county contrasting with more urbanised sections.
The Wheatsheaf and Lower Woodford Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.114488,-1.822584 A 3.5 mile circular pub walk from The Wheatsheaf pub in Lower Woodford. A gently undulating walk through the picturesque Woodford valley and surrounding chalk downland. Good underfoot with lots of interesting countryside, views and wildlife to enjoy all year round. The walk follows a mixture of quiet lanes and woodland/field paths, the latter of which will be muddy after wet weather. There are a few gates and several stiles on route. Approximate time 70 to 90 minutes.
Codsall, Oaken and Codsall Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.629806,-2.202114 A circular, relatively flat walk through farmland and small woods using paths and bridleways with some short stretches along country lanes. Some of the footpaths can be particularly muddy so boots or wellies are essential. There are several stiles along the route and as much of the walk is through farmland, there are a lot of animals in the fields, particularly horses and cows. In one field walkers are warned that a bull is sometimes present as are cows and calves.
Codsall, Gunstone and Bilbrook Butterfly Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.633679,-2.198648 I've called this walk the Codsall, Gunstone and Bilbrook 'Butterfly' as it is a figure of eight route the outline of which looks very much like a butterfly. The circular nature of the walk means that it can be joined at any point and if followed completely will bring you back to the point at which you started. It is also suitable for those holidaying on the Shropshire Union Canal as it touches the canal. Additionally, it is easily cut short or completed in sections. The route uses paths and bridleways along which there are many stiles and kissing gates. Some of the horse paddocks have electric fencing which you will need to unhook (via the insulated handles) to pass through. There are also some short stretches along country lanes, but these are either very quiet or have broad verges along which to walk. There are a lot of animals on the route including horses, sheep and a few cows. There are several signs asking walkers to keep dogs on a leash. Most paths are well trodden and signposted, but can be boggy in parts and overgrown in other places.
Centenary Way (Warks) Day Three Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.45713,-1.46998 The third day of the Warwickshire Centenary Way (southbound), starting at Hawkesbury Junction on the Oxford Canal and ending at Coombe Abbey Country Park near Coventry. An easy paced walk offering several miles of gentle canal walking, attractive farmland, and quiet country lanes. There is a distinctly rural feel to this section but distant glimpses of the city of Coventry are never far away. There are a few stiles to negotiate once you leave the canal behind, and there are some fields containing livestock.
Usk Reservoir Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.944147,-3.698836 The Usk Reservoir is in a remote area surrounded by forest and moor-land overlooking Mynydd Du or the Black Mountain. This is a 6 mile circular trail which winds its way around the reservoir.
Daisy Nook and Park Bridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.501424,-2.121074 An easy walk around two country parks on the borders of Tameside and Oldham making use of old canal towpaths, woodland paths and lanes. Ideal for lovers of industrial archaeology the walk passes old mine workings and iron workshops which have now been turned into a wildlife haven.
Centenary Way (Warks) Day Seven Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.166119,-1.42467 Day Seven of the Warwickshire Centenary Way. This section of the walk offers elevated views from a series of hills and ridges, starting at the Burton Dasset Hills, traversing the line of Edge Hill, and onto Sunrising Hill. As well as lovely panoramas across Warwickshire the walk also visits a number of picturesque villages, culminating at Whatcote. The Cotswolds are within striking distance, and the architecture of the buildings begin to reflect this through extensive use of mellow golden limestone. There are large fields to traverse and these may be ploughed-over and muddy later in the year. There are also fields which may contain livestock. A number of stiles need to be negotiated.
Carn Goch Iron Age Hill Fort Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.900982,-3.917946 A particularly striking example and one of the largest iron age hill forts in Wales can be found in the west of the Carn Goch national park impressively located on a hilltop whose presence dominates the surrounding countryside. This walk travels through the hill fort with its massive stone defences and also offers excellent views of the surrounding hills.
Finchampstead Ridges and Blackwater Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.365451,-0.833594 A 4 mile circular walk from Simons Wood near Crowthorne in Berkshire. The walk heads south through the heath of Finchampstead Ridges and then through the Moor Green Lakes Nature Reserve to reach the River Blackwater. After following the river the walk turns back north to pass through paddocks and woodland to reach the start. The walk has a number of steady climbs and descents and includes a number of kissing gates but no stiles. The woodland and field paths can be very muddy after wet weather and there is also some road walking along quiet country lanes. The walk passes through a few paddocks which may be holding horses so take care with dogs here. There are no toilets or refreshments on route. Approximate time 2 hours.
From Chawton in the Footsteps of Jane Austen Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.132686,-0.988714 A 5 mile circular walk from the tiny Hampshire village of Chawton, within the South Downs National Park. The walk starts from the former home of author Jane Austen which now houses a museum. The route passes through woodland and farmland to reach the nearby village of Upper Farringdon before returning along a disused railway line. Along the way you'll see a few of the places that Jane enjoyed visiting when living in Chawton from 1809 to 1817. Aside from the literary connections, the Hampshire scenery is really beautiful, transporting you into peaceful traditional countryside and quaint villages teeming with thatched cottages. If you want refreshments before or after your walk then The Greyfriar pub is a great find and just a few yards along the road from the car park. The route has a few steady climbs and descents. There are a few kissing gates plus six stiles. Whilst most of the stiles are low with open fencing, making them easy for humans and dogs, the penultimate one is very tall and has wire fencing across so dogs (and some humans!) may need a hand over. The paths are mostly well made but the woodland and field paths can be muddy after periods of wet weather. One of the fields is likely to be holding sheep so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2 hours.
The Grove Arms, Ludwell and Charlton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.002616,-2.134353 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Grove Arms in Ludwell. A delightful and interesting walk through lanes, fields and villages of the Dorset/ Wiltshire borders. An all season walk rich in wildlife and one worth repeating. The walk has a few gentle climbs and descents and follows a mixture of lanes and woodland and field paths. There are several gates and stiles on route. Towards the end there is a stretch of narrow path that leads you up a steep bank which would be tricky for less able people. Approximate time 80 to 100 minutes.
The Foresters Arms and Kirdford Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.032482,-0.551389 A 3.6 mile circular pub walk from The Foresters Arms in Kirdford. A great mid-Sussex walk with a touch of everything. Great views, wooded tracks, open fields and an amble though the lovely village of Kirdford. The walks follows mainly woodland and field paths which will be muddy after wet weather, plus a short section of lanes. There are several kissing gates plus four stiles. Approximate time 80 to 100 minutes.
The Huntsman and Eridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.089753,0.202179 A 3 mile circular pub walk from The Huntsman in Eridge. An enjoyable, gently undulating walk through classic Kent countryside including converted oast house, wooded lanes, open fields and an abundance of bird life. The walk follows a mixture of quiet lanes and woodland and field paths. The route includes several kissing gates but there are no stiles. Approximate time 70 to 90 minutes.
Centenary Way (Warks) Day Four Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.41124,-1.40785 The fourth day of the Warwickshire Centenary Way (southbound), starting at Coombe Abbey and ending at the village of Stoneleigh, south of Coventry. An easy paced walk across farmland and pasture, winding through several small villages in the area and crossing the tiny rivers of the Avon and Sowe. A number of village churches and pubs are passed along the way. There are a number of stiles to negotiate, and fields may contain livestock.
Centenary Way (Warks) Day Five Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.3494,-1.51872 The fifth day of the Warwickshire Centenary Way (southbound), starting at the village of Stoneleigh and ending at Leamington Spa, visiting Kenilworth and Warwick en route. This section is an easy paced walk across farmland and pasture, with some additional urbantown walking. The historic castles at Kenilworth and Warwick are passed along the way and there are several shops and pubs along the route. There are a number of stiles to negotiate, and fields may contain livestock.
Hilton Figure of Eight Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.647021,-2.059505 This is relatively short walk using little trod footpaths for the most part through an area of land that can only be seen from the M6 between junctions 10a and 11. The walk is probably most easily accessed from Shareshill, although it is written starting from Hilton Lane near to the rear entrance to Hilton Park service station on the M6. There are a lot of stiles on the route and livestock that are not used to people, particularly horses. The horses can be a bit intimidating if you are not confident around large animals as some of the route takes you through fields where they graze and they are very inquisitive, so be warned. Part of the walk takes you through a well known car boot sale field and whilst there is a public right of way through it, the organisers do not encourage ramblers.
Lingmoor Fell Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.434544,-3.033519 A moderate to hard walk depending on the weather offering varied terrain and wideranging views over some of the most famous Lakeland Fells including the most spectacular view of the Langdale Pikes you will ever see (in my opinion).
Petworth and Shimmings Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.987816,-0.609454 A 3.5 mile figure of eight walk from the historic market town of Petworth in West Sussex. The walk gives an opportunity to explore the town, a haven for antique and art collectors, before heading out across the beautiful Shimmings Valley to reach the village of Byworth and returning to Petworth alongside the small meandering river. The views across the Shimmings Valley are stunning throughout the year. The walk has several steady but long gradients throughout and there are a couple of steeper short slopes that can be a little slippery after wet weather. There are several kissing gates throughout plus 6 stiles (a couple of the stiles are tall with mesh wire fencing across so dogs may need a lift over). Some of the fields are likely to be holding horses. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Silchester and Calleva Atrebatum Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.354582,-1.100159 A circular trail of a little more than 4 miles from the popular village of Silchester in Hampshire. The walk tours the site of Calleva Atrebatum, an ancient Roman settlement and amphitheatre, before looping through local farmland to return to the village. The walk includes a few gentle gradients and the paths are almost all across fields which can be muddy in winter and after wet weather. There are several kissing gates plus one stile on route and two short sections of road walking. Some of the fields are likely to be holding cattle so take particular care with dogs. Approximate time 2 hours.
Goatfell Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.5765987828,-5.1375026998 A long walk to the highest point on the Isle of Arran. At 2,866 feet the views are amazing over wide parts of southern Scotland and even out to the Isle of Man on clear days. Although the walk is not steep until the final ascent of the mountain itself it is unrelenting and hard work, but the views and scenery are well worth it.
The Black Bear and Wool Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.680235,-2.218608 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Black Bear in Wool. A satisfying mid Dorset walk with a bit of everything. Lanes, fields, streams, meadows, woods, views and wildlife, ending with an amble past charming cottages of old Wool. The walk follows a mixture of lanes/roads and paths across farmland. There are several gates on route plus six stiles. Approximate time 80 to 100 minutes.
A Riggindale Round Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.4898044989,-2.8188260231 A Strenuous walk round a remote Lake District valley with big views and the chance of seeing England's only native Golden Eagle. Although I have not graded this as the hardest 5 out of 5 rating it is rough and steep in some places and care should be taken. It is ideally best saved for a clear day as the views from High Street and High Raise are unsurpassed.
The Langdale Pikes Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.4484075107999,-3.09000914329999 I know you are not supposed to have favourites but this walk is mine. It is everything hill walking is about, a stiff climb, a bit of a scramble, great views, tarns, history and an iconic skyline. If you only ever climb one group of Lake District fells then it should be these. As reflected in the difficulty rating of 5 this is not a walk to be taken lightly despite the fact it is only 4 miles, the rock can be slippery after rain and you will need to use your hands to get up Pike O'Stickle.
Catbells to High Spy Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.5801106781,-3.1657784666 A Lake District Classic, Catbells with its distinctive profile appears in a multitude of postcards and photographs and is always prominently on the Keswick and Derwentwater skyline. This walk follows the line of the ridge that goes from Catbells across Maiden Moor to High Spy and then down through the woods near Grange and along the lane back to the start.
The Spotted Cow and Bourne Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.201176,-0.781321 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Spotted Cow in Lower Bourne, a wonderful rural pub with great ales and wines, a varied menu and which welcomes dogs and children. The walk heads out through narrow wooded lanes to reach Bourne Wood, before passing through the woodland to reach the Rural Life Centre and then returning through the heath, forest and quiet village lanes. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout and most of the paths are unmade so can be uneven and quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are no stiles and just a few gates. Some sections of the woodland and heath are grazed for conservation by rare breed cattle so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Skiddaw Plus Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.6188461216,-3.1157791566 At 3,054 feet Skiddaw is the fourth highest mountain in England and this walk takes in not only Skiddaw but two other fells as well. However, don't worry. You set off at nearly a third of the way up and this walk is well within most active people's capabilities.
A Wastwater Wander Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.4333140558,-3.3132322196 Wasdale boasts England's deepest lake, Wastwater and this walk not only goes all the way around it, but gives you a spectacular aerial view down on it. Ideally try to finish this walk around dusk, as on sunny days the setting sun turns the scree slope on the far side of the lake into a spectacular array of pinks and reds.
Great Gable via Moses Trod Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.5112586963999,-3.1986864194 Probably the easiest way to ascend this Lake District giant by following an ancient smugglers route. A bit of a scree slope and an easy scramble bring you to one of the most jaw dropping places in Lakeland and the chance to see four different valleys on one walk! The walk was so good Alfred Wainwright listed it as one of his favourites and if it was good enough for him then it should be OK for the rest of us.
Enville and the Sheepwalks Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.477842,-2.25749 Although there are many pretty walks in South Staffordshire this one offers the best views. Close by is Kinver Edge and the Lickey Hills and further away the Cotswalds, Malverns, Clees, Long Mynd, Styper Stones and the Wrekin can all be seen. Along the route are many stiles and several fields of livestock, particularly, as you would expect, sheep. There is about 140 metres of climb, but fairly steady and not too difficult for anyone of moderate fitness. There is short distance along a busy road, but it is the route of the Staffordshire Way, so ramblers are a common sight to locals. The Cat is famous for its own ales and is a pleasant place to end the journey. In the churchyard of St Mary's there are the remains of a Saxon cross.
Forde Abbey Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.826411,-2.887721 Forde Abbey is a circular walk of approximately 6 miles across meadows and fields and is reasonably easy terrain. It also includes the pretty Axe Valley with a chance to see nesting buzzards if lucky. The walk itself passes Forde Abbey which has tea rooms but which are only accessible if you pay the entrance fee of circa £10. The walk includes several stiles and kissing gates and also involves crossing a stream via stepping stones.
Golden Cap Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.722637,-2.822542 One of the nicest walks on the South Coast with good views of the bay towards Charmouth and to the east Chesil Beach. Two fairly stiff climbs but well worth it for the view on a good day. The walk starts at the car park in Seatown which is opposite the dog friendly Anchor Inn. The Inn has a good selection of ales and a decent menu. There are several stiles on the walk which make it impractical for pushchairs and cattle can be found in some fields so dogs must be kept under control. The ground is generally firm but can be boggy in some areas after heavy rain.
Centenary Way (Warks) Day Six Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.287201,-1.53437 The sixth day of the Warwickshire Centenary Way (southbound), starting at Royal Leamington Spa and ending at the Burton Dasset hills, visiting the villages of Ufton, Harbury and Northend. This section is an easy paced walk across farmland and pasture as well as a section of the Grand Union canal. Once busy Leamington is left behind the walk follows the quiet byways of south Warwickshire and delivers a reward at the end with superlative views from the top of the Burton Dasset hills. There are a number of stiles to negotiate, and fields may contain livestock.
Woodstock and Blenheim Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.848111,-1.352541 A 5 mile circular walk from the pretty Cotswold town of Woodstock. The walk takes in a stretch of Blenheim Park, the publically accessible grounds of Blenheim Palace, before returning across arable fields and water meadows. The beautiful landscaped grounds of the palace, designed by Capability Brown, provide an excellent contrast to the farmed landscape on the return leg. The walk has just gentle slopes and there are a few gates plus one stile (with adjacent dog gate). The surfaces in the park are all well made but the field paths on the return leg can be a little muddy after periods of rain. There are sheep grazing in Blenheim Park – dogs are welcome but must be kept on leads. There are public toilets in the car park at the start. Approximate time 2 hours.
Bobbington Round Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.511706,-2.285142 A reasonably level four mile walk through South Staffordshire farmland. NOTE: The paths on this walk can be very overgrown in the height of the summer growing season and this may lead to the early part of the route being impassible so the walk is best reserved for other times of the year. In many places the undergrowth is thick so long trousers are recommended, but several farmers have left very broad and well maintained headlands along field edges and these are towards the end of the walk so the hard going is near the start. There are quite a lot of stiles, some of which are a bit unstable, but this is a little trodden route, which makes it all the more of an adventure. There are both cows and sheep on the route, but usually in adjacent fields.
Minster Lovell and Crawley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.799056,-1.53928 A 4 mile circular walk from the pretty Oxfordshire village of Minster Lovell. The walk begins heading out along the street lined with thatched stone cottages, then crosses farmland and follows an ancient lane to reach the nearby village of Crawley. The return stretch runs alongside a stretch of the River Windrush and you will have chance to explore the ruins of Minster Lovell Hall. The walk has a few gently climbs and descents plus one fairly steep but short descent through woodland. The route follows a mixture of field paths, unmade tracks and riverside meadows all of which can get very muddy in the winter and after wet weather so good waterproof boots are a must. There are two stiles (one with adjacent dog gate, and one low stone stile) plus a few kissing gates. Some of the fields may be holding cattle so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours depending on the conditions underfoot.
Trescott Round Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.572362,-2.218348 A lovely walk through South Staffordshire farmland ustilising footpaths, farm tracks and bridleways with a short distance along a country lane. Part of the route uses the Staffordshire Way and another part follows the Monarch's Way. All of the footpaths are well marked and there are a lot of good quality steel 'kissing' gates and a few stiles. Much of the route follows long paths with little chance of mistakes. The walk offers views of Perton ridge, Castlecroft and some of the higher parts of the south westerly side of Wolverhampton. To the west the Clee Hills can be seen.
Seisdon and Trysull Round Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.550797,-2.239424 This is one of the nicest walks that I know of in South Staffordshire visiting two of its prettiest villages. The walk uses long, easy to follow footpaths, bridleways and farm tracks with two very short stretches along roads. There are several stiles and gates along the route and a few fields have horses, but most of the fields are arable and there is generally little livestock to worry about. The route crosses Smestow Brook in several places and there are good views across the South Staffordshire and Shropshire countryside and across to Wolverhampton, Sedgley and Dudley and Kinver Edge too.
Blymhill and Marston Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.708209,-2.285298 This six mile walk is a bit of a Jekyll and Hyde route; glorious in the summer and a mud-fest in the autumn and winter, taking you to very remote fields and footpaths. The route is very flat, but there are a plethora of stiles and gates. As the route is remote it is easy not to see anybody at all and with only a couple of hundred metres on roads at the beginning of the walk it is very safe indeed, although there is some livestock. Something to eat and drink is necessary as there are no shops or pubs on the route at all.
Avebury's World Heritage Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.425595,-1.857905 A six mile circular loop from the pre-historically important village of Avebury in Wiltshire. The area is heavily populated with prehistoric sites which appear on the World Heritage List and you will be able to see many of these up close and also have chance to explore a couple – the Avebury Stone Circles and the West Kennet Long Barrow. The walk has several steady but long climbs and descents and the paths, whilst good for most of the year, can be quite muddy after wet weather and in winter. There are several gates plus five stiles (all with open fencing making them easy for most dogs) and some of the fields are likely to be holding sheep and/or cattle. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Tetney Lock Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.498178,0.022351 An easy four mile walk in North East Lincolnshire. The walk starts at Tetney Lock and includes a quiet country lane leading to the Humber Estuary where you will overlook the RSBP reserve with a good chance of seeing a wide selection of birds such as oyster catchers, little turn, redshank, ringed plover and many other water fowl. The Humber estuary also includes the two forts which were built during WW 1 but only saw action in WW2 when they helped defend the entrance with submarine nets. The forts were machine gunned several times by German mine laying aircraft. The lock at Tetney no longer actually exists, but once provided navigation from the North Sea to Louth.
The White Horse Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.646723,-2.390607 A delightful circular walk of 4 miles visiting the picturesque village of Sutton Poyntz and the famous Osmington White Horse with King George as its rider. The walk involves one quite steep climb which is rewarded with good views over to the Weymouth coast. There are several stiles and gates and some lower stretches can be muddy in wet weather. There are cows and horses along the route within the low pastures.
The Fairfield Horseshoe Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.433753755,-2.9642449006 The Fairfield Horseshoe is quite rightly an absolute Lakeland Classic. It's long, it's high, it's 8 seperate Wainwright Fells all in one walk and it even goes through the grounds of William Wordsworth's house - it doesn't get any more Lake District than this. Nowhere on the walk is navigation a problem (so long as it's not foggy) and chances are that you will be constantly bumping into other walkers - as I said, this is a classic, however, it's not easy and a full day's walk. There is also a bit of a climb down at one section just after Low Pike that you need to be aware of.
Anglesey Coast Path Day 1 Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.3116765943,-4.6325987621 Anglesey is a walker's paradise and this is day one of the 125 mile coast path that circumnavigates the whole island. This route starts at the church of St Cybi's in the port town of Holyhead and finishes at the lovely little beach at Treaddur Bay, taking in South Stack lighthouse and Holyhead mountain on the way.
Coniston Old Man Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.3688291343999,-3.0798584627 Coniston Old Man is probably one of the most climbed mountains in the Lake District and this walk follows the popular tourist route to the top. However, the way down is a bit more secluded passing one of the most spectacular cliffs in the area and a superb hidden valley.
Causey Pike Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.584313596,-3.1889153484 This is another one of those walks that is fairly easy but for one small section - and what a section it is. A steep climb, a bit of a scramble to the top, a ridge walk and an old quarryman's path - just another typical day in the Lake District.
South Walsham Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.675986,1.508001 A level circular walk from Fleet Dyke Moorings, South Walsham. If you are travelling by boat this walk can be started from the Moorings or if you are coming by car a car park can be found on the route. Half the route follows a new flood defence bank on the river, the remainder follows a farm track back to the village. The St Benet's Abbey monastery ruins can be seen across the river on this walk as well as an abundance of wildlife. Marsh harriers are frequently seen on this walk so allow plenty of time if you enjoy bird watching. Barn Owls are common in the evening.
Swinley Forest from Blanes Lane Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.395003,-0.705637 A 3.5 mile circular woodland walk through a pretty section of Swinley Forest in Berkshire. The walk starts from the timber yard and firewood department in the forest, before heading out on wide forest tracks through sections of pine, beech and oaks giving stunning scenery throughout the year. There is plenty of wildlife to see including squirrels, woodpeckers and deer and the area is very popular with dog walkers so a great place to go for a doggy play date! The walk follows mainly well-made stone or tarmac forest tracks plus a few short sections of grass tracks which can be quite muddy in winter and after wet weather. There are no gates or stiles and the route includes several steady climbs and descents throughout. There are no toilet or refreshment facilities within this section of the forest. Approximate time 70 to 90 minutes.
Salhouse Broad Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.6886,1.4313 A de-tour level circular to the village shop from Salhouse Broad. Half country road walking with half across fields back to village road. The walk starts from the moorings for those travelling by boat, but if you are arriving by car you can adjust the walk to start and finish at the car park at waypoint one.
Belchford and Fulletby Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.260582,-0.063884 A circular walk of 4 miles around the two villages of Belchford and Fulletby which includes stretches of the Viking Way, across the Lincolnshire Wolds. The walk crosses meadows and wolds and includes some mild climbs which on a clear day can provide distant views of Lincoln Cathedral. The Blue Bell Inn at Belchford provides a good start point and refreshments at the end of the walk whilst Fulletby has several interesting buildings and a notable history. There are several kissing gates and a couple of stiles to negotiate as well as some muddy areas after wet weather.
Coltishall and Belaugh Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.728125,1.370811 A circular level walk through countryside, alongside the miniature Bure Valley Railway where if you are lucky a steam train will pass, plus field tracks and riverside paths. The walk starts from the river moorings if you are travelling by boat, but there is also parking in the road alongside for those arriving by car.
Ampthill and Maulden Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.041478,-0.488447 A 5.5 mile circular walk through the gently rolling landscape of the Bedfordshire hills, providing superb views of the countryside throughout. The walk starts from the ruins of Houghton House, said to be the inspiration for House Beautiful in John Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress. The walk has several steady but long climbs and descents throughout and there is one stile (with an open fencing surround) and several kissing gates. The paths are a mixture of tarmac/concrete lanes and field edge paths the latter of which can get quite muddy after wet weather so waterproof boots are recommended. Whilst most of the farm land is arable, some of the fields may be holding cattle so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
How Hill to Ludham Bridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.717719,1.507704 A pleasant circular walk along field paths and river banks, taking in the Ludham marshes, where if you are very lucky a Bittern may be seen. Wildlife is very prolific here and along the route you may see marsh harriers, sparrow hawks, wetland birds or even an otter. The path section from Ludham Bridge to Toad Hole Cottage is on a new flood bank to protect the new marshes built about 2005 to encourage rare wildlife. The walk is written for those arriving by boat, starting from the nearest moorings, but there are also two car parks available on route for those arriving by car.
Potter Heigham Bridge circular walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.710082,1.580784 Start point Potter Heigham Bridge. A circular walk along the bank of the River Thurne to the inland edge of Hickling Broad, back down a farm road (note: this can be churned up after heavy rain) back to Potter Heigham Bridge. This walk can be extended at waypoint 1 to follow the flood bank and back through Potter Heigham Village.
Horning Bewilderwood Round Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.704451,1.46607 A pleasant round walk from Horning to Bewilderwood field, going round the office onto the cycle path to back lane, then following the road to a path back to the village.
Leith Hill Place and Tower Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.173714,-0.371839 A 2.5 mile circular woodland walk through the Surrey Hills and taking you to the highest point in south east England – Leith Hill. The walk also passes through the former grounds of Leith Hill Place, a country house dating back to 1600 with its Rhododendron Woods, planted woodland and walled ruins. Note: If you wish to climb the tower to make the most of the views, entrance fees and restricted opening times apply so check the National Trust website in advance. The walk has a number of climbs and descents throughout, some of which are long and fairly steep. There are no stiles and just a few kissing gates but the final section of the walk follows a long flight of uneven steps cut into the woodland as you descend back to the car park. The paths are all unmade and whilst firm for most of the year, they can be quite muddy in winter and after long periods of rain. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Toad Hole Moorings to Ludham Bridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.7136,1.5074 A different walk to the How Hill walk (also available on iFootpath) but starting at the same point and returning on the same path. This is a pleasant circular walk along field paths and river banks, taking in the Ludham marshes, where if you are very lucky a Bittern may be seen. Wildlife is very prolific here and along the route you may see marsh harriers, sparrow hawks, wetland birds or even an otter. The path section from Ludham Bridge to Toad Hole Cottage is on a new flood bank to protect the new marshes built about 2005 to encourage rare wildlife.
Trent Park Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.657126,-0.150165 A 3 mile circular walk through Trent Country Park, part of the Metropolitan Green Belt in the London Borough of Enfield. A wonderful mix of wild woodland and landscaped parkland, the walk transports you back in time. A popular venue with local residents, there is plenty of opportunity for both children and dogs to make new friends! The park is open during daylight hours. The walk follows a mix of tarmac paths/avenues and woodland paths, the latter of which can be uneven underfoot and can get quite muddy in winter and after wet weather. There are no stiles and just a few kissing gates on route. There are a few gentle climbs and descents throughout. The park has a cafe and toilets located alongside the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Richmond Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.443915,-0.293375 A 5 mile circular trail on the paths of Richmond Park. Richmond Park is a large bustling park where fallow deer, red deer and a whole host of wildlife share the area with joggers, cyclists and walkers. One of London's Royal Parks, the park dates back to the early 1600s and is popular with residents and visitors alike. Most of the walk follows tarmac paths put about a quarter of it follows grass paths which can get muddy in winter and after rain. There are only a few steady climbs and descents. The paths can be quite busy and you are likely to be sharing them with plenty of joggers and cyclists. Dogs are welcome in Richmond Park but remember there are free roaming deer so you need to keep them under close control (you don't want to create your own YouTube ‘Fenton!' moment). The deer can become aggressive towards dogs during the breeding season (Sep/Oct) and the birthing season (May to July). There is a park information centre, refreshment kiosk and public toilets alongside the car park at the start. Approximate time 2 hours.
Whitmoor Common and Jordan Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.267584,-0.594097 A 4 mile circular trail around the nature reserves of Whitmoor Common and Jordan Hill in Surrey. The area comprises beautiful expanses of heathland, woodland, grassland, ponds and streams. The heathland is home to a range of animals, birds and insects giving a rare habitat for night jars, dragonflies and water voles to thrive. The common is very popular with dog walkers and makes a great place to meet up with friends, but the expanse of area means that those preferring their own company can also enjoy a peaceful walk. The walk follows heath and woodland paths, some of which can get quite muddy in the winter and after wet weather so good waterproof boots are recommended at these times. There are a few steady climbs and descents and no stiles or gates. The common is used to graze rare breed cattle during the summer months so take care with children and dogs around the electric fences. Approximate time 2 hours.
Epsom Downs and Walton on the Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.311732,-0.244875 A 5.5 mile circular walk through Epsom and Walton Downs, the chalk downlands which form part of the North Downs in Surrey. The route starts from Epsom Downs Racecourse, home to The Derby, and heads south through Walton Downs to reach the pretty village of Walton on the Hill. Here, about half way round, there are a couple of pubs and a cafe, the perfect place for lunch and/or a pint. The walk returns back through woodland bridleways and open downland paths. There are great views throughout and on a clear day much of London and Surrey is visible. The walk has a few steady climbs and descents throughout and, whilst most of the paths are well made, some of the chalk bridleways can become muddy/slippery after wet weather. There are no stiles and just one single gate. The racecourse is open throughout the year but there are restrictions on race days so it is best to avoid these times. Dogs are welcome as long as they are under control and on leads while horses are being trained (follow the guidance on the signs within the course). Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Ewelme chilterns Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.615549,-1.065325 This is a circular walk from the pretty village of Ewelme venturing into the Chilterns countryside. The walk follows footpaths and bridleways, some of which can get quite muddy in the winter and after wet weather so good waterproof boots are recommended at these times. There are a few steady climbs and descents with no stiles or gates. Please note that at the start of the walk you will pass fields containing pigs. Take care with children and dogs around the electric fences.
Bickerton Hills and Sandstone Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.085457,-2.712451 A 3 mile circular walk taking in the Bickerton Hills which form part of the Sandstone Trail in Cheshire. A really popular route with walkers, the trail is fairly strenuous but you will be rewarded throughout with stunning views of the surrounding valleys. On clear days it is possible to see as far as the Liver Building and Ellesmere Port. The route has many climbs and descents, some of which are fairly steep. There are 4 stiles (which are tall and do have wire fencing around so dogs may need a lift over), a few kissing gates and several flights of steps set into the woodland and sandstone trail. The paths can get quite muddy after periods of wet weather and the paths are very uneven with rocks and tree roots, so sturdy waterproof boots are recommended. Whilst the route is just over 3 miles in length, the undulating nature of the terrain adds further distance so allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
Coed Llandegla Forest Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.062798,-3.135509 A 7 mile circular woodland walk through the coniferous plantation of Coed Llandegla Forest in Denbighshire. The walk is fairly strenuous but worthwhile to access some of the most peaceful woodland in the country – if you visit outside peak times stop halfway round, stand still and listen and you will hear absolutely nothing! Where the views open up they are really breathtaking and on clear days it is possible to see the peak of Snowdon. The route climbs to the top of the spruce plantations and continues all the way to the west of the forest perhaps giving you chance to see some of the forest's rarer residents – the black grouse and the nightjar. The route follows mostly well made stone tracks and paths with just one section following an unmade section of ground, which can be a little muddy. There are many climbs and descents throughout some of which are very long and others of which are very steep so good sturdy footwear is recommended. There are a couple of kissing gates but otherwise the paths are open. Dogs are welcome but must be under control to keep them away from the mountain bike trails that also run through the forest. There is a cafe and toilets at the visitor centre at the start of the walk. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Frodsham and Sandstone Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.28407,-2.723024 A 5 mile circular trail from the Cheshire market town of Frodsham, taking in the first section of the Sandstone Trail, a long-distance-path, before returning through hills, lanes and farmland. Near the start of the walk you'll be able to enjoy great views (on clear days!) over the Mersey estuary and then the Sandstone Trail gives an opportunity to enjoy the geology of the area with large exposed sections of red sandstone. The walk follows woodland and farm paths which can be quite muddy after wet weather and in winter. The paths are also quite uneven with rocks and tree roots so good waterproof and sturdy boots are recommended. There are several steep climbs and descents throughout plus a number of kissing gates and flights of steps but no stiles. A couple of short sections of the walk are through fields which may be holding cattle so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Beeston and Peckforton Castles Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.126906,-2.688207 A 4 mile circular trail taking in two beautiful castles set within the sandstone hills of Cheshire. The walk starts from Beeston Castle, the ruins of a 13th Century castle which is managed by English Heritage and sits high upon a sandstone crag. The route heads out across farmland to circle Peckforton Castle, a 19th Century country house built in the style of a medieval castle and now operating as a hotel. The journey takes you along one section of the Sandstone Trail, a famous long-distance-path, and along the quiet woodland paths through the Peckforton Estate. Both castles are visible for much of the route sitting high on their respective hills giving a real sense of their imposing presence on the area. The walk has a few climbs and descents most of which are fairly gentle, but there is one set of fairly steep and deep-treaded woodland steps which are a bit of a challenge to negotiate. There are several kissing gates and 3 stiles (but these are all quite low and open making them fairly easy for both humans and dogs!). The paths are a combination of stone and woodland/field paths which can be quite muddy after wet weather. Some of the fields may be holding cattle. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Nantwich River and Canal Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.06715,-2.525879 A 3 mile circular waymarked walk from the market town of Nantwich in Cheshire. The walk heads out through the Riverside Park on the paths following the River Weaver before crossing farmland to join the towpath of the Shropshire Union Canal for the return leg. The route is almost entirely flat with just a couple of gentle short gradients. There are several gates throughout plus a couple of sets of steps but no stiles. You will need to cross the railway at a crossing without signals so take particular care here. The riverside and canal-side paths are all well-made with stone and tarmac, but the section across fields in the middle of the walk can get very muddy in winter and after wet weather. The fields are likely to be holding horses, cattle and sheep so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Chester City Walls Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.190848,-2.888542 A 2 mile circular stroll around the city walls of Chester in Cheshire. The Grade I listed walls are the best preserved city walls in Britain and encircle the site of the medieval city. A footpath runs along the top of the walls and they are complete except for one small section of about 100 metres. On route you'll have chance to see Chester's many attractions including the castle, cathedral and racecourse. The walk follows the paved path on top of the walls. There are no gates but several steps (although if you are willing to carry a pushchair up and down the steps, it is possible to negotiate the route with a pushchair). Approximate time 1 hour.
Bridgwater River and Canal Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.127922,-3.002115 A 5 mile circular walk from the town of Bridgwater in Somerset. The walk heads south out of the town along the banks of the River Parrett before returning along the towpath of the Bridgwater and Taunton Canal. Of course the area is fairly industrial and so it isn't the prettiest of walks, but if you're in Bridgwater and want somewhere to stride out and stretch your legs then this will certainly do the job. The route will also give you chance to reflect on the history of travel in Britain, with the river, canal, railway and M5 motorway all criss-crossing the journey. The walk follows a mixture of town pavements, stone paths and grass field/tow paths the latter of which can be quite muddy in winter and after wet weather. The route is almost entirely flat and there are four gates plus a number of steps over the river bridge. One section of the towpath is quite narrow so take care with children and dogs here. Approximate time 2 hours.
Eckington and River Avon Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.078572,-2.114955 A 3.5 mile circular trail from the pretty Worcestershire village of Eckington, following a couple of miles of the River Avon before returning through the village streets. This stretch of the river is teaming with activity – with plenty of boats in the summer months and a wide array of wildlife throughout the year. The walk is almost entirely flat but, remember, this section of the River Avon is well-known for its tendency to flood so after heavy or prolonged periods of rain check the river level with the Environment Agency before setting out. The riverside paths are all unmade grass paths which can get quite muddy in winter and/or after rain. There are no stiles but several kissing gates and two flights of steps on route. Some sections of the field paths are enclosed with electric fences so take care with children and dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Simons wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.365405,-0.833517 This is a short woodland walk following some of the more established paths around the lake and through the woods. There are however other sections not covered by this walk where you can ramble into the substantial woods. The area is loved by dog walkers and families alike as it has some great areas for hide and seek. This walk is not suitable for pushchairs or wheelchairs and in the wet weather can get very boggy.
Yateley Common Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.328577,-0.83287 A short walk around Yateley Common, mostly off road and away from traffic. Watch for wildlife there is all sorts around if you look for it. No gates or stiles on this walk but there are a couple of pinch points. It's a common so the tracks are prone to weather, can be muddy and wet, but most of it is good walking with no steep hills to go up and down.
Tyrebagger wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 57.1907,-2.246919 A 2 mile circular forest walk
Wendover Arm Circular Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.783274,-0.735086 This circular walk offers a chance to explore a wildlife corridor made possible by the efforts of a local canal restoration society determined to preserve the track of a waterway that hasn't seen boat traffic for over a hundred years. At the same time, it offers a contrast with modern society, cutting across land belonging to an RAF training base, marked with a fighter plane at its entrance
East Ilsley and the Ridgeway Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.526588,-1.289683 A 3 mile circular walk from the small Berkshire village of East Ilsley following wide farm tracks across the surrounding downland including one section of The Ridgeway, Britain's oldest road. There are beautiful views throughout taking in the gentle rolling hills that surround this area. The walk is very easy to navigate with only a handful of turns, and all the paths are wide tracks making it fairly easy walking. The tracks are mainly a mix of stone/dirt and so can get quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are no stiles or gates and all the slopes are very gentle. The tracks are all fenced from the adjacent fields so you won't come into contact with any livestock. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
The Ver and Verulamium Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.754313,-0.352405 This short circular route offers a mix of footpath and park walking, offers magnificent views of the city's cathedral, as well as a chance to get up close and personal with some of the old Roman Wall that used to surround the city. These days the River Ver is a modest waterway, but it was once significant enough to encourage the Romans to settle here and to name their city after it. Following it on this walk allows you to explore a lesser known part of the city, as well as the opportunity to spot wildlife on Verulamium Lake.
Along the Thames:Abingdon to Oxford Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.668097,-1.278856 This walk follows a stretch of the Thames Path National Trail, linking the historical town of Abingdon with its more famous (some might say infamous) neighbour of Oxford. The equally notorious Thames provides a guide throughout the walk, so it's difficult to get lost, although there's a small wooded section at the start and occasional side channels of the river which mean that getting lost isn't an impossibility, so you need to follow the directions and watch out for the frequent Thames Path waymarkers. The walk itself is just under ten miles
Clumber Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.264471,-1.063859 A 5 mile circular trail around Clumber Park, a large estate managed by the National Trust in Nottinghamshire. The route will give you chance to see many of the park's key features including Clumber Lake, Clumber Bridge, Clumber Chapel (often referred to as the Cathedral in Miniature') and a section of Limetree Avenue (the longest double-lined avenue of lime trees in Europe). The route is fairly flat with no stiles or gates.
The Thatched Tavern and South West Coast Path Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.506593,-3.515787 A 2 mile circular pub walk from The Thatched Tavern in Maidencombe. A lovely and undulating walk from the delightful village of Maidencombe along the South West Coast Path. Lots of variety including wooded paths, open fields and country lanes. The walk follows a mixture of woodland/coastal paths and quiet lanes, the former of which are uneven with tree roots and will be muddy after wet weather. The section along the South West Coast Path has several climbs and descents including some steep slopes with flights of steps. There is one kissing gate on route, but no stiles. Approximate time 60 to 80 minutes.
Fleet Pond Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.28981,-0.832046 A 2 mile walk around Fleet Pond, a made up path has been laid round the pond that is quite pushchair friendly, but it can be muddy in places and in May 2013 it is still having some of the spoil moved round and being spread that has been dredged from the pond. This walk is great on a hot day as the tree shade is most of the way round with plenty of viewing points and pond dipping for the kids. This is quite a busy walk.
Yateley, Castle Bottom Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.328634,-0.833004 A walk around a Nature Reserve that most people in Yateley do not know about, part of the way is around Blackbushe airfield (ex RAF Hartford Bridge), no stiles and only 2 kissing gates, a short steep decline and several hillocks to walk over, as it is a nature reserve it can be muddy and wet, with a decked walkway over some of the route as well, I have noted the worst part on the walk instructions, plenty of wildlife to spot if you're lucky. Cattle are grazed in the summer here, Nightjars, Dartford Warblers and Woodlarks nest here in season as well.
North Esk Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.788946,-3.339255 An excellent 5 mile circuit walk beginning in a secluded glen along the North Esk River and opening out past the North Esk Reservoir and over Patie's Hill. This walk can be particularly muddy especially where it follows the river.
Sherwood Forest Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.202697,-1.063561 A 4 mile circular trail through the heart of Sherwood Forest, the legendary home of Robin Hood. The walk will give you chance to see the Major Oak, the forest's most famous landmark, as well as many of the other ancient majestic oak trees which populate the area. Throughout the walk you will see bird feeding stations, making woodland birds such as nuthatches and woodpeckers a common sight. The walk is relatively flat with just steady slopes in a couple of places. There are no stiles and just a handful of single gates. The surfaces are a mixture of stone and dirt forest tracks, some of which can be muddy after wet weather and all of which can be a little uneven with tree roots in parts. The route would be suitable for rugged pushchairs. There are toilet facilities and a cafe at the start of the walk. Dogs are welcome in the forest and can also be taken on a lead into parts of the visitor centre. Parts of the forest are grazed by cattle and sheep during the summer so take care with dogs at these times. Approximate time 2 hours.
Red Kites and Ridgeway Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.672529,-0.847774 This varied stroll through archetypal Chilterns countryside provides a number of opportunities to spot red kites, reintroduced into the area in 1989, with the first successful breeding taking place three years later. They are now commonplace in this area and you are virtually guaranteed to see them on this walk - don't forget your camera and binoculars. Look out for the wide (four foot) wingspan and forked tail, with chestnut red and white markings. A stretch of the Ridgeway National Trail is also included, as well as some excellent views over the Vale of Aylesbury. This is a fairly strenuous walk largely due to two steep hills, although both are scaled reasonably quickly and the views make the effort worthwhile. The walk is circular and should take around two hours to complete. There's a shop in Bledlow Ridge and a pub, although the latter is not open on Mondays. The track is mainly footpath, although there are some roads and pavements scattered around.
Along the Thames: Hammersmith Bridge to Richmond Bridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.487703,-0.23096 This pleasant stroll along London's river takes you from the outer edge of the western part of the city into the beginnings of suburbia, although hugging the edge of the water means you may not notice until you get there
Ridgeway Ramble: Wendover to Princes Risborough Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.762113,-0.742779 Pick a clear day for this walk, as there's some great views to be had early on from the Coombe Hill War Memorial, both across the counties and, more immediately, down to Chequers, the PM's weekend country retreat, a closer view of which follows later on in the walk.
The Upton Inn and Upton Cheyney Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.426668,-2.444381 A 3 mile circular pub walk from The Upton Inn in Upton Cheyney, near Bitton in Somerset. An interesting, undulating walk from the delightful village of Upton Cheyney across the hills above Bath and Bristol. Good views and variety of wildlife to enjoy.
Ye Olde George Inn and East Meon Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.994706,-1.032307 A 4 mile circular pub walk from Ye Olde George Inn in East Meon. A delightful, scenic and undulating mid Sussex walk with great views to the South Downs. Open downland, wooded paths, quiet lanes and the chance of seeing red kites. The paths are a mixture of field edge paths and stone tracks, some of which can get very muddy after wet weather. There are several slopes throughout and you will need to negotiate 5 kissing gates and 2 stiles. Approximate time 80-100 minutes.
Wandering West Wycombe's Woods Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.645499,-0.807141 West Wycombe hangs onto the edge of Buckinghamshire, and there's a moment early on in this walk when you may feel like you're hanging onto the edge of a precipice yourself. That moment happens just after you've climbed the steep hill up to the Dashwood Mausoleum that overlooks the village and the surrounding area.
The Foresters Arms and Fairwarps Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.019887,0.091699 A 2 mile circular pub walk from The Foresters Arms in Fairwarp. A lovely walk across the picturesque Ashdown Forest. Classic heathland paths, wooded tracks and peaceful lanes combine to produce an undulating, enjoyable ramble with great views. The walk has several slopes throughout and follows a mixture of stone tracks and woodland paths, some of which can be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles. Approximate time 70-90 minutes.
The Cock Inn and Chess Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.675063,-0.498312 A 3.5 mile circular pub walk from The Cock Inn in Sarratt. A delightful walk through the Chess Valley. Enjoy the rolling hills, riverside paths, open meadows and woodland tracks. A pleasure at any time of year. The route follows a mixture of field, woodland and riverside paths some of which can be quite soft underfoot after wet weather. There are a few gentle slopes within the route along with several kissing gates and two stiles. Approximate time 70-90 minutes.
The Misbourne Valley and Old Amersham Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.66661,-0.613196 The Misbourne is a modern success story and a testament to the efforts of campaigners to rescue it. A natural chalk stream, water companies were attracted to its exceptionally pure water and by the 1990s it was one of the worst affected rivers in the country for abstraction. A new pipeline was built from more sustainable sources and the river was rescued, and this circular walk gives you the opportunity to enjoy a stretch of it, as well as the delights of Old Amersham. It begins in the town, but soon heads up the side of the valley cut by the river to afford great views, although there is a climb involved first to earn them. The river itself is your companion for much of the second half of the walk, and includes a delightful stopping point by a ford, great for picnics or a paddle. At the walk's end there's the opportunity to take in a monument to seven Protestant martyrs burned at the stake in the 16th century, as well as the opportunity to sample part of Old Amersham. Here you can see the King's Arms, which featured as The Lucky Boatman in the film 'Four Weddings and a Funeral', as well as a number of historical buildings. Allow a couple of hours for this five and half mile walk.
North Cadbury and Woolston Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.048535,-2.521592 A 3 mile walk around the lanes and fields of North Cadbury, a lovely little village in South Somerset. Ideal for dog walking, although you may come across farm animals in some of the fields. The walk is relatively flat, there are several gates and stiles and the route can be very muddy after wet weather.
Along The Thames: Goring to Shillingford Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.522032,-1.141039 This walk starts at a significant point in the course of the River Thames, the Goring Gap, dividing the Chilterns to the north and the Berkshire Downs to the south. As if to mark this, there's a magnificent lock at the start, which can be viewed from above using the bridge across the river. From there, the walk heads towards the town of Wallingford via a short diversion away from the river, after which you cross over the water at a weir with white water hurtling beneath your feet. The route ends at Shillingford, with its impressive bridge, at a hotel, where you can take tea to celebrate your achievement, or something stronger if required! This is a linear walk covering around ten miles, with places to park a car at either end. Allow the best part of a day to complete, especially if you are shuffling cars. Apart from the single detour, which is largely on pavement, the walk follows the course of the river and the Thames Path National Trail, and as such is easy to follow and is relatively easy. There are a couple of watering holes along the way, but a picnic or Thermos might be a good idea.
The Silver Plough and Pitton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.079947,-1.698128 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Silver Plough in Pitton. A scenic, undulating walk through chalk downland around the pretty village of Pitton. Some lovely, far reaching views and lots of natural beauty to enjoy all year round. The walk has several slopes throughout and follows a mixture of field, woodland and downland tracks and paths. There are several gates and four stiles to negotiate on route (all the stiles have fence gaps suitable for medium-large dogs to pass through). Approximate time 90 minutes.
The Ginger Fox and Sturminster Marshall Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.79811,-2.084554 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Ginger Fox in Sturminster Marshall. A mainly level walk through undulating countryside and along the Stour Valley Way. Good views and birdlife make this a very pleasant ramble. Approximate time 60 to 80 minutes.
The True Lovers Knot and Tarrant Keyneston Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.841151,-2.097461 A 3.5 mile circular pub walk from The True Lovers Knot in Tarrant Keyneston. A lovely undulating walk through the Tarrant valley over open fields and grassy paths, skirting Ashley Wood and its famous golf club. Delightful views and pretty good under foot, a great country walk. The walk has several slopes plus a number of gates and stiles. The route follows a mixture of field paths and grass tracks some of which can be muddy after wet weather. Approximate time 70 to 90 minutes.
Along the Thames: Shillingford to Abingdon Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.623609,-1.14025 This straightforward, if fairly lengthy, walk criss-crosses the River Thames as it meanders its way through the Oxfordshire countryside. It is marked out by four bridges, Shillingford at the start and Abingdon at the end, with those at Clifton Hampden and Culham in between. There's meadows, fieldside walking and brushes with local villages, as well as a number of locks, where lock-keepers sometimes offer ice cream or other refreshment during the summer. Even if they are not when you are there, these locks are often highly picturesque and offer good 'pause points' to sit and watch the river traffic go by. The walk is linear, although it ends in Abingdon where you can either park a second car or get a taxi back to the start point. Public transport options aren't great. This is an all day walk, there's no point in hurrying it, taking around 4-5 hours to complete without stops (which you will need).
The Inn at Cranborne and Jubilee Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.918697,-1.92242 A 3.5 mile circular pub walk from The Inn at Cranborne in Dorset. An undulating and rewarding walk across the ancient chalk downland of North Dorset. Good under foot with expansive views and an abundance of birdlife. There are several slopes within the route but the walk is easy to navigate, follows well-made tracks and there are no stiles and just one gate. Approximate time 70 to 90 minutes.
The Harbour Inn and Axmouth Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.714463,-3.054446 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Harbour Inn in Axmouth. An undulating and rewarding walk through the lanes, fields and tracks of South Devon. Good exercise, excellent views and lots of birdlife to enjoy. There are several slopes throughout plus several gates and three stiles. You will need to cross one section of a golf course so take particular care here to allow players to pass and look out for any stray flying golf balls. Approximate time 80 to 100 minutes.
Iver and the Slough Arm Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.520145,-0.503576 Iver is a small village dating back to the Domesday Book and is built on a slight incline sloping down to the River Colne. These days it is overshadowed by the M25, but it is worth a detour to do this walk and to experience its theme of water. This comes in various guises, from brook to river, from lakes to canals - and sometimes more than one of them at once! The walk is circular and relatively easy, and you should allow more than 90 minutes, but probably less than two hours, to complete it; longer if you want to pause to contemplate some of the birdlife along the way. In total it's a little over four miles, but much of it is on well made up path and towpath.
Denham and The Colne Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.567118,-0.489614 Denham represents perhaps the last outpost of Shire England to the west of London before the capital's sprawl takes over. Appropriately, this circular walk describes a ring around the intersection of the M40 with the M25, but don't let that put you off, as the route provides an excellent way to enjoy a protected area, with remnants of market gardens and nurseries providing a reminder of how the villages around here once supplied fresh fruit and flowers to the capital. Its waterways also provided a means for city dwellers to reconnect with nature, and the walk links with both the River Colne and the Grand Union Canal in its early stages. At little over 5 miles in total, allow a good two hours to complete the walk. There's a useful Visitors Centre at the start providing refreshments as well as a canalside pub about a third of the way in. Although the path is good most of the way, some sections of fields can get muddy, so boots are recommended, and there are a number of stiles in the latter part of the walk.
Box Hill and Mickleham Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.248504,-0.312678 A 4.5 mile circular and fairly strenuous walk from Box Hill in the Mole Valley district of Surrey. Box Hill is well known for its box trees, its plethora of butterflies and also as the central feature of the cycling road races for the 2012 Olympics. The route heads along a short section of the North Downs Way before turning north descending steadily through Juniper Bottom. The walk then climbs again into Juniperhill Woods, heads down into the village of Mickleham and then back up the west side of Box Hill. There are superb views throughout (so it's worth choosing a clear day) and plenty of opportunity to enjoy the local wildlife. The route has several fairly steep climbs and descents, including one long climb up a flight of steps. There are also a couple of gates and one stile (but this is fairly low and has open sides for dogs to pass under). The paths can get quite muddy and slippery after wet weather. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Ridgeway Ramble: Princes Risborough to Chinnor Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.72442,-0.832571 This linear path follows the Ridgeway National Trail for most of its route, beginning in the heart of Princes Risborough and ending slightly above the town of Chinnor in Oxfordshire, although parking is available here if you are using two cars. The route takes you across undulating Chiltern countryside, past a golf course and includes one decent uphill pull before ending in an easy ridge-side section sandwiched with nature reserves. The route follows parts of the ancient Upper Icknield Way and offers great views over the Vale of Aylesbury from Lodge Hill. Allow between two and two and a half hours to complete, and bring your own refreshment as there's none on the way, although there are picnic tables near the end and a bench at the top of the hill.
Stone and the River Thame Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.804241,-0.864771 This circular walk falls into three parts, all roughly the same length. The first part is characterised by fieldside footpath walking and includes a moment passing through a farmyard, whilst the third part involves a climb uphill along made up driveway, but still through countryside. It is the middle part that is the star of the show though, as you walk alongside different branches of the sleepy River Thame, ending up at the entrance to Eythorpe Park. This section positively cries out for a rug and a picnic, or maybe a book, to while away a sunny afternoon doing nothing in particular. The walk covers around four miles and takes about eighty minutes of walking. Unless it has been exceptionally dry, walking boots are recommended.
Headley Heath and Cherkley Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.270854,-0.273889 A 4.5 mile circular walk through Headley Heath in Surrey. The heath forms part of the North Downs and the route gives a wonderful mixture of heath, chalk downland and woodland with great views over the Surrey Hills. The woodland/heath paths can get very muddy so waterproof boots are recommended unless you're walking after a long period of dry weather. There are several steep climbs and descents on route but in terms of obstacles there are just a few gates and no stiles. Most of the paths are bridleways so you're likely to be sharing them with horse riders and the heath is also a very popular dog walking area. Cattle are used to graze the heath at certain times. There are no toilet or cafe facilities but a mobile catering van is sometimes open within the car park. Approximate time 2 hours.
Cuddington and the Thame Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.793661,-0.930981 Two glorious villages stand out on this walk: Cuddington at the start point, with its various characterful thatched cottages and elegant pub in the centre (and start point to this walk, should you feel tempted), and Nether, or Lower Winchendon, which is similarly picturesque and boasts a Victorian circular stone postbox, perfectly positioned outside the church. In between, there are opportunities to sample and cross the small but peaceful River Thame on this circular four and a bit mile walk, for which you should allow around 90 minutes, excluding stops. As well as the river there are various brooks and springs, making for wet ground at times, so walking boots are a must at all times of the year. You will need to negotiate several gates, kissing gates and stiles along the way. Whilst most of the stiles have gaps or dog gates alongside, at least one has neither, so dogs may need a lift over. You will be sharing many of the pastures with cattle and sheep. There's a village store in Cuddington to stock up on snacks, but no other re-provisioning point on the walk itself.
Horsell Common: Planes, Racing Cars and Spaceships Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.333333,-0.548628 A 4 mile circular walk from Horsell Common near Woking in Surrey. The walk takes in a large section of the common (including the sandpits made famous in H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds) before heading out through the recently formed McLaren Park (alongside McLaren's Formula One technology centre) and on to reach Fairoaks airport. The walk then returns on the bridleway which runs alongside the many streams which feed the River Bourne. The route follows a mixture of heath/woodland paths, bridleways and one section along a wide grass verge alongside Chertsey Road – all of which can get fairly muddy after wet weather. The walk is almost entirely flat and there are no stiles, just a couple of gates. There is a cafe (Hanger Cafe) open to the public within Fairoaks Airport complex should you want refreshments. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Vernham Dean and Upton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.305939,-1.506096 A 5 mile circular walk from the pretty thatched village of Vernham Dean, situated in the north-west corner of Hampshire. The walk leaves the village to pass through woodland and crop fields to reach the adjacent village of Upton before heading north along quiet lanes via St Mary's Church and back down to Vernham Dean. The walk offers chance to enjoy lovely views across the rolling hills of the North Wessex Downs and there is also plenty of wildlife to enjoy along the way. The walk has several long steady gradients and there are a few gates and one long section of road walking (most of this road walking can be avoided by taking a shortcut over a stile and along a narrow footpath but this was very overgrown when we walked it – the choice is yours!). The paths will be muddy at certain times of the year and can be a bit overgrown in summer. Allow 2 to 2.5 hours (depending on the condition of the paths).
London River Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.505682,-0.14189 A city centre walk from and to Green Park Underground Station taking in many London landmarks and travelling along the River Thames along the South Bank until Tower Bridge and returning along the North Thames Path.
Thatcham and Greenham Common Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.399957,-1.274101 A 6 mile circular waterside walk in West Berkshire. The walk starts from the Nature Discovery Centre in Thatcham, heading past the main wildfowl lake before joining the towpath of the Kennet and Avon Canal. After following a stretch of the canal, the route turns south along a country lane to reach Greenham Common and then re-crosses the canal back to the Discovery Centre. The walk has a couple of steady hills but is mostly level and follows well made paths in the main. The underpass beneath the railway can flood with a few inches of water (ankle height) after heavy rain. There is one (open and low) stile plus a few gates. Cattle are used to graze the common at certain times of the year so take care with dogs. The Discovery Centre at the start of the walk has public toilets and a cafe. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Swinley Forest from Bagshot Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.36112,-0.701804 A 6 mile circular forest walk into Swinley Forest starting from Vicarage Road in Bagshot. The walk passes though a lovely mix of landscapes including pine forest, mixed woodland and open heath. There's plenty of opportunity to enjoy wildlife with both deer and a huge variety of birds in plentiful supply. The route has a few climbs and descents and there are no stiles, just a few gates. The forest tracks and paths are reasonably well made but of course can get muddy after periods of wet weather. This section of the forest is a popular mountain bike area so you will be sharing the paths with bikes and some areas of the forest are grazed using Belted Galloway cattle so take care with dogs. There are no toilet or refreshment facilities on route. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Clachnaben Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 56.971868,-2.579023 Scenic North-East Scotland low hills walk. Overlooking Deeside and Glen Dye this can be the start for more challenging summits. A peak at a little over 500m the initial ascent is easy as you follow the track through grazing fields and over a meandering stream. The trees offer shelter, but the terrain can be slippery and more steep (but the path has been enhanced by development work). Coming out of the treeline the summit can be clearly seen and the path carves round the hill in an increasingly steep gradient which has been laid with stone. A slight scramble to the very top has the reward of panoramic views around Deeside. An afternoon walk for the family and some degree of fitness is needed especially the last section.
Alresford Watercress Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.08859,-1.161764 A 5 mile circular walk from the Hampshire market town of New Alresford. The walk starts from the station car park (the terminus of the Watercress Line heritage steam railway) and crosses the town to join the riverside path along the pretty River Alre. The route then swings north and west through ancient lanes and farm tracks to reach Old Alresford with its beautiful church, before returning alongside streams to New Alresford. The riverside paths are stunning with chance to really appreciate the fast-running clear water that makes such a perfect environment for the base of Hampshire's watercress industry. The route follows a mixture of tarmac, stone and grass paths/lanes and whilst most of these are well-made, the route can get a little muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles and gates but there are a few long and steady climbs and descents. There are public toilets on Station Road near the start of the walk and there are many options for refreshments in the town itself. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Totternhoe Knolls Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.885786,-0.568403 A 4 mile circular walk near Dunstable in Bedfordshire taking in a couple of the ancient forts which populate Totternhoe Knolls in this area of grass chalkland. The route gives an option to climb to the top of Castle Hill (the remains of a Norman castle) which gives truly amazing views across the Dunstable Downs. The remainder of the journey descends to join a long section of cycleway before climbing back into the chalk hills alongside Maiden Bower, an iron-age hill fort. The route has no stiles or gates and the paths are generally wide and well-made but being chalk they can get quite muddy and slippery when wet. There are several climbs and descents both at the beginning and end but these are balanced with a long flat section along part of the National Cycle Network. There are no toilet or refreshment facilities on route. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Warfield - Northern Lanes Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.445673,-0.744984 This is a 7 mile circular walk, starting and ending at Frost Folly Country Car Park, Wellers Lane, Warfield. This is a fairly gentle walk through fields and country paths with some really pretty views of the Berkshire countryside. This walk also includes walking down Ashmore Lane, reputed to be one of the prettiest lanes in the borough, especially when the bluebells are out. Dog walkers please note that you will need to pass through a pony field at the start of the walk, please ensure that you have dogs on leads for this section of the walk. There are several gates plus one stile (but this has an open fence surround for dogs to pass through). The walk takes approximately 3 hours.
Fountain Inn and River Adur Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.932672,-0.321785 IMPORTANT NOTE: THIS ROUTE IS NOT PASSABLE AT PRESENT. The footbridge over the River Adur at the end of this walk is unsafe and closed, awaiting repair/replacement. It is expected to be closed from 16 Dec 2014 for up to 2 years and there is no alternative route. We will remove this note once the footbridge is replaced. A 6.5 mile circular pub walk from the Fountain Inn in Ashurst in West Sussex. The walk passes through fields and lanes, passing the village church and then skirting the nearby village of Partridge Green. The route goes on to join a short section of the Downs Link and then follows an embankment alongside the River Adur on the return leg. The route is relatively flat, with just a few gentle slopes, and the paths are a mixture of field paths, bridleways, quiet lanes and riverside embankments. Some of the field paths can get very muddy after wet weather so good waterproof boots are recommended. There are several gates and stiles on route, although all of the stiles have open fence surrounds making them relatively easy for dogs to pass through. A few of the fields may be holding cattle so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
May Beck and Sneaton High Moor Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.409884,-0.626237 An 8 mile circular walk through the North York Moors National Park. The route follows the pretty May Beck stream before passing through a coniferous plantation and then out into the open moorland. You'll have chance to enjoy views across the vast expanse of the moors as well as out to sea over the distant cliffs on clear days. The area is also a relatively quiet part of the National Park – we walked the route on a Saturday in June 2013 and didn't see another soul the whole way round. As with any high moorland walk the route is fairly exposed and conditions can change quickly so make sure you are well prepared with appropriate clothing and supplies of food and water. The walk follows a mixture of riverside, woodland and moor paths all of which can get muddy and some of which can be running with water at certain times of the year so waterproof boots are a must. There are three stiles on route all of which are tall with wire fence surrounds so dogs may need a lift over. There are several steady and long climbs and descents throughout and the paths are very uneven and rocky. The moor is home to many sheep so keep dogs under close control. Approximate time 4 hours.
Clay Bank and Greenhow Bottom Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.424217,-1.119518 A 3 mile circular walk from Clay Bank in the N York Moors. The walk has spectacular views throughout the journey across Greenhow Bottom, with its picturesque farms and Rosebury Topping as a backdrop. The route follows half well-made forest tracks and half mud bridleways/paths the latter of which can get very muddy in wet weather. There are no stiles or gates and the walk includes many climbs and descents, one climb being fairly steep. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Raincliffe Woods Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.28618,-0.462458 A 5.5 mile circular walk through the ancient Raincliffe Woods on the edge of the North York Moors. The walk meanders though beautiful ancient woodlands along mostly dirt tracks that can get very muddy in wet weather. There are no stiles and the walk includes several climbs and descents, one climb being fairly steep. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours. Raincliffe Woods has been described as the “the creme de la creme of woodland” by the Woodland Trust and comprises more that 400 acres of open access mainly deciduous woodlands. The woods are designated as Planted Ancient Woodland with some areas of Ancient Semi Natural Woodland. The woods are home to a very large range of native trees with some management to remove unwanted species from the area. In June, when the walk was completed, the paths were surrounded by a wide variety of wild flowers including bluebells and wild garlic.
Whitby Dracula Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.486008,-0.604498 A 4.5 mile circular trail from Whitby in North Yorkshire, taking in many of the landmarks that form the setting for Bram Stoker's classic novel, Dracula. The route follows a short section of the cliff top path (the Cleveland Way) with great views out across the North Sea, before looping in land on quiet rural lanes to reach the town. The remainder of the walk takes in many of the streets and landmarks of Whitby including the harbour, the swing bridge, East Crescent, the famous 199 steps and the ruins of Whitby Abbey. It doesn't take long to understand how the beguiling beauty of the town helped to inspire Stoker's creative flair – although on a bright sunny day there really is nothing sinister about Whitby! And you don't believe in vampires anyway, do you? The route follows a mixture of pavements, quiet lanes, paved/stone paths plus one section of grass footpath. There is one kissing gate plus several flights of steps and several climbs and descents throughout. Approximate time 2 hours, plus additional time to visit any of the attractions.
Kilburn Woods and White Horse Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.240672,-1.208811 A 6 mile circular and fairly strenuous walk taking in the steep valley slopes of Kilburn Woods and the Kilburn White Horse chalk figure set into the hillside. The route starts from the Sutton Bank North York Moors visitor centre and heads out on the level path following the edge of Roulston Scar, giving unrivalled views across the Vales of York and Mowbray. The walk then descends down the steep paths into the beautiful Kilburn Woods before climbing back up the escarpment alongside the chalk horse. The woodland is very picturesque, particularly in spring when the area is alive with the sound of cuckoos and the woodland floor is smothered with a sea of bluebells. The walk is quite strenuous with several climbs and descents throughout, some of which are fairly steep and can be quite muddy or slippery, particularly after wet weather. The beginning and end of the walk follows the path along the edge of the scar and is very exposed. There are no stiles or gates on route, but there are several flights of steps. There are toilet facilities at the car park at the start. Allow 3 to 3.5 hours.
Moors Inn 8 mile Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.281843,-0.872676 An 8 mile circular pub walk from The Moors Inn in Appleton-le-Moors in North Yorkshire. The walk follows pretty ancient stone lanes with mixed hedgerows away from Appleton-le-Moors and passes through a small belt of woodland to reach the picturesque village of Hutton-le-Hole. The route then continues across meadows and on to follow paths across the North York Moors and back into Lastingham village. Passing through Spaunton, the route then returns along more ancient lanes. A really great mix of everything, this walk gives you a taste of the region with villages, lanes, moors, woodland and, of course, lots of sheep! (Note: A 6.5 mile easier circular route which follows the same paths but omits the loop into the moors is also available on iFootpath). Most of the route is fairly easy walking with just gentle and long gradients, although the paths can get quite muddy after periods of rain. The loop into the moors and round to Spaunton village has several fairly steep climbs/descents and you will also need to cross a small stream using stepping stones. There are no stiles on route but several gates and kissing gates. There are sheep roaming free within the villages and the moors so keep dogs under control. You may also come across a few cattle in one field. Allow 4 hours. The Moors Inn is open every day from 11am to 11pm and serves a selection of great food and a range of local ales. Walkers and dogs are very welcome and there are also 7 en-suite bed and breakfast rooms available.
Moors Inn 6.5 mile Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.281843,-0.872676 A 6.5 mile circular pub walk from The Moors Inn in Appleton-le-Moors in North Yorkshire. The walk follows pretty ancient stone lanes with mixed hedgerows away from Appleton-le-Moors and passes through a small belt of woodland to reach the picturesque village of Hutton-le-Hole. The route then continues across meadows and on to reach the edge of the moors. Passing through Spaunton, the route then returns along more ancient lanes. A really great mix of everything, this walk gives you a taste of the region with villages, lanes, moors, woodland and, of course, lots of sheep! (Note: An 8 mile more strenuous circular route which follows the same paths but includes an additional loop into the moors is also available on iFootpath). Most of the route is fairly easy walking with just gentle and long gradients, although the paths can get quite muddy after periods of rain. The road climbing up to Spaunton village is the only steep section. There are no stiles on route but several gates and kissing gates. There are sheep roaming free within the villages and so keep dogs under control. You may also come across a few cattle in one field. Allow 3 hours. The Moors Inn is open every day from 11am to 11pm and serves a selection of great food and a range of local ales. Walkers and dogs are very welcome and there are also 7 en-suite bed and breakfast rooms available.
Helmsley and Ash Dale Woods Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.246096,-1.061526 A 2 mile easy circular walk from the classic medieval market town of Helmsley in North Yorkshire. The walk begins in the market square before heading out alongside the beck to reach playing fields and sheep pastures. The route then skirts through the edge of Ash Dale Woods before following the quiet roads back into town. The walk is relatively flat with just some very steady inclines and there are no stiles, just a few gates. Half the paths are well made or pavements, but the field and woodland section can get quite muddy after wet weather. Allow 1 hour.
Goathland and Grosmont Rail Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.400962,-0.712416 A 4 mile linear walk along the old rail line from Goathland to Grosmont with the return leg taken on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, a heritage steam railway. This popular walk follows the route of the 1836 railway which began with horse-drawn carriages along the line. Today, the remaining cinder track gives chance to reflect on the history of the railways as well as an opportunity to enjoy a range of beautiful North York Moors scenery including ancient woodland, fast flowing becks and rolling hills. The route is almost entirely downhill (the train doing the hard work on the return leg!) with just a short incline to contend with right at the end. There are no stiles on route, just several gates including a few kissing gates. The paths are all well-made and there is just one section alongside the river that becomes quite rocky with lots of steps within the rocks and tree roots. There are sheep on some of the paths so take care with dogs. The frequency of the train service varies throughout the days and months, so check on the website before you travel (www. nymr.co.uk). Dogs are allowed on the train for an additional charge. Allow 2 hours for the walk plus an additional 30 minutes for the rail journey.
Robin Hood's Bay and Maw Wyke Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.435967,-0.536088 A 6 mile circular walk from Robin Hood's Bay on the North Yorkshire coast. The route joins the Cleveland Way coastal path heading north to reach Maw Wyke, before turning inland through a caravan park to join the Cinder Track, a disused railway line, for the return leg. The paths can all get quite muddy after periods of wet weather and the Cleveland Way has several climbs and descents through gullies. The surfaces are at some points paved with rocks as steps but these can also get quite slippery. There are no stiles, just a few gates and kissing gates. Keep children and dogs under close control on the coastal path as the cliff edges are unfenced and have very sheer drops. Where landslides disrupt the route there will be diversions into the adjacent fields which are likely to be holding both sheep and cattle (although the fields are very big so this doesn't really pose a problem). You are likely to be sharing the return leg along the old railway with both horse riders and cyclists. There are public toilets at the car park at the start. Allow 2.5 to 3 hours.
Pickering and Pickering Woods Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.244131,-0.780916 A 6 mile circular walk from the market town of Pickering in the North York Moors. The route heads north out of the town following Pickering Beck and on through the paths of Pickering Woods. The walk then crosses the beck and the railway before returning along a quiet country lane to explore the town itself. The route is relatively flat with just a couple of small gradients. The woodland and field footpaths are very uneven and can get very muddy after wet weather. There is one stile (with a gap in the fence alongside for dogs) plus several gates. One of the fields you pass through is likely to be holding sheep. At one point you will need to cross the railway line at an un-signalled crossing so take particular care with children and dogs here. There are public toilets in the short stay car park which you pass near the start of the walk. Allow 2.5 to 3 hours.
Thornton-le-Dale, Ellerburn and Longlands Lane Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.235891,-0.720252 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the beautiful village of Thornton-le-Dale in the North York Moors. The walk takes in the village itself along with the nearby hamlet of Ellerburn and the pretty paths alongside the village's beck. (A shorter version of this walk – 2.5 miles – is also available on iFootpath which omits the final loop along Longlands Lane). The paths are a mixture of pavements and woodland/field paths, the latter of which can get muddy. There are a few steady inclines and the route includes 3 stiles (all of which have adjacent dog gates) and several kissing gates. You will be sharing some of the fields with sheep so take care with dogs. There are public toilets alongside the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Thornton-le-Dale and Ellerburn Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.235891,-0.720252 A 2.5 mile circular walk from the beautiful village of Thornton-le-Dale in the North York Moors. The walk takes in the village itself along with the nearby hamlet of Ellerburn and the pretty paths alongside the village's beck. (A longer version of this walk – 3.5 miles – is also available on iFootpath which includes an extra loop along Longlands Lane). The paths are a mixture of pavements and woodland/field paths, the latter of which can get muddy. There are a few steady inclines and the route includes 3 stiles (all of which have adjacent dog gates) and several kissing gates. You will be sharing some of the fields with sheep so take care with dogs. There are public toilets alongside the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Llandrindod Wells Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.238611,-3.377022 A 5 mile circular walk that starts and ends in the interesting town of Llandrindod Wells. The walk can be started in the centre of the town or extended by starting down by the lake where there is parking, a restaurant and public toilets. There are several stiles which will require dogs being lifted over and in wet weather the path can become boggy and will require good footwear. There are two or three fairly steep but short climbs and the views are certainly worth the effort. Dogs must be kept under control at all times given this is sheep country.
Cloughton and Crook Ness Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.332787,-0.445755 A 4 mile circular walk from the small North Yorkshire village of Cloughton. The walk follows the old railway line heading south and then cuts across to the coast via a quiet lane. After following a section of the Cleveland Way coastal path the route rejoins the old railway line to return to Cloughton. The route takes in a particular peaceful section of Yorkshire Coast, in an area generally less popular with tourists, taking in the views across horse paddocks, crops fields and the beautiful cliff rock formations and out across the North Sea. Three quarters of the route follows well-made paths (tarmac lanes and the old cinder track of the rail line) with the final coastal section following arable field edges which can be quite muddy. There are two gates (at the start and the end) and no stiles on route and just a few gentle gradients on the lanes. The only challenging parts of the route (and the reason for a difficulty rating of 3) are the flights of uneven rocky steps which take you down and up several ravines within the coastal path. Approximate time 2 hours.
Esk Valley Walk - Egton to Whitby Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.437559,-0.761467 A 10 mile linear walk following part of the Esk Valley Walk, a Regional Route long distance path in the North York Moors, the return leg being completed by train. The walk largely follows the route of the River Esk and the train line through the base of the river's valley taking in the rolling hills, quiet lanes and agricultural fields that cover the region. The route has several climbs and descents throughout and the paths (through woodland and fields) can get very muddy after periods of rain. There are 7 stiles (some of which are tall with enclosed fence surrounds so dogs may need a lift over) and lots of gates and flights of steps along the way. Near the start of the walk you will cross the River Esk via a series of stepping stones (although you can omit this part if you wish). You will be sharing the paths and fields with a whole array of animals – we came across sheep, cattle, goats, geese, hens, turkeys and donkeys – so take particular care with dogs. You will also need to cross the rail line several times at un-signalled crossings so keep children and dogs under close control at these points. There are public toilets in Egton near the start of the walk. Approximate time 5 hours.
Goathland and Mallyan Spout Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.400903,-0.717528 A short walk from the famous village of Goathland in the heart of the North York Moors. The walk gives you chance to explore the village itself (made famous as the set of TV drama ‘Heartbeat') then descends into the valley to visit the Mallyan Spout waterfall and an enchanting stretch of the West Beck river before joining a section of the old railway for the climb back to the village. There are several climbs and descents throughout (including long flights of steps) and to reach the Mallyan Spout waterfall you will need to scramble over a few hundred yards of rocks and boulders which can be very slippery so sturdy waterproof footwear is a must. There are no stiles, just a few gates. You will be sharing some of the paths with sheep so keep dogs under close control. There are toilets alongside the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Danby, Oakley Side and Clitherbeck Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.465257,-0.894545 A 3 mile fairly strenuous circular walk from the Moors Centre at Danby in the heart of the North York Moors. The route heads out along the side of the Esk Valley on a quiet lane between pastures, before climbing up to join lanes and paths through the open moors for the return leg. There are stunning views across the moorland and valley throughout. The walk includes several long and fairly steep slopes both up and down. The paths are a mixture of field/moorland and quiet lanes, the former of which can get very muddy and boggy. There are four stiles on route – two of which have dog gates, but of the other two, one is a tall ladder stile and the other has wire fence surrounds so dogs will need a lift over. Some of the fields may be holding cattle and of course the moors are home to lots of sheep. There are public toilets at the visitor centre at the start of the walk. Approximate time 2 hours.
Kintbury Canal and Meadows Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.402367,-1.447092 A 4.5 mile circular walk from the Berkshire village of Kintbury, one of the most sought after places to live in England. The walk follows a short section of the Kennet and Avon Canal then heads south through beautiful local pastures and meadows before looping back into the village passing the church and village centre. The walk includes just a few gentle gradients and some of the paths can get quite muddy at certain times of the year. There are several kissing gates and a total of 9 stiles – whilst most of these have open fencing surrounds or purpose built adjacent dog gates, a couple may prove a bit trickier for dogs so they may need a lift over. There are public toilets in the car park at the start. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Whitchurch and River Test Mills Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.229736,-1.341096 A 5.5 mile circular walk from Whitchurch, a pretty Hampshire town on the River Test. The walk gives you chance to see many of the former water mills that were at the heart of local industry producing everything from cloth to corn and paper along with the pretty village of Freefolk, home to one of the longest thatched buildings in Britain. The route follows a mixture of field and woodland paths which can get quite muddy at certain times of the year. There are just a few gentle climbs and descents with no stiles on route (just lots of kissing gates and footbridges). Some of the fields may be holding a few sheep, cattle or horses so take care with dogs. There are public toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 2 to 3 hours.
Aldeburgh Circular Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.159511,1.604318 A 6 mile circular walk through Aldeburgh and Slaughden, then inland following the River Alde before crossing Aldeburgh Marshes to return to the town centre. The walk is mainly on level ground with no stiles but several gates and wooden bridges. Approximate time for the walk is 2.5 to 3 hours. Public toilets are available in Aldeburgh at Moot Hall and Slaughden Quay. Aldeburgh has many interesting buildings and shops and its most famous resident was Benjamin Britten. Slaughden was once a thriving fishing port and has an interesting history being well worth a visit.
Friston North Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.191336,1.527964 A short and easy 2 mile walk around the northern area of Friston across arable land with the chance of seeing skylarks, buzzards and hen harriers. There are no stiles and two gates to negotiate. Approx time 1 hour.
Stoughton Down and Kingley Vale Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.907398,-0.842115 A 4.5 mile circular walk in a really picturesque part of the South Downs National Park. The walk begins in Stoughton Down before climbing high into the Kingley Vale Nature Reserve where the climb is rewarded with spectacular views both to the north and south. The walk then descends to the pretty village of Stoughton before returning to the car park. The walk has one long climb and an equivalent descent. The tracks are all fairly wide and are, in the most, well made with stone with only a few parts under the trees that can get quite muddy. The last mile of the route is along a quiet country road. There are no stiles or gates to negotiate so, if you're up for the challenge, it would be possible to get a rugged push chair around the route. Approximate time 2 hours.
Friston East Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.187581,1.528518 A 3 mile circular walk to the east of Friston across rolling farmland and the village of Knodishall. There are no stiles or gates to negotiate. Approx. time 1 hour.
Thorpeness and Sizewell Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.178251,1.614149 This is a 5.3 mile circular walk starting in Thorpeness, with its many interesting and quirky properties, crossing woodland and grazing marshes before reaching Sizewell. This is followed by a relaxing stroll along the Suffolk Coast Path back to Thorpeness. There are two gates along the walk and no stiles. Approx time taken 2.5 hours. Thorpeness was created by Glencairn Stuart Ogilvie who purchased the Sizewell estate in 1910 and transformed the fishing hamlet into a holiday resort wih a boating lake (The Meare), a golf course, a contry club and several mock Tudor houses, incuding the famous House in the Clouds. The Vulcan public house in Sizewell or the Beach Cafe in the Sizewell car park make excellent half way refreshment stops, whilst the Dolphin public house serves good meals and has a large beer garden.
Woodbridge and Martlesham Creek Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.09042,1.316077 A 4 mile circular walk starting in Woodbridge taking in the estuary of the River Deben, Martlesham Creek and then returning to the town itself. Woodbridge has been a centre for boat building and rope making since the middle ages and has many interesting buildings. Sir Francis Drake is said to have had ships built in Woodbridge. The working Tide Mill is only one of two in the UK and was first recorded in 1170 when it was operated by Augustinian Canons. Water fowl and swifts can be seen along the estuary. The walk is best done at low water given that part of the walk is along the foreshore and can be flooded during spring tides. There are no stiles but two fairly lengthy sets of steps and some narrow pathways would make it difficult for pushchairs. Approx walk time 2 hours
Hamble Ramble Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.88378,-1.305191 This relatively easy walk belies its six miles and takes in both pretty villages (Old Burleston and Hamble) at the start, and some great coastal views out over the River Hamble later on. The walk is circular, but ferry-dependent, so check out the operating times given in Section 2. There's an option to take coffee or something stronger at the Jolly Sailor pub near the start (a short detour), and further watering opportunities in Hamble and towards the end of the walk, but given the wide open vistas and opportunities to take in bracing sea air, why not take a picnic? Children in particular will love the Hamble Ferry, a short (five minute) hop over the water, a journey that nicely delineates the two parts of the walk. Along the latter stretch look out for fish life trapped by the tide in the mudflats and for the wrecks of old ships, similarly ensnared, albeit for longer. Allow two and a half hours for the walk, maybe a bit longer if you have to wait for the ferry, although the service is pretty regular. It's reasonable to say this is probably a fair weather walk, although one that offers different versions of itself depending on the time of year and the state of the tide.
Castle Hedingham Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.99057,0.597565 A 4 mile circular walk from the idyllic medieval village of Castle Hedingham in Essex. The route follows a loop north into the surrounding arable farmland and you will also have the opportunity to visit the namesake Norman Castle should you wish (limited opening times and entrance fees apply). The route is relatively flat with just a few gentle gradients. There are no stiles and just a couple of gates within the church yard. The paths are a mixture of wide stone tracks with a few narrow field paths, the latter of which can be quite muddy. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours (longer if you wish to explore the castle).
Charsfield Short Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.161819,1.294243 A 4 mile walk around the pretty village of Charsfield which initially climbs to give good views over the village and then travels along quiet country lanes and wide footpaths crossing orchards and arable land. The classic book 'Akenfield: Portrait of an English Village' by Ronald Blythe is based upon the village of Charsfield. The Three Horseshoes public house makes a good refreshment stop after the walk. There are no stiles or gates to negotiate and whilst the lanes carry little traffic, care should be taken along these sections. Approximate time 2 hours.
California Country Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.379537,-0.873875 A 2 mile circular walk around California Country Park in Berkshire. The park covers 100 acres and comprises lowland heath, bogland, a lake, a play area with paddling pool and a cafe. The park was originally opened in 1931 as an amusement park and zoo called California in England, the name California being taken from an old local brickworks. Over the years the site has housed a circus, miniature railway, speedway track and holiday camp. Today, the site is managed by Wokingham Borough Council for leisure and wildlife. The route is relatively flat although some of the paths can be very muddy after rain and in the winter months, so good boots are a must at all times except after long dry summer spells. There are several kissing gates on route plus sections of boardwalk. Cattle can be grazing one small area of the park for conservation of the heath. There is a cafe alongside the car park at the start of the walk. Allow 1 hour.
Theale and Sulham Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.438529,-1.072855 A 5 mile circular walk from the village of Theale, near Reading in Berkshire. Beginning in Theale's High Street, the walk soon leaves behind the residential streets to pass the golf course and another hamlet before crossing farmland to reach the nearby village of Sulham. The return leg follows an ancient lane (now a bridleway) passing through the historic Sulham Estate. The route is relatively flat with just a few gentle gradients. Whilst most of the route follows tarmac and stone paths, about one third of it follows woodland and field paths that can get quite muddy after periods of rain. There are a few gates plus three stiles (two will be easy for dogs with large gaps alongside, but one has a tight wooden fence surround that larger dogs may find more difficult to squeeze through). One of the fields may be holding livestock. Approximate time 2 hours.
Bramshill Forest and Eversley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.345825,-0.909686 An 8 mile circular walk starting in Bramshill Forest and taking in the local woodland, paddocks, riverside paths and the pretty village of Eversley. The route gives a lovely mix of environments and you'll see plenty of wildlife including butterflies, damselflies, birds, deer and horses (the latter not being wild of course!). There are several pubs within Eversley that you pass by if you want refreshments on the way round. The route is relatively flat with just a few gentle gradients. Some of the paths can be quite overgrown, muddy and narrow at certain times of the year so good waterproof boots and protective clothing for arms and legs (unless you're immune to gorse and nettles!) are recommended. The walk passes through narrow paths within Bramshill Forest (where you may come across adders) and several paddocks containing horses so take particular care with dogs at these points. There are several kissing gates on route plus three stiles – all of these have wooden fence surrounds which were certainly open enough for our standard poodle to fit through. Approximate time 3 to 4 hours.
Burrough Hill and Leicestershire Round Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.695905,-0.867861 A 6.5 mile circular walk from the ancient site of the Burrough Hill Iron Age hill fort near Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire. This part of Leicestershire is known as High Leicestershire. It has particularly picturesque rolling hills and there are many points where the views are really beautiful so make sure you walk on a clear day. The walk gives chance to explore the fort before joining the Leicestershire Round long-distance path heading through pastures and fields down to the village of Somerby. The route then crosses over to the village of Burrough on the Hill before heading north through more arable fields to rejoin the Leicestershire Round for the journey back to the fort. There are several climbs and descents throughout and the field paths can be very muddy after periods of wet weather and in winter. You will be sharing the paths with sheep for lots of the route and there are also a couple of places (including the fort) where cattle are grazing, so take care with dogs. There are lots of gates on route plus a few narrow footbridges, a couple of flights of steps and three stiles (all of which have adjacent dog gates or open fencing surrounds so they shouldn't pose a problem for most dogs). There are public toilets at the car park at the start of the walk, along with several picnic benches. Allow 3 hours.
Hambleton and Rutland Water Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.658413,-0.670397 A 4.5 mile circular walk around the Hambleton Peninsula which is surrounded on three sides by Rutland Water. The easy to navigate route (the water will guide you!) gives lovely views across the reservoir the whole way round. You'll have chance to see plenty of wildfowl and the route also passes through two woodlands which are full of bluebells in the spring. The walk has several steady climbs including one fairly long climb at the end. There are no stiles but several gates including at least one kissing gate. The start of the walk includes crossing a sheep pasture (which can be muddy) but the rest of the walk follows a well made stone track all the way round. You'll be sharing the path with cyclists and sheep so take care with children and dogs. Allow 2 hours.
Fotheringhay and Woodnewton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.52714,-0.44059 A 4.5 mile circular walk from the picturesque village of Fotheringhay in north-east Northamptonshire. The route leaves behind the pretty village with its stone built cottages, crossing arable fields to reach the neighbouring village of Woodnewton. The walk returns through more arable fields and a path running alongside Willow Brook, a pretty shallow chalk stream. The walk is relatively flat with just a few steady slopes. The paths are generally field paths across arable land and these can get quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are several gates and one stile (which does have open fencing underneath that most dogs should be able to squeeze under). Approximate time 2 hours.
Fulbeck and the Lincoln Cliff Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.042231,-0.585933 A 4.5 mile circular walk from Fulbeck, one of the ‘cliff villages' that lie on the limestone escarpment known as the Lincoln Cliff or Lincoln Edge that runs from the River Humber down to Grantham. The route follows quiet lanes and field paths giving a peaceful setting in which to enjoy the views north towards Lincoln and across the Trent Valley to east Nottinghamshire. The walk follows a mixture of village/farm lanes and field and grass tracks, the latter of which can get quite muddy after periods of rain. There are no stiles and just a couple of gates. The walk includes several climbs and descents throughout. Allow 2 hours.
Swinstead and the Drift Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.790424,-0.491598 A 3 mile circular walk from the Lincolnshire village of Swinstead passing through fields and chalk pasture to reach the West Glen River. A climb up the opposite side of the valley is followed by a short section following The Drift, an ancient highway, before a return trip across the valley. The route has several climbs and descents including one very steep climb up through an uneven rocky path within woodland so take extra care here. The paths will be very muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are six stiles on route and all of these have enclosed fence surrounds so dogs may need a lift over. The large pasture alongside the West Glen River is used for grazing sheep and the fields are used for rearing game birds so keep dogs under close control. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Woolsthorpe by Belvoir and Grantham Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.897108,-0.756382 A 5 mile circular walk from the small Lincolnshire village of Woolsthorpe by Belvoir, which sits on the county border with Leicestershire. The village is most famous for the nearby Belvoir Castle and the impressive 19th century fortress dominates the hilltops here and is visible for most of the walk, giving it a strange fairytale-like feel. The route explores the village then moves on to a stretch of the Grantham Canal towpath before returning via an ancient lane and a stretch of the Viking Way. The route has just a few gentle inclines and the paths are a mixture of pavements, stone lanes/paths and grass towpaths/field paths, the latter of which will be muddy after wet weather. The final large hillside pasture you cross is used for grazing cattle so take care with dogs at this point. There are several gates plus two stiles, both of which have gaps alongside that will be suitable for most dogs. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
The Packhorse and Chazey Heath Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.498038,-1.00522 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Packhorse near Mapledurham in South Oxfordshire. The Packhorse was once a farm within the Mapledurham House estate dating back to the 1600s, but now provides an ideal place to enjoy refreshments before or after a walk in the Chilterns. The walking route performs a simple loop around this southern section of the Chilterns AONB, including a short stretch of the Chiltern Way, with chance to enjoy small belts of woodland, open fields and village lanes. The walk has a few gentle gradients, there are no gates and just one stile (with a dog gate beneath which is large enough for most dogs). The route follows a mixture of lanes plus field and woodland footpaths, some of which can be quite muddy in winter and after rain. There are a couple of sections of road walking with no pavements so take particular care along these parts of the route. Allow 1.5 hours.
Beenham and Douai Abbey Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.416366,-1.161457 A 3 mile circular walk from the West Berkshire village of Beenham. The route follows pretty stretches of woodland and arable fields to reach the nearby village of Upper Woolhampton where you'll have chance to admire the buildings of Douai Abbey, a Benedictine monastery. The walk returns through arable fields, grazing pastures and mixed woodlands where you'll enjoy a host of wildlife and wild flowers. The walk has a few gentle inclines and the woodland paths and pastures can be very muddy at certain times of the year so waterproof boots are recommended. There is one section of road walking so take care of traffic at this point and two of the fields are likely to be holding cattle so take care with dogs. There are three stiles to negotiate and all of these have open wooden fence surrounds so should be straightforward for most dogs. Allow 1 to 1.5 hours.
The White Hart and Mill Bourne Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.347322,-0.60293 A 3.5 mile circular pub walk from the White Hart in Chobham. The White Hart is believed to date from the 1500s, and is one of the oldest properties in the village. During the recent renovation, great pains were taken to preserve the character of such a venerable old hostelry, which is now revived and refreshed. The walking route follows the southern bank of the Mill Bourne through pleasant water meadows giving open views and a chance to see lots of meadow flowers and perhaps even a kingfisher. The return leg crosses horse paddocks and grazing pastures to join an ancient lane back to the village. The walk is almost entirely flat and the paths cross a mixture of grass meadows, paddocks, pastures and woodland and so can be very muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are several gates plus six stiles (two of these are entirely enclosed by wire fencing so dogs may need a lift over). There is one section of road walking along a quiet lane so take care with children and beware of any traffic. Two of the fields you cross are likely to be holding grazing sheep and cattle so take care with dogs. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
Rowbarge Canal and River Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.394746,-1.178453 A 5.5 mile circular pub walk from the Rowbarge in Woolhampton. The Rowbarge enjoys a lovely position right on the canal with a large garden giving you chance to enjoy all the canal activity while you savour great ales and food. The walking route follows a long stretch of the Kennet and Avon Canal towpath along to Aldermaston Wharf with chance to enjoy plenty of wildlife and canal boats messing about on the water. The return leg loops south, crossing branches of the River Kennet and its reed beds, following quiet lanes and crossing grazing pastures. The walk is relatively flat with just a few gentle inclines. The surfaces are a mixture of stone and grass towpaths, stone lanes and field paths, many of which can be quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain. Some of the paths can also be overgrown in the summer so shorts are not recommended unless you are immune to nettles! There are several kissing gates on route but no stiles. Some of the fields you cross are likely to be holding cattle so take care with dogs. There is one short section of road walking along the edge of an A-road so beware of the traffic and take particular care with children. Allow 2.5 to 3 hours.
The Bailiwick and Windsor Great Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.41974,-0.588219 A 4.5 mile circular pub walk from the Bailiwick pub in Englefield Green. This lovely pub sits right alongside one of the entrances to Windsor Great Park, and makes an ideal place to get coffee and a danish or a pint and lunch before or after your walk. The walk route follows the wide tarmac rides around the south east corner of Windsor Great Park. You'll have chance to see the Obelisk Pond, the polo lawns, Virginia Water lake and enjoy the vast expanses of landscaped parkland. There are just a few gentle inclines, with just one gate and no stiles to negotiate. The paths are all either tarmac or well made stone surfaces, so it would be suitable for pushchairs should you wish. Dogs are welcome in Windsor Great Park but must be kept on the lead for a couple of the sections – see the signs along the way. Allow 2 to 2.5 hours.
Mill House, Butter Wood and Basingstoke Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.2633,-0.953363 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Mill House in North Warnborough, near Hook. The Mill House has its own large mill pond set within beautiful gardens making it the perfect relaxing place for refreshments before or after your walk. The walking route provides a lovely mix of environments, allowing you to explore open heath, mixed woodland, fields and a long stretch of a pretty canal towpath. You'll also have chance to explore the impressive ruins of Odiham Castle along the way. The walk is relatively flat with just a couple of gentle slopes. The paths are a mixture of stone towpaths, quiet lanes and woodland paths, the latter of which can be very muddy so good waterproof footwear is recommended after periods of rain. There are several gates, a few squeeze gaps plus two stiles to negotiate (both of which have adjacent gaps which should be easy for most dogs). There is one short section of road walking so take care with children here. The heath is grazed by cattle for conservation and one field may be holding a couple of smallholding cows so take care with dogs. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
The White Hart and Shabden Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.298001,-0.168051 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the White Hart in Chipstead, Surrey. This classic pub offers a great choice of real ales and wines to accompany tasty meals from fresh and local ingredients. The village lies on the top of the North Downs and provides the perfect access point to explore the surrounding countryside of mature trees, hedgerows, open fields, rolling hills and farmland. The route follows a loop around Shabden Park, a working farm which is famed for its sweeping views of rolling hills, sheep-grazed valleys, wildflowers and butterflies. The route is fairly strenuous with several climbs and descents throughout and the woodland and field paths, whilst mainly firm, can get a little muddy after periods of rain and in winter. There are no stiles but several kissing gates to negotiate. Most of the park is a working farm and the valley fields are used to graze sheep and cattle so close all gates after you and take particular care with dogs. The long section through Long Plantation is fenced and so dogs can be let off the lead for this stretch. Allow 1 to 1.5 hours.
Shepperton Wine Bar and Grill and Desborough Island Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.388224,-0.454278 A 4.5 mile circular pub walk from Shepperton Wine Bar and Grill in Surrey. The Wine Bar and Grill has a menu focussed on the chargrill with ribs, steaks and burgers alongside fresh fish, seafood and salads. The walking route is a perfect outing for all the family with something for everyone. There's a ferry ride, peaceful river side paths, sandy beaches, beautiful woodland and the hustle and bustle of the streets in this corner of Surrey. The walk includes a short trip on a pedestrian ferry. This runs every 15 minutes (on the quarter hour) from 8am weekdays, from 9am on Saturdays and from 10am on Sundays with the last ferry at 5.30pm each day. The cost is £2 for adults, £1 for children and dogs travel free (correct August 2013). The walk follows a mixture of tarmac pavements and stone/dirt woodland and riverside paths. The latter, whilst generally well made, can get a little muddy in winter and after long periods of rain. The route is almost entirely flat and there are no stiles or gates, just a number of flights of steps. Allow 2 hours, plus extra time to wait for the ferry.
The Horse and Groom and Hare Hatch Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.494432,-0.844421 A 3.5 mile circular pub walk from the Horse and Groom in Hare Hatch, Berkshire. The Horse and Groom is a 300 year old coaching inn with beautiful beams and flagstones. The walk gives you chance to explore the surrounding countryside, a mixture of large arable fields and horse paddocks with a few small sections of woodland and lovely views. The walk is almost entirely flat and follows a mixture of field edge paths and grass tracks some of which can be a little overgrown, narrow and/or muddy at different times of the year. There are a couple of short sections of road walking so take care of traffic at these points. You will need to negotiate 6 stiles, the last 3 of which have wire fenced surrounds so dogs may need a lift over. Two of the fields are likely to be holding horses so take care with children and dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
The Tally Ho and Blackwater Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.357007,-0.887202 A 2 mile circular pub walk from the Tally Ho in Eversley, in north-east Hampshire. The Tally Ho is a beautiful Hampshire farmhouse lovingly converted to a great pub with open fires in the winter and an enormous garden to enjoy in the summer. The short walk follows a section of the Blackwater Valley path, a long distance path which meanders alongside the River Blackwater, to reach the beautiful old ford, weir and mill at nearby Lower Common. If you wish, there's chance to extend the walk by exploring Bramshill Forest at this point. The return leg follows a quiet lane and woodland footpath before joining the main road back to the pub. You'll have chance to meet lots of horses in the paddocks along the way and enjoy the beautiful River Blackwater which is a haven for a variety of wildlife. The walk is almost entirely flat and the paths can be a little overgrown in the summer and can get muddy after rain and in the winter. The route passes through three paddocks that are likely to be holding horses so take care with children and dogs. You will need to negotiate several gates, a long narrow footbridge and two stiles (both of which have open fencing surrounds which should be suitable for most dogs to pass through). Allow 1 hour.
The Leather Bottle and Whitewater Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.311772,-0.950356 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Leather Bottle in Mattingley, Hampshire. The Leather Bottle is a classic old village inn, providing relaxed comfortable surroundings for refreshments before or after your walk. The walking route is really delightful with chance to enjoy a pretty avenue lined with lime trees, open fields, the banks of the beautiful River Whitewater and a spectacular timber-framed church. The walk has just a few gentle climbs and descents throughout and some of the field paths can be quite muddy after rain and in winter. There are several stiles along the way and these could be a challenge for less able people as some are quite tall and others are a little rickety and unstable. All the stiles do, however, have open fence surrounds which should be easy for most dogs to pass through. There are a couple of sections of road walking so take care of any traffic. A couple of the fields are large open pastures and, whilst there wasn't any livestock present when we walked, there's a chance you may come across cattle here. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Greyhound and Besselsleigh Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.712911,-1.335708 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Greyhound in Besselsleigh, Oxfordshire. The Greyhound is a handsome and welcoming village pub, built from Cotswold stone some 400 years ago with a large garden to enjoy in the summer and a great selection of cask ales. The walking route takes in the surrounding classic English agricultural countryside with plenty of birdlife to enjoy. We saw red kites, woodpeckers and a kestrel on our journey. The route has just a few gentle slopes and you will need to negotiate several gates plus three stiles (all of which have open fence surrounds which should be suitable for most dogs). The paths cross a number of farm fields which can be very muddy in winter and after periods of rain and can be a little overgrown in the summer. Some of the fields are part of a dairy farm and could be holding grazing cattle so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Duck House and Ruislip Woods Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.576971,-0.427326 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Duck House in Ruislip, Middlesex. The Duck House has lovely views across the adjacent duck pond and bowling green, and has a large courtyard and conservatory making it ideal for lunch before or after your walk, regardless of the weather. The walking route heads north past the site of an old castle to reach Ruislip Woods – a beautiful mixed woodland and National Nature Reserve. You're likely to see plenty of wildlife with the woodland being home to everything from badgers and foxes, to woodpeckers, squirrels and owls. The walk has just a couple of long but steady gradients. The woodland paths are all fairly wide but they are uneven with roots and can get very muddy after periods of rain and in the winter. There is one single gate on route and no stiles. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Old Orchard and Colne Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.602761,-0.490592 A 4.5 mile circular pub from the Old Orchard in Harefield, Middlesex. The Old Orchard's hillside position affords it some of the best views of any pub, an uninterrupted panorama of the Colne Valley lakes with their beautiful wooded slopes. In the summer you can enjoy your refreshments on the terrace or in the large garden to enjoy these views but, if the weather is less inviting, the inside of the pub is just as welcoming with open fires and plenty of cask ales to choose from. The walking route has something for everyone. A stretch along the bustling canal towpath, meandering paths between the lakes plus woodland and quiet farm tracks. There are many steady climbs and descents throughout. The paths are a mixture of well-made stone towpaths and tracks, plus field and woodland paths, the latter of which can be narrow and a little overgrown and can get muddy after periods of rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate one gate and two stiles (both stiles having open fencing alongside which should be easy for most dogs to negotiate). The stiles and gate can be avoided by changing the first few hundred yards of the walk – leave the car park via the vehicle entrance and turn left down the hill until you reach a right hand bend with a stile to your left. Pick up the main directions here from the last sentence of section one. Approximate time 2 hours.
The White Hart and Knole Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.255022,0.198977 A 3.5 mile circular pub walk from the White Hart in Sevenoaks, Kent. The White Hart is a beautiful old coaching inn which has been serving the needs of travellers for more than 300 years. The walking route follows a circuit around the adjacent Knole Park, a 400 year old deer park. The beautiful landscaped grounds make for easy walking with great views and plenty to see including wildlife, veteran trees and long ancient avenues. The walk has a few gentle gradients throughout and the paths are a mixture of tarmac drives/pavements plus grassy rides within the park, which tend to be pretty firm all year round. There are two kissing gates and no stiles. There is one short section of road walking so take care of any traffic at this point. Dogs are welcome in Knole Park but must be kept on a lead as the park is home to a large herd of fallow deer. Allow 1.5 hours (plus extra time to visit Knole House if you wish. Note: entrance fees apply for the house and formal gardens and dogs are not allowed in this part).
Nevill Crest and Gun and Broadwater Warren Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.099718,0.224338 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Nevill Crest and Gun in Eridge Green, East Sussex. The Nevill Crest and Gun is more than 500 years old and takes its name from the Nevill family, the Earls of Abergavenny, on whose estate the pub was built. The walking route follows a loop through the two adjoining nature reserves – Eridge Rocks and Broadwater Warren. The woodland walk is really beautiful with mixed woodland, sandstone outcrops and open heath being home to a wide range of birds, dormice and Exmoor ponies. The route has several climbs and descents throughout and the woodland and heath paths can get very muddy in winter and after wet weather so good boots are recommended. There are no stiles and three kissing gates to negotiate. Dogs are welcome in the nature reserves but must be kept on leads in some parts and kept to the paths in the remaining areas. The open heath is grazed by Exmoor ponies. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Two Brewers and Hainault Forest Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.621974,0.120638 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Two Brewers in Chigwell Row, Essex. The Two Brewers is a lovely spacious pub with comfortable furniture and a well-stocked bar. The walking route explores the adjacent Hainault Forest Country Park, with chance to see beautiful ancient woodland, a pretty lake and even a city farm and zoo. The walk is relatively flat with just a couple of gentle slopes. Most of the paths are well-made but the first section through the forest can get fairly muddy after periods of rain and in winter. There are no stiles and just a few kissing gates. Dogs are welcome in the country park. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
The Old Windmill and South Hanningfield Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.649673,0.514692 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Old Windmill in South Hanningfield, Essex. The Old Windmill has been serving food and ale since 1799 and today, with a beautiful sympathetic refurbishment, it really is a gem of a pub. The walking route explores the local countryside, a peaceful journey through arable fields and ancient lanes, visiting the pretty local church on route. The paths follow sections of arable fields and grass meadows, all of which can be very muddy in the winter and after periods of rain, so the walk is one best enjoyed in the warmer months. The paths in a couple of places can also be a little overgrown so good stout footwear and full length trousers are recommended (unless you're immune to nettles!). The route has several climbs and descents throughout and there are a couple of sections of road walking so take care of traffic. There are a few gates plus six stiles, some of which are fully enclosed with wire fencing so dogs may need a lift over. Depending on the condition underfoot, allow 1 to 2 hours.
The George and Dragon Stour Valley and Canterbury Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.295309,1.124784 A 6 mile (can be shorted to 3 miles) circular pub walk from the George and Dragon in Fordwich, Kent. The George and Dragon is a beautiful 15th century pub which was the film set for the ‘Hand of Glory' pub in the 1944 film, A Canterbury Tale. The walking route explores the adjacent Stour Valley with the chance to enjoy the pretty River Stour and extensive views from the woodland and open range paths. The full route also includes an additional stretch into the city of Canterbury where you'll have chance to see the famous cathedral and the city's other historical sites (if this optional arm to Canterbury is excluded the walk is reduced to just 3 miles). There are several gradients throughout the walk and, whilst the first half of the route follows a solid cycle path, the second half follows grass and dirt paths, parts of which can be quite muddy in the winter and after periods of rain. There are five stiles on route, four of which are on the optional stretch to Canterbury and all of which have open fencing which should allow medium-large dogs to pass through. You will also need to cross two cattle grids (again with gaps alongside suitable for dogs). Allow 2.5 to 3 hours for the full walk (plus extra time to explore Canterbury and its attractions) or 1.5 hours for the shorter walk.
The Hare and Groombridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.131012,0.204009 A 4 mile circular pub walk from The Hare in Langton Green, near Tunbridge Wells in Kent. The site of the Hare has been home to a pub since 1785, the present building dating back to 1901, and it is a beautiful spot in the centre of Langton Green. The walking route is fairly strenuous but well worth the effort with lovely views, peaceful stretches of ancient tracks and a visit to Groombridge Place, a stunning moated manor house which is now home to a surprising range of animals. There are a number of climbs and descents throughout the route and, whilst most of the path surfaces are well made, they can get muddy in places. Some of the paths are quite narrow and can be a little overgrown in late summer. You will need to negotiate a number of kissing gates, some steps plus nine stiles (some with dedicated dog gates but one which dogs may need a lift over). You are likely to come across cattle grazing in some of the fields so take care with dogs. One of the fields may also be holding some of the menage of animals from the Groomfield Place estate (such as an alpaca or zedonk!). Allow 2 to 2.5 hours.
Boxley and the North Downs Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.302395,0.543099 A 4.5 mile circular walk from the pretty village of Boxley near Maidstone in Kent. The route visits the nearby Boxley Abbey then climbs to the top of the North Downs for a long stretch before descending back to the village. There is plenty of wildlife to enjoy plus an atmospheric woodland of ancient yews and some beautiful views. The route includes several climbs and descents throughout including one fairly steep climb up to the top of the downs, and an equivalent descent. The surfaces are a mixture of field and woodland paths which can get fairly muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There is one section of road walking so take care of any traffic. There are a few gates plus four stiles on route, the final one of which is enclosed and quite tall so dogs may need a lift over (although there is a stone wall at the side that they could jump onto). One of the fields is likely to be holding horses and another holding sheep so take care with dogs. Allow 2 to 2.5 hours.
Lincolnshire Wolds: Romans and Vikings Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.241402,-0.056071 If you thought Lincolnshire was flat, this walk may make you change your mind. Not that there's a lot of hilly walking, just enough to change perceptions! A decent length circular track, this walk starts in Fulletby, the second highest village in the Lincolnshire Wolds, and takes you through two further typical Wolds villages, using a combination of footpaths and quiet roads. The route takes in part of a Roman salt road, a path used to carry salt from the coast to Lincoln, and a section of the long distance Viking Way. There are a number of good view points along the way, as well as water and chances for wildlife-spotting. There are pubs in Tetford and Belchford, but check opening times before setting out. Overall, allow around three hours to complete, excluding any picnic or bird spotting stops.
Covenham Reservoir and Louth Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.45437,-0.00244 This steady circular walk takes in two expanses of water: the Covenham Reservoir, the largest stretch of inland water in Lincolnshire, and a section of the old Louth Canal, a twelve mile inland waterway dug to connect Louth to the Humber, south of Grimsby. It starts in the village of Fulstow, which sits on the meridian and has a pub, the Cross Keys. The walk is relatively flat and easy, but you should allow the best part of three hours to complete it. Bring binoculars for bird-spotting on the water, and a picnic and water if you are walking in the middle of the day. This is a difficult walk to get wrong - just follow the signposts with a boat icon.
Snowdon Watkin Path Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.0354587454349,-4.04803276062012 A 6 mile route, up Snowdon and back, to reach a ridge high in the mountain, following the Watkin Path. The route does not climb all the way to the summit, and so avoids the dangerous sharp scree slope that the final stages of the Watkin Path are known for. At the top ridge you'll have great views across the two lakes, Glaslyn and Llyn Llydaw, before you begin your descent back down. Allow 4 hours.
Gomshall Mill and Netley Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.219604,-0.447356 A 3 mile circular pub walk from Gomshall Mill in Gomshall, Surrey. Gomshall Mill is a timber-framed mill dating back to Medieval times and has been lovingly converted to a wonderfully atmospheric pub. The walking route follows an old lane to the adjacent village of Shere before climbing high into the North Downs to explore Netley Park, an old estate now managed by the National Trust. There's plenty of wildlife to enjoy along the way plus spectacular views once you're up on the North Downs. The walk follows a mixture of pavements plus woodland tracks, the latter of which are very uneven and can get fairly muddy after rain/in winter so good waterproof boots are recommended. There is one fairly steep, long and strenuous climb into the North Downs plus an equivalent descent, but the paths are all reasonably wide and there are no gates or stiles to negotiate (just a handful of steps). Approximate time 1.5 hours.
The Cross Foxes and River Dee Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.977995,-2.963362 A 5.5 mile circular pub walk from the Cross Foxes in Erbistock, near Wrexham. The Cross Foxes is a wonderful pub sitting high on the banks overlooking the River Dee. The walking route heads east over pastures and through woodland to reach the nearby village of Overton, before returning along the banks of the beautiful River Dee. A lovely walk with chance to explore the classic farmland of this part of North Wales, plus the picturesque, peaceful, meandering River Dee. The walk follows a mixture of field and woodland paths alongside the River Dee, all of which can get very muddy so good waterproof boots are a must (along with a change of shoes for the pub!). If the River Dee is in flood (after periods of heavy rain) some of the paths can be flooded so do not attempt the walk at these times. There are several climbs and descents throughout and you will need to negotiate several gates plus seven stiles. Many of the fields are likely to be holding dairy cattle and these showed some aggression towards our dog, so this isn't a walk we'd recommend for dog walkers unless you are very confident around cattle. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
The Old Hall Sandbach Town Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.142756,-2.360496 A 2 mile circular pub walk from the Old Hall in Sandbach, Cheshire. The Old Hall is a marvellous Grade I listed building which was the residence of the Lords of the Manor of Sandbach, now lovingly converted to an excellent pub. The walking route explores the town of Sandbach with its many historic buildings, a beautiful park, the ancient market square and pretty old lanes. The walk has just a few gentle slopes and follows a mixture of tarmac paths/pavements plus some grass/dirt paths and tracks. The latter can be quite soft underfoot after rain so sensible shoes are a must. There is one small flight of steps to negotiate plus a handful of kissing gates but these are oversized so it would be possible to get a rugged pushchair round if it isn't too muddy underfoot. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
The Hand and Trumpet and Betley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.023577,-2.369161 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Hand and Trumpet in Wrinehill, Staffordshire. The Hand and Trumpet is a true classic with old floors, rugs, open fires, old furniture and a sizeable garden with a great deck. The walking route performs a simple circuit around the surrounding pretty, undulating countryside crossing a range of fields and pastures and passing through the neighbouring village of Betley. The walk includes several steady climbs and descents and almost all of the paths are across fields – crop fields, water meadows and pastures – which can get very muddy so good waterproof boots are a must (along with a change of shoes for the pub!). There are a few gates plus 19 stiles to negotiate (including several fully enclosed stiles and one ladder stile that dogs may need a lift over). You are likely to come across horses, sheep and cattle grazing in the various fields so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Dysart Arms and Bunbury Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.118509,-2.646006 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Dysart Arms in Bunbury, Cheshire. The Dysart Arms is a classic English village pub with lovely open fires, lots of old oak and a really pleasant garden. The walking route performs a simple loop around the surrounding countryside with chance to visit the nearby Bunbury Mill, an old watermill, and lots of peaceful stretches through the local fields and pastures. The walk is relatively flat with just a few gentle inclines. The paths are almost all across grass pastures and these can get very muddy after rain so good waterproof boots are a must (along with a change of shoes for the pub!). You will need to negotiate a number of kissing gates plus 11 stiles, some of which are very tall (so may pose a challenge for less able people), and enclosed (so dogs may need a lift over). The large fields you cross are likely to be holding cattle, sheep and horses so take care with dogs. Bunbury Mill is only working on Sunday afternoons in the summer months, so time your walk accordingly if you want to see the mill in action. Allow 1.5 hours.
The Combermere Arms and Burleydam Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.980936,-2.590848 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Combermere Arms in Burleydam, Cheshire. The Combermere Arms is a classic Cheshire country inn with plenty of nooks and crannies and lots of character. The walking route performs a simple loop through the surrounding countryside, taking in the peaceful setting of the farming landscape. The walk has just a few gentle climbs and descents throughout. The route follows a mix of quiet lanes and field paths, the latter of which can be quite muddy and uneven underfoot so good waterproof boots are a must. There are a couple of sections of road walking. The sections are relatively short but the traffic can be quick so stay on the grass verges and be aware of oncoming vehicles. There are several kissing gates along the way, but no stiles. Whilst some of the fields are arable crop fields, three of the fields are grazing pastures for cattle so take care with dogs (we also came across a couple of friendly pet pigs in one field). Allow 1.5 hours.
Pant-yr-Ochain and Gresford Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.073547,-2.97806 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Pant-yr-Ochain in Gresford, Wrexham. The Pant is a picture-postcard manor house with a long sweeping drive and majestic trees, overlooking a small lake surrounded by hills and hollows. The walking route performs a simple loop, following a quiet lane up to the centre of the village and then joining a path through open fields giving lovely views across the surrounding hills. The walk has just a few gentle climbs and descents. The paths are generally firm but can get muddy in winter and after prolonged rain. Some of the paths are quite narrow and can be a little overgrown so shorts are not recommended (unless you're immune to nettles!). Towards the end of the walk, the route crosses a dual carriageway. At some times of day this road can be very busy so, if you have the legs for it, it will be safer to retrace your steps the way you came (making your walk 5.5 miles in total). There are also a couple of sections of road walking so take care of traffic at these points. There is one stile (with a dog-sized gap alongside) on route plus a number of very tight kissing gates – be prepared to breathe in! There was no livestock on route when we walked but the grassy slopes have been used to graze sheep in the past, so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Old Harkers Arms and Chester City Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.193378,-2.880988 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Old Harkers Arms in Chester, Cheshire. The Old Harkers Arms is a proper old city of London boozer, only in Chester, that is set close to the commercial and professional heart of the city. The walking route follows a trail exploring some of the highlights that the city offers – the canal towpath, the old city walls, the famous racecourse, the River Dee and several of Chester's beautiful parks. The walk follows solid well-made paths and there are just a couple of inclines on route. There are no gates or stiles to negotiate, just a few flights of steps. Approximate time 2 hours.
The Architect and River Dee (Chester Race Days Version) Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.187389,-2.89527 NOTE: There are two versions of this walk on iFootpath. This one is for use when Chester Races are running as it avoids the section of the riverside promenade that is closed to the public during racing (see http://www.chester-races.co.uk to find out the date of fixtures). A 6 mile circular walk from the Architect in Chester, Cheshire. The Architect is a classic pub restaurant within Chester's city walls overlooking the racecourse at Roodee. The walking route has real variety with something for everyone: the bustling city streets, quiet suburban residential lanes, modern commercial estates, a section of the ancient city walls and very long peaceful stretches of paths alongside the River Dee. The walk is relatively flat and follows mostly well-made surfaces. There are just a couple of short stretches which follow grass bank paths which can get a bit muddy after rain and in winter. There are no stiles or gates on route, just a few flights of steps and staggered barriers. You will be sharing the riverside paths with cyclists so take care with children and dogs. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Stourbridge, Whittington and Ismere Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.450229,-2.15087 This is a 7 mile circular walk that starts at Mary Stevens Park in Stourbridge, goes through a suburban area to public footpaths and bridleways through Whittington and Ismere before returning, via Norton, to the start point.The walk encompasses several woodland and field tracks, and offers views of the countryside of the local area that are not available from other vantage points. Most of the fields are free from animals. The walk has several stiles and gates to navigate, and some parts are likely to be muddy in wet weather. Parts of the route take place on pavement in a suburban area, but in the main it follows dirt tracks. There are a couple of reasonable gradients, but nothing too strenuous. There are toilets available at the start of the walk, in the park. There are also shops nearby in Stourbridge town centre.
The Architect and River Dee (Non-Chester Race Days Version) Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.187389,-2.89527 NOTE: There are two versions of this walk on iFootpath. This one is for use when Chester Races are NOT running (see http://www.chester-races.co.uk to find out the date of fixtures) as it includes the section of the riverside promenade that is closed to the public during racing. A 6 mile circular walk from the Architect in Chester, Cheshire. The Architect is a classic pub restaurant within Chester's city walls overlooking the racecourse at Roodee. The walking route has real variety with something for everyone: the bustling city streets, quiet suburban residential lanes, modern commercial estates, a section of the ancient city walls and very long peaceful stretches of paths alongside the River Dee. The walk is relatively flat and follows mostly well-made surfaces. There are just a couple of short stretches which follow grass bank paths which can get a bit muddy after rain and in winter. There are no stiles or gates on route, just a few flights of steps and staggered barriers. You will be sharing the riverside paths with cyclists so take care with children and dogs. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Glasfryn and Gwysaney Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.178297,-3.13878 A 5 mile circular pub walk from Glasfryn in Mold, Flintshire. Glasfryn is a great Arts and Crafts pub which attracts plenty of locals and visitors and has stunning views from its sunny terrace. The walking route climbs high into the surrounding hills, passing through the beautiful Gwysaney Estate before descending into the nearby village of Soughton and on back to the pub. It's a really rewarding walk taking you through classic Welsh hillsides and valleys. There are several climbs and descents throughout and the route follows a mixture of stone tracks and grass field/woodland paths, the latter of which can get quite muddy so good waterproof boots are a must. There are a couple of sections of road walking so take care of any traffic. There are several kissing gates plus 7 stiles to negotiate and some of the stiles are enclosed with wire fencing so dogs may need a lift over. Some of the fields are likely to be holding sheep and horses so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
The Grosvenor Arms and Aldford Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.127626,-2.865873 A 2.5 mile (extendable along a riverside path) circular pub walk from the Grosvenor Arms in Aldford, Cheshire. The Grosvenor Arms is a charming pub with well-spaced rooms and a great outside terrace leading into a small but very pleasing garden. From the outside it appears a rather austere Victorian governess of a building, but once inside it's very welcoming. The walking route explores the village of Aldford and follows a lovely peaceful stretch of the River Dee, visiting the impressive local iron bridge on route. Aldford is an immaculately kept 19th century model estate village with a church, village hall, post office and the remains of a Norman motte and bailey castle. The walk is almost entirely flat and there are a few kissing gates/gates but no stiles. The riverside path is uneven and can get muddy/overgrown so robust footwear and long trousers are recommended. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
The Corn Mill and Pen-y-Coed Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.970764,-3.171032 A 2.5 mile, fairly strenuous, circular pub walk from the Corn Mill in Llangollen, Denbighshire. The Corn Mill, as the name suggests, is a converted mill which sits over the mill race and rapids on the banks of the River Dee. The interior is really beautiful with a great jumble of old beams everywhere, and the water wheel turning slowly behind the bar. The walking route climbs up to explore Pen-y-Coed, a woodland which occupies a prominent steep-sided ridge on the eastern side of Llangollen. The walk has long and steep climbs and descents throughout. The path surfaces, particularly on the eastern side of the woodland, are loose and shaley and can be slippery in both wet and dry conditions. There are a number of kissing gates on route, plus two stiles (both of which have large gaps alongside for dogs). You will cross one hillside field that may be holding horses. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Friston Loop Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.190113,1.529153 An easy 3.5 mile walk through the farmland and woodland around Friston, Suffolk. There are no stiles to negotiate and the paths are all unmade so can be quite muddy after wet weather.
Pen-y-Bryn and Bryn Euryn Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.288434,-3.738828 A 5 mile (can be shortened to 3 miles or 1 mile) fairly strenuous walk from the Pen-y-Bryn in Upper Colwyn Bay, Conwy. The Pen-y-Bryn is a lovely pub with a stunning garden and terrace, and garden windows with panoramic views out over the sea and the Great Orme. The full walking route follows the steep valley sides down towards Rhos-on-Sea to visit the nature reserve, Bryn Euryn, climbing to the hill's summit, before returning back up the valley side to the pub. Approximate time 3 to 3.5 hours. If this is too strenuous for you there are two shorter/easier options. The first option is to perform the first half of the walk and then request a taxi back to the pub, saving the climb back up the valley slopes, reducing the walk to 3 miles (about 2 hours). The second option is to drive to the Bryn Euryn car park and just complete the middle 1 mile section of the route around Bryn Euryn, and then drive back to the pub for your refreshments (about 1 hour). The choice is yours. Bryn Euryn is a prominent limestone hill overlooking Rhos on Sea, with fine views from the summit. It is a rich mixture of grassland and woodland where you'll have chance to enjoy beautiful butterflies, fabulous flowers, a historical hill fort and a magnificent ruined mansion. All three options of the walk have fairly steep climbs and descents (including some flights of steps) which can be slippery after rain, so you will need stout footwear. There is one kissing gate within Bryn Euryn. The two longer options include a further two kissing gates (which are very tight – be prepared to breath in!), a ladder stile and one of the fields is likely to be holding cattle.
The Dabbling Duck Shere and Peaslake Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.21995,-0.464638 A 7.5 mile circular walk from the Dabbling Duck cafe in Shere, Surrey. The Dabbling Duck is a great place to meet up for breakfast, morning coffee, lunch or afternoon tea. The welcome is warm and the food is a treat. The walking route follows long stretches of beautiful ancient lanes which criss-cross this area of the Surrey Hills. You'll pass through sections of heath and woodland with the opportunity to see plenty of wildlife and enjoy views across the landscape. The walk has many fairly gentle climbs and descents throughout plus just a couple of short, more challenging gradients. The vast majority of the route follows ancient lanes which are fairly wide, but are rocky and uneven, and can be muddy in winter. There are no stiles on route, just a handful of gates including one kissing gate. You will need to cross the rail line at one point, using an un-signalled crossing, so take particular care here, especially with children and dogs. Allow 3 to 4 hours.
The Bolney Stage and Wykehurst Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.000496,-0.198705 A 5 mile circular pub walk from the Bolney Stage in Bolney, West Sussex. The Bolney Stage dates from about 1500 and oozes character with inglenook fireplaces, ancient flagstones and crooked beams. The walking route explores the beautiful surrounding hills and valleys, with amazing views and plenty of wildlife. There's something for everyone on this varied route, from woodlands to parkland, sheep pastures to smallholdings and even a vineyard. The route has several climbs and descents throughout. The paths are unmade for the most part and can get quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain so good waterproof boots are recommended. There are a couple of sections of road walking along quiet lanes so take care of any traffic on these parts. You will need to negotiate several gates plus seven stiles (all of which have either adjacent dog gates or open fencing alongside). Whilst the vast majority of the paths are fenced, you will cross a couple of pastures which are likely to be holding sheep so take care with dogs. The first (and last) sections of path can be a little overgrown – but persevere, it is only a few hundred yards. Approximate time 2 to 3 hours.
The Cricketers and Chess Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.682401,-0.491802 A 5 mile circular pub walk from the Cricketers in Sarratt, Hertfordshire. The Cricketers overlooks the green in the village of Sarratt and is a great place to sit with a pint on a sunny day, watching the world roll by. The walking route takes in the surrounding classic Chiltern Hills, with peaceful rolling hills and valleys, the pretty River Chess, water meadows and plenty of wildlife to enjoy. The route includes several climbs and descents throughout. The paths cross fields and woodlands and so can be quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain so robust footwear is recommended (plus a change of shoes for the pub!). Several of the fields are likely to be holding cattle or horses so take care with dogs. You will need to negotiate several gates/kissing gates plus 3 stiles (all of which have open fencing at the side that most dogs should be able to negotiate). Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
The Woodbridge Inn and Ironbridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.614906,-2.441658 A 5 mile circular pub walk from the Woodbridge Inn in Coalport, Shropshire. (A 2 mile version of this walk, The Woodbridge Inn and Coalport, is also available on iFootpath). The Woodbridge Inn is situated on the banks of the River Severn with a raised outside terrace and a sunny garden room both giving great views across the river. The walking route follows an old railway line through the supposed birthplace of the Industrial Revolution all the way to Ironbridge, crossing the famous Iron Bridge which dates from 1779. The return leg follows the gorge lane back through Coalport and then joins a section of the Silkin Way path for the final stretch. There are opportunities to visit some of the popular visitor attractions within the Ironbridge Gorge, including the Coalport China Museum, the Jackfield Tile Museum and the Iron Bridge Toll House. The walking route is relatively flat, with just a couple of short (but fairly steep) slopes. There are no stiles, just a couple of gates and a short flight of steps. The paths are a mixture of tarmac pavements, quiet lanes and a stone/gravel old railway line. The area is surrounded by woodland so leaf drop can make the paths a little muddy in winter but the mud is never deep. The return leg follows a long stretch of a narrow pavement alongside a fairly busy road. At a couple of points the narrow pavement disappears completely to accommodate properties which sit directly on the road, so take care of traffic here. If you would rather avoid the long stretch of pavement walking, you can simply retrace your steps from the outward leg instead. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours, plus extra time to visit any attractions.
The Inn at Shipley and Ludstone Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.559758,-2.284772 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the Inn at Shipley in Shipley, Shropshire. The Inn at Shipley was opened in December 2013 and is an impressive red brick building with lovely beams and plenty of nooks and crannies inside. The walking route explores the surrounding lanes and farmland, passing the beautiful early 17th century Ludstone Hall along the way. The route includes a few gentle climbs and descents throughout. The first 100 yards of the walk passes down a farm track which is part of a dairy farm and so can be very muddy at any time of the year – good waterproof boots are a must. The paths are not particularly well-walked and so can be a little overgrown in the summer. There are a few sections of road walking and you will need to cross a couple of busy road junctions so take care of traffic at these points. You will need to negotiate four stiles which are very tall and could prove difficult for the less agile! There are gaps alongside the stiles which should be suitable for most dogs to pass through. One field you cross may be holding cattle so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Fox and Woodcote Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.748652,-2.35991 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Fox in Chetwynd Aston, Shropshire. The Fox is a lovely big Edwardian-style pub all wrapped around a busy bar, with a large south-facing terrace to enjoy in the summer months. The walking route explores the surrounding gently rolling countryside following tracks and paths through arable farmland and woodland, a peaceful journey with lovely views throughout. The walk has several gentle climbs and descents and there are no stiles on route, just one single gate. The paths are wide and well-made for the most part, but a few sections pass along the edge of fields and these paths can be quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain so good boots are recommended. The footpaths are not particularly well signed, so be sure to follow the directions carefully to ensure you stay on the public rights of way. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Woodbridge Inn and Coalport Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.614906,-2.441658 A 2 mile circular pub walk from the Woodbridge Inn in Coalport, Shropshire. (A 5 mile version of this walk, The Woodbridge Inn and Ironbridge, is also available on iFootpath). The Woodbridge Inn is situated on the banks of the River Severn with a raised outside terrace and a sunny garden room both giving great views across the river. The walking route follows an old railway line along the southern banks of the River Severn before crossing into Coalport to join a section of the Silkin Way path for the final stretch. There is an opportunity to visit the Coalport China Museum should you wish. The walking route is relatively flat, with just a couple of short (but fairly steep) slopes. There are no stiles, just a couple of gates and a short flight of steps. The paths are a mixture of tarmac pavements, quiet lanes and a stone/gravel old railway line. The area is surrounded by woodland so leaf drop can make the paths a little muddy in winter but the mud is never deep. Approximate time 1 hour, plus extra time to visit any attractions.
The Armoury Shrewsbury Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.709644,-2.758958 A 4.5 mile circular pub walk from the Armoury in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. The Armoury sits in a magnificent brick building overlooking the River Severn and has an eclectic history of use including being (unsurprisingly!) an armoury, a convalescence home, a bakery and now a great town pub. The walking route explores some of the highlights within the historic market town of Shrewsbury, with something for everyone. You will be able to enjoy long stretches of the banks of the River Severn, the formal avenues within Quarry Park, the c 1070 red sandstone Shrewsbury Castle, the central shopping area and several beautiful historic buildings. The route follows pavements and tarmac paths in the main, but the first section through Poplar Island follows a grass path and this can get quite muddy in winter and after rain. If you don't have suitable footwear, this muddy section can be excluded and the walk shortened to 3 miles (simply follow the notes within the route description). The walk has a few gentle slopes throughout and includes a number of gates/kissing gates and some flights of steps, but no stiles. Allow 2 to 2.5 hours.
The Dabbling Duck Shere and Albury Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.219975,-0.46447 A 5 mile circular walk from the Dabbling Duck cafe in Shere, Surrey. The Dabbling Duck is a great place to meet up for breakfast, morning coffee, lunch or afternoon tea. The welcome is warm and the food is a treat. The walking route explores large sections of the adjacent Albury Estate taking in pastures, woodland, Albury village, heathland and the formal park with chance to enjoy great views across the rolling hills. The route includes several climbs and descents throughout. Whilst most of the paths are generally firm, some sections can get quite muddy after periods of rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates plus two stiles (both of which have gaps in the fencing alongside, which should be suitable for most dogs to squeeze through). Two of the pastures you cross are likely to be holding cattle so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Dabbling Duck Shere Village Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.219753,-0.464716 A 1.5 mile circular walk from the Dabbling Duck cafe in Shere, Surrey. The Dabbling Duck is a great place to meet up for breakfast, morning coffee, lunch or afternoon tea. The welcome is warm and the food is a treat. The walking route explores the beautiful village of Shere giving you an opportunity to appreciate what makes the village such a sought after residential location and such an attraction for tourists and visitors. Along the way you'll be able to enjoy the many historic cottages, the river and ford, the pretty shops and ancient church plus learn more about the history that has shaped the village. The walk follows mainly well-made stone and tarmac paths and pavements. One short section by the ford can be a little softer underfoot but this can be excluded from the walk if necessary. There are a few gentle climbs and descents. The pavements can be quite narrow in places (so take care with children and dogs) and you will need to negotiate two kissing gates and a few single gates (the kissing gates can also be excluded if necessary). Allow 30 to 60 minutes.
Ducks and Hens: The Shere and Shamley Green Cafe Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.219957,-0.464633 A 5.5 mile linear walk from the Dabbling Duck Cafe in Shere to the Speckledy Hen Cafe in Shamley Green, Surrey. At these two sister cafes the welcome is warm and the food is a treat. If you time your walk correctly you'll be able to have breakfast in Shere and then lunch in Shamley Green – a perfect day out. The walking route follows a lovely journey through the Albury Park Estate and Blackheath Forest, a large area of lowland heath and pine forest which is home to a wide range of wildlife. NOTE: As this is a linear walk you will need to use two cars or arrange to travel by public transport – see the Getting There section for details. Whilst the Dabbling Duck is open seven days a week, the Speckledy Hen cafe is open Monday to Saturdays so you will need to make separate lunch arrangements on Sundays. The route has several climbs and descents throughout. The paths through the heath, whilst firm for the most part, can get very muddy in the lower/shaded paths and bridleways so good boots are a must. There are several kissing gates to negotiate but no stiles. You are likely to come across several horse riders using the bridleways so take care with dogs. The paths within the heath/forest can be confusing so pay particular attention to the instructions (and we recommend using the live map via the App where possible). Allow 2.5 to 3 hours (plus extra time for the transport connections).
The Black Jug and Warnham Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.06396,-0.324185 A 6.5 mile circular walk from the Black Jug in Horsham, West Sussex. The Black Jug is a great town pub centred around a large bar with wooden panelling, old furniture, bookcases and an airy enclosed courtyard. The walking route heads out through Horsham Park and the Warnham Court Estate to reach the nearby village of Warnham, before returning via arable farmland and ancient lanes. You'll have chance to see the impressive herd of red deer within Warnham Park, the 14th century church in Warnham plus plenty of wildlife along the way. The walk has several steady climbs and descents. The paths across the parkland and woodland can all get fairly muddy in winter an after periods of rain. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates plus 3 stiles. The stiles have wire fencing surrounds about a foot high, but most dogs should be able to hop over these. You will need to cross over a golf course so take care of any stray flying golf balls and allow the golfers to play their shots before you cross. You will also need to cross a dual carriageway at a designated (but unsignalled) crossing point so take particular care here. There are a couple of sections of road walking along country lanes so beware of any passing traffic. The walk passes through a deer park and a deer farm so take care around the deer with children and dogs. (The deer can become aggressive towards dogs during the rutting season from late September to early November and in May/June when there are young calves around). Allow 2.5 to 3 hours.
The Refectory and Milford Common Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.172121,-0.638945 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Refectory in Milford near Godalming in Surrey. The Refectory was originally a cattle barn but is now a wonderful pub full of ancient wooden beams and stained glass. There are open fires to keep you warm in the winter and a lovely sunny terrace to enjoy in the warmer months. The walking route heads out through the village of Milford to explore the nearby open spaces of Moushill Common and Milford Common before returning along residential roads. The walk is relatively flat with just a couple of gentle slopes. There are no gates, stiles or steps to negotiate. The route follows a mixture of tarmac pavements, quiet wide made-up lanes and tracks and some narrower sandy paths within the commons. All of these paths are fairly firm although the common paths can get a bit muddy in the winter and after periods of rain. (Some areas of the common are grazed by Highland Cattle for conservation for parts of the year so take care with dogs if you see signs of this). Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Mute Swan and Bushy Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.404633,-0.342157 A 5 mile circular pub walk (can be shortened to 3.5 miles) from the Mute Swan at Hampton Court. The Mute Swan is beautifully located for lunch with family, friends or work colleagues, or a relaxing drink and a bite of supper after a busy day's exploring. The walking route follows a loop through the adjacent Bushy Park, the second largest of London's Royal Parks. Enjoy the long tree-lined avenues, open parkland and the more formal water gardens plus meet the herds of fallow and red deer that roam freely within the park. The walk is almost entirely flat and there are no stiles or steps to negotiate, just one kissing gate (which can be avoided by using the adjacent vehicle gate) and a couple of gates into the water gardens. The paths are a mixture of tarmac and sand/stone surfaced path plus one section along a wide grass track. All the paths stay quite firm for most of the year. The park is open during daylight hours. The water gardens (which can be excluded from the walk if necessary) are closed on Mondays (except Bank Holiday weeks when they are open on Monday and closed on Tuesday). The park has free roaming red and fallow deer so take care with children and keep dogs under close control. The deer can become aggressive towards dogs in the rutting (Sep and Oct) and birthing (May to July) seasons, so the park authority recommend not taking dogs into the park at these times for your own safety. Allow 2 to 2.5 hours.
Lochan Spling Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 56.175827,-4.417716 A circular scenic trail to a picturesque little loch that teems with wildlife – including a rather unusual fish! The trail climbs gently through mixed woodland to loop around Lochan Spling. Watch out for jays and crossbills in the trees, damselflies near the loch and wildlife sculptures along the way, including a wonderful wiry osprey. Not all the fish in the loch are as big as the pike that's permanently leaping in the shallows!
Little Manor and Bridgewater Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.382308,-2.524106 A 3.5 mile circular pub walk from the Little Manor in Thelwall, Cheshire. The Little Manor was built in 1660 and still exudes lots of original character. The walking route makes use of two adjacent long-distance trails. The outward leg follows a disused railway line which today is part of the Trans Pennine Trail, while the return leg follows the towpath alongside the Bridgewater Canal, part of the Cheshire Ring Canal Walk. The route is easy to follow and gives opportunity to enjoy the surrounding quiet rural countryside plus the bird and boat life along the canal. The route is almost entirely flat. The disused railway line is a wide, stone-surfaced track making for easy walking. The return leg follows the grass/mud canal towpath which is much narrower and can be a bit soft in places, so if you have a pushchair with you, you may prefer to re-trace your steps back along the old railway instead. The path which joins the railway and canal sections includes a short flight of steps, a kissing gate and a squeeze gap. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Sutton Hall and Macclesfield Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.241009,-2.113326 A 4 mile circular pub walk from Sutton Hall in Sutton, near Macclesfield in Cheshire. Sutton Hall is a 480 year old manor house now converted into a proper pub with a friendly and unpretentious atmosphere and a warren of dining areas. The walking route heads out across farmland to reach the nearby Sutton Reservoir before returning along the towpath of the Macclesfield Canal. You'll be able to enjoy the peace of the rural landscape and the laid back feel of the canal, all with the stunning back drop of the nearby Peak District hills. The walk has a few gentle gradients throughout plus one short steeper slope. The outward leg crosses farm pastures which can be very muddy so good boots are a must. The pastures are likely to be holding cattle (and maybe sheep) so take care with dogs. There are 2 stiles, several gates and some flights of steps to negotiate along the route (the stiles do have wire fence surrounds, although there was a gap big enough for our standard poodle to squeeze through). The canal towpath can be narrow in places so take care to keep children away from the water's edge. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Bull's Head and Mottram St Andrew Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.303178,-2.180464 A 1.5 mile circular pub walk from the Bull's Head in Mottram St Andrew in Cheshire. The Bull's Head is a traditional country pub with a central bar surrounded by a series of dining areas. The walking route performs a simple short loop around the local countryside, taking in quiet lanes, horse paddocks and rural footpaths. The route includes several gentle climbs and descents throughout. The paths pass through fields and horse paddocks which can be very muddy so good waterproof boots are a must. Each paddock is likely to be holding several horses so take care with dogs. You will need to negotiate 11 stiles, a kissing gate and a flight of steps. Some of the stiles are enclosed with wire fencing so dogs may need a lift over. Approximate time 45 to 60 minutes.
Formby Red Squirrel Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.56553,-3.08882 A 2 mile circular walk around the National Trust's Nature Reserve at Formby. There is plenty on offer here including dramatic sand dunes, sweeping coastal pines and mixed woodland plus a rare and healthy population of the native red squirrel. Early mornings in spring and autumn are the best times to see the squirrels. The route follows stone and mud paths through the woodland and dunes and, whilst generally firm, they can get a little muddy in winter and after rain. There are a few slopes throughout. There are no stiles or gates on route. The reserve is open every day (except Christmas Day) from dawn ‘til dusk, but can be extremely busy at peak times so it is better to visit early in the day, on weekdays or in the winter months if you can. Dogs are welcome throughout the reserve, but must be kept under control and need to be on a lead through the red squirrel reserve (the last half mile of the walk). There are public toilets in the car park at the start, plus several picnic areas along the way. Allow 1 hour.
The Sparrowhawk and Ainsdale Nature Reserve Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.584904,-3.040757 A 5.5 mile circular pub walk from the Sparrowhawk in Formby, Merseyside. The Sparrowhawk is a lovely old country house, beautifully converted to a classic pub with open fires to enjoy in the winter and a large terrace for the summer months. The walking route heads out via the Coastal Road to explore two local nature reserves. There's a real mix of landscapes throughout the walk including pine forest, acidic dune heath, a golf course, an airfield, residential streets and long bridleways. If you're lucky you might even get a glimpse of one of the rare red squirrels that populate the reserves. The walk is relatively flat throughout. Most of the paths are wide, well-made tarmac pavements or stone tracks, but one length of bridleway is narrow and can be quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are no stiles on route, just a few gates/kissing gates. You will need to cross the rail line at an un-signalled level crossing so take care to look and listen for trains before you cross. You will also need to take care of traffic at two points: the first is to cross a dual carriageway; the other is the final mile of the walk that follows the edge of a quiet lane. The route crosses a golf course so keep alert and beware of any stray golf balls. Dogs are welcome in the nature reserves, as long as they are kept under control. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
The Wharf Manchester City Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.473486,-2.257051 A 2.5 mile circular pub walk from The Wharf in Castlefield, Manchester. The Wharf is a great city pub with lots of nooks and crannies, open buzzy areas and a really cracking menu. The walking route takes in some of the highlights of Manchester from the old canals and Gothic Revival town hall to the more recent additions such as the Civil Justice Centre. The walk follows the paved towpaths and street pavements in the city. There are no stiles or gates on route, just a few steps. The route is almost entirely flat. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
The Hurtwood and Holmbury Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.177146,-0.429533 A 4 mile circular walk around The Hurtwood, a unique and beautiful world of heath and forest in the heart of the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Hurtwood is a stunning mix of magical pine woods and heaths, ponds and glades, wildlife and wilderness. The walking route climbs to the summit of Holmbury Hill offering stunning views over the Weald to the South Downs, before passing through the pretty village of Holmbury St Mary and returning through the woodland. The route follows forest tracks which can be muddy after periods of wet weather. There are several climbs and descents throughout and some of the paths are narrow and uneven with tree roots. There are no stiles or gates on route, just a few staggered barriers. Dogs are welcome in the Hurtwood. You are likely to be sharing some of the paths with horse riders and mountain bikers. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Hurtwood and Pitch Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.173198,-0.45692 A 4 mile circular walk around The Hurtwood, a unique and beautiful world of heath and forest in the heart of the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Hurtwood is a stunning mix of magical pine woods and heaths, ponds and glades, wildlife and wilderness. The walking route heads north to reach the picturesque village of Peaslake, before returning through the woodland and climbing to the summit of Pitch Hill offering stunning views over the South Downs. The route follows forest tracks which can be muddy after periods of wet weather. There are several climbs and descents throughout and some of the paths are narrow and uneven with tree roots. There are no stiles or gates on route, just a few staggered barriers. Dogs are welcome in the Hurtwood. You are likely to be sharing some of the paths with horse riders and mountain bikers. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
Balcombe and Ardingly Reservoir Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.05573,-0.136538 A 7 mile loop from Balcombe rail station, taking in a long stretch of Ardingly Reservoir (a nature reserve) and the South of England Showground before the mandatory pub stop which will set you up for the return journey through woodlands and lanes. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout, including a couple of quite steep sections. The paths are firm for the most part, but the woodland stretches can be very muddy in winter and some stretches of the bridleway alongside the reservoir are muddy all year round, so good boots are a must. There are a few sections of road walking on quiet lanes so take care of traffic. You will need to negotiate several gates, kissing gates, steps, a footbridge plus 2 stiles (both of which have gaps alongside which should be suitable for most dogs to pass through). Most of the paths are enclosed, but you will need to cross one field that may be holding cattle, so take particular care with dogs. Allow up to 4 hours.
The Hurtwood and Winterfold Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.173601,-0.480372 A 4.5 mile circular walk around The Hurtwood, a unique and beautiful world of heath and forest in the heart of the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Hurtwood is a stunning mix of magical pine woods and heaths, ponds and glades, wildlife and wilderness. The walking route begins on Winterfold Hill, with its stunning views to the south, from where it heads north to follow a beautiful old sunken path before cutting back through the heart of Winterfold Wood. The route follows forest tracks and paths plus a couple of field paths all of which can be very muddy after periods of wet weather, so good waterproof boots are recommended. There are several climbs and descents throughout. Dogs are welcome in the Hurtwood. You are likely to be sharing some of the paths with horse riders and mountain bikers. You will need to negotiate 3 stiles (all of which have open fence surrounds for dogs to pass through), plus a number of gates and a flight of steps. One field which you pass through may be holding horses. Allow 2 to 2.5 hours.
Slindon Park Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.861029,-0.636685 A 3 mile circular walk through Slindon Park, an ancient estate set within the South Downs in West Sussex. The route heads north around the edge of Slindon's Medieval deer park before passing through the unspoilt downland village of Slindon and then returning through woodland. There's something for everyone on this varied walk with woodland flowers in the Spring, plenty of wildlife, ancient beech trees and the charming brick and flint houses of the village itself. The Forge, the community cafe and shop, provides the perfect place for refreshments on route. The route has just a few gentle slopes and the paths are generally well-made, although some of the woodland paths can get very muddy after periods of rain. There are no stiles or gates to negotiate, just a couple of steps and the paths are very uneven in places. One section of the walk follows village roads where there are no pavements, so take care of any traffic at these points. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Slindon and Nore Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.862973,-0.629795 A 4 mile circular walk from the downland village of Slindon in West Sussex. Nestling in the foothills of the South Downs, Slindon is charming and unspoilt, its brick and flint houses surrounded by beech woods, farms and open downland. The walking route heads north through the village to reach Nore Hill, with its beautiful woodland and impressive folly. There are bluebells to enjoy in the Spring, plenty of wildlife and great views out to the south coast. The Forge, the community cafe and shop, provides the perfect place for refreshments before or after your walk. The walk follows a mixture of village pavements and woodland/farm tracks, the latter of which can be quite muddy after periods of rain. The route includes several climbs and descents throughout. There are no stiles or gates to negotiate. A couple of sections follow the edge of quiet roads so take care of any traffic. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Slindon Village History Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.862595,-0.629161 A 1.5 mile circular trail around the charming downland village of Slindon, West Sussex. The walking route follows a journey around the village streets, exploring the varied history from its Elizabethan manor house and churches, to its duck pond and pumpkins, and its links to the game of cricket. The village is simply bursting with interest waiting to be discovered. The Forge, the community cafe and shop, provides the perfect place for refreshments before or after your walk. The walk has a few steady slopes and follows the village pavements and roads. Some sections follow the edge of the village roads (with no pavements) so take care of any traffic, particularly with children. There are no stiles, gates or steps on route. Approximate time 30 to 45 minutes.
Slindon Estate and Stane Street Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.907554,-0.61658 An 8 mile circular walk through the Slindon Estate within the South Downs in West Sussex. The route begins along a stretch of the old Roman Road, Stane Street, plunging you into 2000 years of history as you journey along one of the best remaining examples of a Roman Road in the country. The remainder of the walk loops through the woodland and downland of the estate, taking in the charming village of Slindon along the way. The Forge, the community cafe and shop in Slindon, provides the perfect place for refreshments half way round the route. The walk follows mostly field and woodland paths, many of which can get very muddy after periods of rain so good waterproof boots are recommended. There are several long and steady climbs and descents throughout. Some of the fields you pass through are likely to be holding sheep so take care with dogs. There are several gates on route plus one stile (which has an adjacent dog gate). Some of the quiet village streets have no pavements so take care of any traffic at these points. Approximate time 3.5 to 4 hours.
Firle Beacon and the South Downs Way Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.833537,0.083872 A 4.5 mile circular walk, close to the East Sussex village of Firle. The walk includes a long stretch of the South Downs Way, taking in Firle Beacon and giving you chance to enjoy views for miles around and out to the sea at Eastbourne. After your walk there are plenty of local places to visit, should you wish to make a full day of it. There's Charleston Farmhouse (open April to October), where you'll learn more about the Bloomsbury Group who made this their country home, or Middle Farm (open all year) where you can try some of the national collection of cider and perry. The walk follows grass and mud paths and tracks on the South Downs, some of which at lower levels can get very muddy after periods of wet weather. There is one long and fairly steep descent and an equivalent fairly steep ascent to negotiate. The route includes a few gates but no stiles. You may be sharing some of the paths with livestock, including Exmoor ponies. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
Brentford to Marble Hill House Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.481851,-0.313893 This linear walk goes from the little town of Brentford, where the Brent River meets the Thames, along the Thames Path to Twickenham. It passes Syon House and Marble Hill House with views of Ham House across the river, a reminder of the time when this stretch of the river was home to many grand houses.
The Duke of York and Potters Bar Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.681578,-0.186972 A 5.5 mile circular pub walk from the Duke of York in Barnet, Hertfordshire. A former coaching inn, built on the Great North Road, the Duke of York continues to serve the needs of many a weary traveller. The walking route heads north across fields to explore the nearby settlement of Potters Bar. You'll have chance to see the leafy residential streets, the picturesque golf course and the main commercial streets with a wide range of shops, cafes and businesses. The walk includes several steady climbs and descents throughout. Whilst most of the walk follows pavements through the town, a couple of sections across fields and the golf course can get quite muddy after periods of rain. There is one (slightly wobbly!) stile to negotiate (which has open fencing for dogs to pass through) plus a couple of kissing gates. One of the fields you cross may be holding horses, so take care with dogs. You will also need to cross a golf course so be aware of any flying golf balls and let the golfers take their shots before you cross. There is one short section of walking along the grass verge alongside a fairly busy road, so take care of any traffic here. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
The White Hart and Shave Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.92177,-1.580876 A 5 mile circular pub walk from The White Hart in Cadnam, Hampshire in the New Forest. The White Hart is a traditional country pub with a buzzy, chatty and civilised atmosphere. The walking route heads south through the heart of Shave Wood to reach the nearby village of Minstead where you'll have chance to visit the final resting place of Sherlock Holmes' creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Within the forest, there are also plenty of opportunities to see the beautiful New Forest ponies. The route has several gentle climbs and descents throughout. The paths through the woodland are all unmade and can get quite muddy after periods of rain so waterproof boots are recommended. There are no stiles on route, just a few gates and kissing gates to negotiate. You will be sharing the woodland paths with New Forest ponies so take care with dogs. There are a couple of sections walking along lanes so take care of any traffic. As the New Forest is open access land, there are no signed paths within the woodland meaning navigation can prove quite tricky. As such, it will be easiest to follow this route on the Android or iPhone App, where you can use the live GPS map to guide you. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Moonlight Cottage Cocking and Heyshott Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.950451,-0.751706 A 4 mile circular walk from Moonlight Cottage in Cocking, West Sussex in the heart of the South Downs. Moonlight Cottage is a wonderful B&B (open all year) and tea room (open March to September) offering walkers a perfect base for weekends away or simply some much needed refreshments after a day of walking. The walking route heads north through Hoe Copse to reach the nearby village of Heyshott before returning across the rolling fields. There are lovely views across the patchwork hills of the Downs throughout and lots of wildlife to enjoy in the woodlands. The route has a few steady climbs and descents throughout. In terms of obstacles there are some gates, two stiles (both with open fencing gaps suitable for most dogs), some steps and a couple of narrow footbridges to negotiate. There are also a couple of sections of walking on quiet country/village lanes so take care of any traffic at these points. The walk follows mainly unmade woodland and field paths which, whilst generally firm, can become quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain. You may come across sheep and/or horses in a couple of the fields so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Moonlight Cottage Cocking and South Downs Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.949983,-0.751855 A 4 mile circular walk from Moonlight Cottage in Cocking, West Sussex in the heart of the South Downs. Moonlight Cottage is a wonderful B&B (open all year) and tea room (open March to September) offering walkers a perfect base for weekends away or simply some delicious refreshments after a day of walking. The walking route heads south, climbing steeply to reach the South Downs Way and then follows this ridge-top path west before returning down the ridge and along old farm tracks. There are beautiful views across the surrounding hills and on clear days you'll be able to see as far as Guildford to the north and the coast to the south. The route is basically one long ascent followed by one long descent, a couple of sections being fairly steep. There are no gates or stiles to negotiate. The chalk paths on the climbs/descents can become slippery when wet and the farm tracks can be very muddy in winter and after periods of rain, so good boots are a must. You may come across sheep and cattle grazing the fenced fields adjacent to the South Downs Way so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Saltram House Woodland and Riverside Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.379923,-4.07931 Popular with families and dog walkers, this walk descends gently from the Saltram House National Trust car park, through some woodland to join up with the river, before returning along the riverside to the starting point. The park is open dawn til dusk. The outward leg of the walk is mainly tarmac. The return leg is a mud and stone path - sometimes needing wellies after wet weather. The walk is mostly flat or gentle incline with one slightly steeper section at the end. Dogs must be on leads in the car park area, but once beyond the five bar gate they can be allowed off their leads, only to be put back on again when reaching the five bar gate at the end of the walk. Dog waste bins are provided at regular intervals along the walk.
Moonlight Cottage Cocking and Westdean Woods Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.949678,-0.752355 A 7.5 mile circular walk from Moonlight Cottage in Cocking, West Sussex in the heart of the South Downs. Moonlight Cottage is a wonderful B&B (open all year) and tea room (open March to September) offering walkers a perfect base for weekends away or simply some delicious refreshments after a day of walking. The walking route heads south, climbing steeply to reach the South Downs Way and then follows this ridge-top path west to perform a circuit of Westdean Woods before returning down the ridge and along old farm tracks. There are beautiful views across the surrounding hills throughout the walk and plenty of wildlife within the woodland which is a mixture of majestic pines and coppiced hazel. The route consists of long steady ascents and descents throughout, a couple of sections being fairly steep. There are some gates plus two stiles to negotiate (both stiles have open fencing alongside for dogs). The chalk paths on the climbs/descents can become slippery when wet and the farm tracks can be very muddy in winter and after periods of rain, so good boots are a must. You may come across sheep and cattle grazing the fenced fields adjacent to the South Downs Way so take care with dogs. Approximate time 3 to 3.5 hours.
New River Path Part One: Hertford to Rye House Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.806739,-0.057704 A 5 mile waterside linear walk along the first stretch of the New River in Hertfordshire. This is the most rural and perhaps the most picturesque section of the New River Path with chance to enjoy lots of wildlife plus several of the impressive brick-built pumping stations that continue to operate the river. The New River has an unhelpful name, being neither new nor a river! It is a water supply aqueduct, completed in 1613, to bring drinking water from Hertfordshire to North London. Before this time, London's water supply was limited to the Thames, local streams and wells which were often contaminated. Thames Water has worked with partners to create a 28 mile long-distance path that follows the river's course. The walk is relatively flat and follows some paved paths, but mainly unmade paths which can be fairly muddy after periods of rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates along the way plus two stiles (with fence surrounds which should be open enough for most dogs to pass through). You will also need to cross the rail line at an unsignalled crossing so take care to look and listen for trains and take care with children and dogs. You will find a few large benches along the route which make a great place for a family picnic. The return leg can be completed by train (see the ‘Getting there' section for details). Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours (plus a bit longer to walk to the start point from Hertford East station).
New River Path Part Two: Rye House to Cheshunt Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.769372,0.005185 A 6 mile waterside linear walk along the second stretch of the New River in Hertfordshire. You're likely to have the company of swans, ducks, geese and coots along the whole journey as you follow the route of the river through central Hertfordshire. The New River has an unhelpful name, being neither new nor a river! It is a water supply aqueduct, completed in 1613, to bring drinking water from Hertfordshire to North London. Before this time, London's water supply was limited to the Thames, local streams and wells which were often contaminated. Thames Water has worked with partners to create a 28 mile long-distance path that follows the river's course. The route is relatively flat and follows some paved paths, but mainly unmade paths which can be fairly muddy after periods of rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates along the way (plus a footbridge if you are walking back to Cheshunt Station at the end). The return leg can be completed by train (see the ‘Getting there' section for details. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Farmoor Reservoir Countryside Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.751452,-1.347428 A 4 mile circular walk following the rural footpaths which surround Thames Water's Farmoor Reservoir in Oxfordshire. The walk is a lovely mix with chance to enjoy views across the reservoir (a popular sailing spot), one stretch along the banks of the River Thames, plus sections of wetland and mixed woodland. The area is very popular with bird watchers and you don't need to be an expert to enjoy the variety of birds that make the most of the varied habitats. The walk follows mostly unmade paths which are narrow in part and can get fairly muddy after periods of rain and in winter. There are several gates to negotiate, but no stiles and the route is relatively flat with just a couple of steady slopes. Dogs are welcome on this countryside walk, but please ensure you stick to the route described as dogs are not allowed on the other paths around the reservoir. There are public toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
New River Path Part Three: Cheshunt to Enfield Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.702919,-0.046412 A 5.5 mile waterside linear walk along the third stretch of the New River in Hertfordshire and London. The walk bridges the sections north and south of the M25, taking you through quiet suburbs, beautiful parks and the picturesque section of the river as it winds through Enfield Town. The New River has an unhelpful name, being neither new nor a river! It is a water supply aqueduct, completed in 1613, to bring drinking water from Hertfordshire to North London. Before this time, London's water supply was limited to the Thames, local streams and wells which were often contaminated. Thames Water has worked with partners to create a 28 mile long-distance path that follows the river's course. The route has just a few steady slopes and follows some paved paths, but mainly unmade paths which can be fairly muddy after periods of rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates and some steps along the way. Whilst the route is waymarked, we found that some of the signs had been rotated round to face the wrong way so take care to check the map and directions regularly. The return leg can be completed by train (see the ‘Getting there' section for details). Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours (plus extra time to walk to/from the rail stations and for the train journeys).
New River Path Part Four: Enfield to Alexandra Palace Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.652976,-0.087384 A 5.5 mile waterside linear walk along the fourth stretch of the New River in London. In this stretch through North London the New River becomes a little more elusive. Half your journey will be along riverside paths with the other half through parks and streets where the river runs underground or out of reach. The New River has an unhelpful name, being neither new nor a river! It is a water supply aqueduct, completed in 1613, to bring drinking water from Hertfordshire to North London. Before this time, London's water supply was limited to the Thames, local streams and wells which were often contaminated. Thames Water has worked with partners to create a 28 mile long-distance path that follows the river's course. The route is relatively flat and follows some paved paths, but mainly unmade paths which can be fairly muddy after periods of rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates and some steps along the way. Whilst the route is waymarked, we found that some of the signs had been rotated round to face the wrong way so take care to check the map and directions regularly. The return leg can be completed by train (see the ‘Getting there' section for details). Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours (plus extra time for the return train journey).
Fobney Island Nature Reserve Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.433906,-0.986037 A 1 mile circular walk around Fobney Island Nature Reserve in Reading, Berkshire. Fobney Island is the perfect place to explore and get to grips with nature with its mosaic of wetland, wildflower meadow, hay meadow and reed bed habitats. The walk is completely flat and follows a hard surfaced path the whole way round. You will need to negotiate a staggered barrier and two kissing gates along the way. Dogs are welcome on this walk (which follows paths in the Eastern Reserve) but please clear up after them (there's a dog bin by the lock at the start of the walk) and don't allow them to cross into the Western Reserve (which is the protected area for wildlife). Approximate time 20 to 30 minutes.
New River Path Part Five: Alexandra Palace to Stoke Newington Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.598154,-0.119662 A 4.5 mile linear walk along the fifth stretch of the New River in London. This diverse section has a bit of everything with chance to see some of the river workings along with residential streets and green open spaces. The New River has an unhelpful name, being neither new nor a river! It is a water supply aqueduct, completed in 1613, to bring drinking water from Hertfordshire to North London. Before this time, London's water supply was limited to the Thames, local streams and wells which were often contaminated. Thames Water has worked with partners to create a 28 mile long-distance path that follows the river's course. The route is relatively flat and follows some paved paths, but mainly unmade paths which can be fairly muddy after periods of rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates and some steps along the way. Whilst the route is waymarked, we found that some of the signs had been rotated round to face the wrong way so take care to check the map and directions regularly. The return leg can be completed by train (see the ‘Getting there' section for details). Approximate time 2 hours (plus extra time for the walk to the station and the return train journey).
New River Path Part Six: Stoke Newington to Islington Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.56398,-0.092411 A 3 mile linear walk along the sixth and final stretch of the New River in London. This section is known as the heritage section and takes in several beautiful parks and pretty streets to reach the New River Head visitor information point. The route follows the historic, but now truncated, New River course although some sections of the water channel are still evident. The New River has an unhelpful name, being neither new nor a river! It is a water supply aqueduct, completed in 1613, to bring drinking water from Hertfordshire to North London. Before this time, London's water supply was limited to the Thames, local streams and wells which were often contaminated. Thames Water has worked with partners to create a 28 mile long-distance path that follows the river's course. The route is relatively flat and follows paved paths/pavements all of which are a good width. You will need to negotiate several gates along the way. Whilst the route is waymarked, we found that some of the signs had been rotated round to face the wrong way so take care to check the map and directions regularly. Dogs are welcome in all the parks within the route. The return leg can be completed by train (see the ‘Getting there' section for details). Approximate time 1.5 hours (plus extra time for the walk to/from the stations and the return train journey).
London's Ridgeway: Plumstead to Abbey Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.489707,0.084954 A 3.5 mile linear walk along London's Ridgeway, a raised footpath along the top of the embankment of Thames Water's southern outfall sewer. The path also marks the boundary of Thamesmead, the district built from the late 1960s on former marshland to alleviate overcrowding in other parts of the city. The walk is ideal for those looking for a short stroll in this area of the city. The walk follows a mix of grass/dirt track and paved paths, the former of which are generally firm but can be a bit muddy in winter and after rain. There are several large kissing gates on route, designed to accommodate cyclists, and the route is relatively flat. The path through Erith Marshes has several tethered horses so take care with dogs on this stretch. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
The Maybush Inn and Deben Estuary Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.052659,1.33149 A 3.5 mile pub walk from the Maybush Inn in Waldringfield, Suffolk. The Maybush was originally a 14th century farmhouse, and today is a great Adnams pub with panoramic views across the river and beyond. The walking route combines two elements, meaning the walk can be shortened if you wish to complete just one of these elements. The first part is a ‘there and back' walk down through the salt marshes to reach Early Creek, whilst the second part follows a circular route through the village and surrounding arable land. There are great views throughout and plenty of opportunity to enjoy the birds within the estuary. The walk follows unmade paths, all of which can be fairly muddy. The first section follows an embankment path out through the salt marshes at the edge of the river estuary. It is best to walk around low tide and, as the path is subject to erosion/flooding, only walk as far as it is safe to do so. Be careful as the path is uneven and take care with children and dogs to ensure they don't wander onto the dangerous mud flats. The second part includes one section of roadside walking along a quiet lane so take care of any traffic at this point. There are no gates or stiles on route, and the gradients are all very steady. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Wherry Inn River and Heritage Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.472615,1.516384 A 4.5 mile circular pub walk from the Wherry Inn in Geldeston, Norfolk. The Wherry Inn is a classic village pub and a great place to enjoy a bite of lunch after your walk. The walk is a fantastically varied route with something for everyone. It heads out alongside the banks of the River Waveney to reach the nearby village of Dunburgh. From this point the route follows a mixture of quiet lanes and field paths to visit more local settlements and several of the impressive halls and churches along the way. The route has just a few steady slopes and follows mostly unmade paths, many of which (including the fields) can get very muddy after rain and in winter. There is one tall stile on route which has gaps underneath which medium dogs should be able to squeeze under, but large dogs may need a lift over (our standard poodle just managed to squeeze underneath). You will also need to negotiate a few flights of steps and several kissing gates (a couple of which are quite tight). One of the fields you cross may be holding horses so take care with dogs. There are a couple of sections of road walking along country lanes so take care of any traffic at these points. Approximate time 2 hours.
The White Hart and Blyth Estuary Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.321692,1.597933 A 2 mile circular pub walk from the White Hart in Blythburgh, Suffolk. The White Hart dates from the 16th century and is a traditional country inn known for its oak-beamed interior. The walking route heads south along the edge of the Blyth Estuary with plenty of birdlife to enjoy, before returning via green lanes and paths to visit the village church, known as the Cathedral of the Marshes. The route is fairly flat and follows unmade paths which can be muddy after rain and can also get a little overgrown in the summer. There is one kissing gate and some steps to negotiate along the way. You will need to cross the A12 twice and the road can be busy so take particular care at these points. Approximate time 1 hour.
Keys and Crown: The Snape Heath and River Pub Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.169193,1.500287 A 4 mile circular pub trail in Snape, Suffolk starting and finishing at two great Adnams pubs: The Golden Key and The Crown Inn. With pubs at the start and finish of this circular trail, you get chance to have lunch before your walk and then a drink at the end, or vice versa. The walking route heads out through farmland and across the beautiful heath of Snape Warren to reach the River Alde. There's also an opportunity to visit the famous Snape Maltings, a lovely collection of shops, galleries and concert hall, before returning to Snape village. The views are beautiful throughout and there is plenty of wildlife to enjoy along the way. The route follows a mixture of pavements/village roads and heath/marsh/field paths, the latter of which can be quite muddy after periods of rain and in winter. The paths can be quite narrow in places but there are no stiles on route, just a couple of kissing gates. There are just a couple of gentle slopes, with most of the route being entirely flat. Snape Warren is grazed by Exmoor Ponies so take care with dogs in this section. There are a couple of sections walking along quiet lanes so take care of any traffic at these points. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Eel's Foot Minsmere and Dunwich Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.239028,1.590651 A 5 mile circular pub trail from the Eel's Foot in Eastbridge, Suffolk. The Eel's Foot is a traditional, cosy inn set in the heart of Suffolk's Heritage Coast and the ideal place for refreshments before or after your walk. The walking route performs a simple loop out to the coast and back, taking in stretches though Minsmere Nature Reserve, the Suffolk Coastal Path and Dunwich Heath along the way. There are beautiful views to enjoy, lots of birdlife within the reserves and a chance for a paddle in the sea. The walk has just a few gentle gradients and follows woodland, heath and beach paths which can get a bit muddy after rain and in winter. There are no stiles on route, just a few kissing gates to negotiate. Dogs are welcome along the entire route, but they must be on short leads in Dunwich Heath in order to protect the ground nesting bird populations. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Bells and White Horses: The Middleton and Westleton Pub Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.254911,1.557906 A 4 mile circular walk taking in two Adnams pubs in Suffolk; The Bell Inn in Middleton and The White Horse in Westleton. Apologies if you were expecting a connection with the ‘Ride a Cock Horse to Banbury Cross' nursery rhyme! With a pub at the start and one half-way round there are endless excuses for lunch, dinner or just sampling the ale. The route follows the farmland and heath paths connecting the villages, taking in this peaceful stretch of the Suffolk countryside. There are just a few gentle gradients and some of the unmade paths can become quite muddy after rain and in winter. There is one kissing gate and one stile on route (the stile has an open fence surround for dogs to pass through), but both the gate and stile can be avoided if you need, with just a short diversion along the village road. There are a couple of sections of walking along country lanes plus one section along the edge of a busier road – so take particular care of traffic at these points. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Ship Inn and Orwell Estuary Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.004428,1.254432 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Ship Inn in Levington, Suffolk. The Ship Inn is a great cosy inn which probably dates back to the 13th century and still retains some of the ship timbers from which it was built – hence the name. The walking route performs a simple loop, heading out along the edge of the Orwell Estuary and then returning through the woodland of the Broke Hall Estate. There are beautiful sections of woodland, teaming with wild flowers every spring plus great views across the River Orwell throughout. There are several steady gradients throughout the walk and many of the paths (particularly the woodland bridleways) can become quite muddy after rain and in winter. There are no stiles on route, just a single kissing gate and a few steps. The last half a mile follows a stretch of a quiet country lane so take care of any traffic here. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
The Butt and Oyster, Cliff Plantation and Woolverstone Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.996372,1.212368 A 5.5 mile figure-of-eight pub walk from the Butt and Oyster in the hamlet of Pin Mill, Suffolk. The Butt and Oyster sits right on the banks of the River Orwell and is renowned for its Adnams ales, good food and great views. The walking route consists of two loops from the hamlet, meaning you can complete the entire walk (5.5 miles) or just walk the first loop into Cliff Plantation (2.5 miles) or the second loop into Woolverstone Park (3 miles). There's huge variety throughout the walk with dense woodland, cliff-top views, quiet farm lanes, formal parkland and the harbours and marinas along the River Orwell. The route has steady gradients throughout plus one steep (but short) climb within Cliff Plantation. There are steps, gates and stiles to negotiate on both loops. There is just one stile within the first loop (with open fencing to the side for dogs to pass through) and four stiles within the second loop (all with purpose-built dog gates at the side). The paths can be fairly muddy after rain and in winter. The paths through Woolverstone Park cross fields that are likely to be holding sheep so take care with dogs. The hamlet of Pin Mill gets very busy at peak times (weekends, holidays) so it might be best to time your walk for a quieter day. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours for the full walk.
The Clare and Cavendish Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.076354,0.582059 A 7.5 mile circular trail from Clare, Suffolk. There's plenty of interest along the way taking in the two historic settlements with lots of pretty cottages, churches, museums, antiques centres, shops, cafes, pubs, a castle and a dismantled railway – more than enough to make a full day out. The paths between the towns follow long stretches through peaceful arable farmland with fabulous views. The walk includes several climbs and descents throughout. The paths follow field edges and farm tracks and can be very muddy in winter and after periods of rain. You will need to negotiate a number of kissing gates plus four stiles. The first stile has a squeeze gap alongside (suitable for all dogs and slim humans!), the middle two have dog flaps within (plenty big enough for a labrador or equivalent) and the final one is only about 30cm high (so most dogs should be able to hop over just fine). Whilst the vast majority of the route follows arable field paths, one field is likely to be holding sheep and one field is likely to be holding a small herd of beef cattle (including a bull in April and May). This field is very large and the path across it is short and the farmer describes the cows and bull as docile but, as always, take particular care if you have dogs with you. There are a couple of short sections along quiet country lanes so take care of any traffic at these points. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
The Ferry Inn and Bure Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.637929,1.591835 A 5 mile circular pub walk from the Ferry Inn in Stokesby, Norfolk. The Ferry Inn is a lovely country pub set alongside the River Bure, offering picturesque, tranquil and unspoilt surroundings. The walking route explores the traditional farming landscape of the Broads, taking in the marshes and dykes which are home to a wide variety of wildlife. The walking route is almost entirely flat. You will need to negotiate one gate and two footbridges on route, but there are no stiles. The grass embankment paths are fairly narrow and uneven. They can be muddy in winter and a bit overgrown summer (so shorts are not recommended unless you are immune to nettles!) Approximate time 2 hours.
Kings and Sailors: The Orford Heritage and Pub Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.091828,1.537708 A 5.5 mile (can be shortened to 4.5 miles) circular trail from Orford, Suffolk. With opportunity to visit two Adnams pubs along the way, the Jolly Sailor and the King's Head, there are lots of options for refreshments before or after your walk. The walking route takes in a lovely stretch of the River Alde before turning inland, with an optional arm into the old Sudbourne Estate, and back into Orford with chance to visit the 12th century Orford Castle. The walk has just a few gentle slopes and the riverside/farm paths can be a little muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are no stiles on route, just a few steps and a couple of gates to negotiate. There are a couple of stretches along the village/country lanes so take care of any traffic at these points. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
The Greenway: Stratford to Beckton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.5413,-0.002757 IMPORTANT NOTE: The Greenway section from Stratford High Street to Manor Park Bridge is close from 9 February 2015 for 45 weeks (December 2015)whilst Thames Water undertake repair works. There are suggested pedestrian diversions in place around the adjacent streets, but this walking route itself is currently closed. A 4.5 mile linear walk along London's Greenway, a raised footpath along the top of the embankment of Thames Water's northern outfall sewer. The walk starts alongside the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, with chance to glimpse the park's distinctive landmarks, and also passes the beautiful Abbey Mills Pumping Station. The Greenway provides a wonderful traffic-free route to enjoy with family and friends. The walk is almost entirely flat and follows surfaced paths for the whole length. There are no stiles on route, just a couple of wide gates to negotiate, so it would be suitable for pushchairs. The Greenway path is open from 5.30am every day and is locked at 7pm in winter (Oct to Mar) and at 9pm in summer (Apr to Sep). From Feb 2014 to Mar 2015 Thames Water is undertaking works to repair Victorian bridges along the route, so there may be some minor diversions. Dogs are welcome on the Greenway footpath. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The ViewTube and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.535342,-0.013384 A 3 mile linear walk from the ViewTube, a bright green community venue and cafe made from recycled shipping containers and with great views of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. The walking route heads out along the Greenway, a raised footpath along the top of the embankment of Thames Water's northern outfall sewer, before joining a stretch of the towpath alongside the River Lee Navigation. The final stretch of the walk explores the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, with its beautiful landscaped gardens and iconic buildings such as the Orbit viewing tower and Aquatics Centre. The walk is almost entirely flat and follows fairly wide surfaced paths throughout. There are no stiles or gates to negotiate, just a few flights of steps, so it would be possible to complete it with a pushchair if you are happy to manage the steps. Dogs are welcome in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Baggeridge Wood Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.5357995,-2.1512222 This walk takes you from Gospel End Common, through Baggeridge Woods and then up past the Wishing Pool, located in Baggeridge Park. Along the walk you will see Upper Meadow Orchard, Gospel End Common and Stone Circle, Baggeridge Woods, the Wishing Pools located in Baggeridge Park and then return to the Pay & Display car park. This walk affords views of the surrounding areas, fields, ponds and woodland. It is quite close to the historic Himley Hall, although you will not visit it on this walk. The Park has been awarded the Green Flag Award for thirteen consecutive years, and has a picnic area available. There is a tea shop, a children's play area, a miniature railway, a sensory garden and disabled toilets. Other nearby attractions include Penn Common and Himley Hall & Park. The walk is along a flat route for the most part. However, there are several gates and stiles, a couple of challenging gradients and a short flight of steps. The route can also be quite muddy in parts. It will take approximately 1 hour 30 minutes.
Himley and Swindon Canal Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.51897659,-2.18873415 This is a 5 mile circular walk that starts at the dismantled Himley Station, follows the South Staffs Railway line, turns along the Wom Brook then heads onto the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal, before turning back along Hinksford Lane and returning to Himley. It encompasses woodland and towpath sections. It is covered by OS Explorer map 219. For the very most part, the path follows made footpaths. However, there is a short stretch, just after Hinksford Lock that follows a dirt path. There are a couple of stiles and several flights of steps. The gradients are quite shallow, however. The towpath section of the trail is popular with cyclists.
Rawcliffe and the River Aire Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.698232,-0.964143 A 4 mile circular walk from the small village of Rawcliffe in the East Riding of Yorkshire. The route explores some of the village's history, then follows a pretty stretch of the River Aire before returning to Rawcliffe through the surrounding peaceful farmland. The walk is relatively flat, the only challenging section being one short steep slope down the side of a grassy embankment. The paths are unmade and so can be fairly muddy after rain and can also be narrow and a little overgrown in places. There are no stiles on route, just a few kissing gates and a couple of narrow footbridges. Whilst most of the paths cross crop fields, the riverside path follows a grass embankment pasture which is likely to be holding a small herd of cattle, so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Staffs Railway Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.521484,-2.164233 A 5 mile circular walk that takes you from Himley Hall & Park, through Baggeridge Woods, along the Wom Brook in Wombourne then follows the path of the dismantled South Staffs Railway line back to Himley. This trail encompasses woodland, fields, a small brook and then managed woodland walks. There are several points of interest along the route, including Himley Hall and the adjacent St Michael and All Angels church. For the most part, the route follows a footpath. However, there are several stiles and some steps and a section of the trail goes through an arable field. The gradients are mainly shallow. There is a busy road crossing and also several hundred yards of track alongside a busy road at the end of the trail. There are toilets available in the park. These are not disabled, however there are disabled toilets available within Himley Hall. Be aware that opening times for the Hall vary. Pay and Display parking is available at Himley Hall & Park, £1.10 for up to 2 hours and £1.60 for over 2 hours (correct as of May 2014). Parking is open from 7AM until dusk, all year round. There is also a café at the nearby Golf Centre.
Baggeridge Toposcope Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.534824,-2.151487 This walk takes you from Baggeridge car park up to the Toposcope, which affords views of the surrounding countryside, and then returns you via a different route to the car park. On a clear day, it is said that the Welsh Mountains can be seen from this point. The Toposcope is a flat disc with radii that will show you what is visible in a given direction, through 360°. It is useful to bring a pair of binoculars. Baggeridge Park has been awarded the Green Flag Award for thirteen consecutive years, and has a picnic area available. There is a tea shop, a children's play area, a miniature railway, a sensory garden and disabled toilets. Other nearby attractions include Penn Common and Himley Hall & Park. The walk is along a flat route at the beginning. However, there are a couple of quite steep flights of steps to and from the Toposcope. On the way back, there is a nature board detailing the local topography known as The Pit Mounds. It will take approximately 45 minutes.
Stamford Bridge and the River Derwent Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.990836,-0.915922 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the historic village of Stamford Bridge in the East Riding of Yorkshire. You'll have chance to explore the history of the village including the site of the Battle of Stamford Bridge and the old rail line, plus a long peaceful stretch alongside the idyllic River Derwent. The walk is almost entirely flat, some of the paths being fairly narrow and muddy/slippery after wet weather. There are no stiles on route, just several kissing gates and a squeeze gap to negotiate. Two of the fields you cross may be holding cattle so take care with dogs. About one mile of the route follows a quiet country lane which doesn't have pavements so take care of traffic on this stretch. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Kinver to Stourton via Gibbet Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.448886,-2.229229 This is a 4.5 mile circular walk that starts in the picturesque village of Kinver, leads to the supposedly haunted Gibbet Woods in Wollaston, then to the site of the Stewponey, then past the entrance to Stourton Castle, before heading into Chance Woods and returning to Kinver. The walk encompasses a busy village, fields, woodland and several points of interest. It will take about 4 hours at a very steady pace, 2.5 hours if you take a more athletic approach. This walk has about a dozen stiles to navigate and some steep inclines and steps. Not suitable for the less mobile. There are some footpaths but also lots of field crossings, some of which will contain animals. Please keep dogs on a lead at all times. There are also busy roads to navigate. Disabled toilets are available at the suggested start point, however these are not free. There is a pub on the walk, very close to the beginning.
Black Country Volcano Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.51099473,-2.11919403 This is a 2 mile circular walk that follows a trail around Barrow Hill, near to Pensnett in the West Midlands. The site in question is the location of an ancient volcano (now extinct, thankfully), and there are several nature boards on the site that detail the area's history. The walk circumambulates the site and leads you to the cross atop the hill, which affords views of the surrounding area. The name 'Barrow' Hill comes from the two Bronze Age burial mounds found on the hill, which have since been lost to mining activities. The route encompasses woodland and footpaths, and also leads the walker past St Mark's Church. Parts of the route, between waypoints 1 and 2 are quite muddy, and there is some climbing of steps up to the cross. Expect to take 1.5 - 2 hours to complete.
Dudley No 2 Canal: Section 1 Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.49555,-2.065492 A 7 mile 'there and back' walk along the section of the Dudley No 2 Canal from Bumble Hole to Dudley Tunnel. The route goes past Netherton Reservoir and Blower's Green Pumping House. The walk follows well maintained paths and towpaths and takes you along the first half of the Dudley No 2 canal route. As with the second half (published as a separate walk on iFootpath), there are several information signs along the way detailing the history of the area. As this is the Black Country, some sections of the route are more heavily developed than others. However, there is a lot of wildlife to see. You may wish to spend a little time exploring Windmill End, including a visit to the visitors centre. However, it's run by volunteers and opening times vary. Mornings are generally your best bet. Alternatively, call on 01384 814100 to check opening times.
Cotwall End Valley Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.53229966,-2.1309616 This is a 2 mile circular walk round Cotwall End Valley, which is between Sedgley and Gornal in the West Midlands. The route follows a path through grassy fields & woodland and for the latter part runs alongside a brook. The route is set in quiet countryside. Brockswood Animal Sanctuary is very nearby, 350m away in Catholic Lane. Parts of this route are extremely muddy and there is some climbing over low barriers involved. There are also 4 flights of steps. The route up until the first waypoint is easily accessible, with only one flight of steps. There are no toilets nearby.
The Cricketers Horsell Common and Mill Bourne Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.326421,-0.582335 A 5.5 mile circular pub walk from The Cricketers in Horsell, near Woking in Surrey. The Cricketers prides itself on delivering fantastic food with great friendly service. The walking route is an ideal morning ramble to build up an appetite for lunch. You'll enjoy a lovely variety of landscapes including the heathland paths across Horsell Common, the riverside paths along the Mill Bourne as well as horse paddocks, meadows and woodland. The route is generally flat. The paths are all unmade and can be fairly muddy (especially where the bridleways are churned by the horses) so good boots are a must. The paths are also narrow in part and can get a little overgrown in the summer so long trousers are recommended (unless you're immune to nettles!). There are several gates/kissing gates to negotiate as well as some footbridges and two stiles (both stiles have gaps alongside which should be suitable for most dogs). You will need to cross one paddock which is likely to be holding horses and Horsell Common is also grazed for conservation by cattle at some times so take care with dogs at these points. The route crosses a number of roads and there are a couple of short sections of road walking so take care of traffic at these points. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Tipton Circular Canal Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.5303283,-2.065868 This is a 4 mile circular walk around Tipton's canals. It starts and ends very close to Tipton Railway Station and follows canal towpaths for the entire route. The walk takes you through some of Tipton's manufacturing heritage and along some surprisingly rural tracks. There is a large amount of wildlife to be seen. The walk is 95% flat, with a few shallow inclines and bridges. Take care in icy weather, though, as some of the bricks that form the footpath would likely be slippery. It is quite suitable for someone with a lower level of fitness, or perhaps for children. There are several Radar Key Scheme gates along the route.
The Aspinall Arms and Ribble Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.84357,-2.431982 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Aspinall Arms in Little Mitton, Lancashire. The Aspinall Arms is a coaching inn believed to date from the 17th century and offers lovely views over the river, the perfect lunch stop before or after your walk. The walking route takes in the glorious Ribble Valley following a mixture of riverside paths, grazing pastures, ancient lanes and wild moorland with excellent views throughout. There are several steady climbs and descents throughout. The paths are a mixture of pavements, stone tracks and grass paths across pastures, the latter of which can be very muddy after rain so good boots are a must. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates and four stiles. Some of the kissing gates are quite tight (be prepared to breath in!) and the stiles are quite enclosed (small/medium dogs should be able to squeeze through the gaps but larger dogs may need a lift over). You will be sharing some of the pastures with cattle and/or sheep so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Worsley Old Hall Old Rail Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.505491,-2.390745 A 4 mile circular pub walk from Worsley Old Hall in Worsley, Greater Manchester. Worsley Old Hall is a beautiful country house pub with important historical connections, the perfect place from which to discover the local area. The walking route takes in the immediate area of Worsley including the golf course, the old rail line and Worsley Woods nature reserve, with plenty of opportunity to enjoy the flora and fauna. The walk is almost entirely flat, with just a couple of short slopes. The paths are a mixture of tarmac and stone/dirt the latter of which stay generally firm but can have a little bit of surface mud after rain. There are no stiles or gates on route, just some steps, staggered barriers and a couple of squeeze gaps. The walk crosses a golf course so please show respect for the golfers by allowing them to play their shots before you cross and take care to avoid any stray golf balls. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Hurst Green and the Ribble Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.837179,-2.480204 A 5.5 mile circular pub walk through the spectacular Ribble Valley in the Forest of Bowland. The walk starts and finishes at The Bayley Arms, a pub with great character and ambience and perfect for refreshments before or after your walk. The route takes in the riverside path alongside the Ribble plus the surrounding fields and tracks. There are beautiful views throughout as you take in this peaceful and tranquil setting which, some speculate, could have been Tolkien's inspiration for the Shires in the Lord of the Rings novels. There are several climbs and descents throughout and the paths are generally grass paths and tracks across pastures which can be very muddy after rain. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates plus six stiles, all of which are fairly enclosed so dogs may need a lift over. Several of the pastures you cross are likely to be holding cattle and/or sheep so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Sussex Hospices Trail Part 8: Alfriston to Eastbourne Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.823881,0.162407 A 10 mile linear walk from Alfriston village to Eastbourne rail station in East Sussex, forming the 8th stretch of the Sussex Hospices Trail. For almost every step of the way, this stretch accompanies the South Downs Way. You will see lovely Sussex villages, the best of the South Downs National Park and the bustling seaside town of Eastbourne. The hospices of Sussex are dedicated to providing specialist end-of-life care. Friends of Sussex Hospices has worked with partners and supporters to create the Sussex Hospices Trail, a 200 mile long-distance path to support and raise awareness of the twelve hospice care providers that serve the adults and children of Sussex. The route is clear and well signposted and there will usually be other walkers, cyclists or runners on your route. Please note that even on the warmest day it can be windy on the ridge above Eastbourne. The route is quite steep in parts although the way is clear and the paths are well-walked. The chalk paths and tracks can become very muddy and slippery after wet weather. You will need to negotiate a number of gates and road crossings but there are no stiles on route. You will be sharing some of the paths with livestock so take particular care with dogs. The return leg can be completed with a bus journey of about 35 minutes. Allow 5 hours.
The Red Lion, Longdon and Cannock Chase Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.719735,-1.8759 A 6.5 mile (can be shortened to 4.5 miles) circular pub walk from the Red Lion in Longdon Green, Staffordshire. The Red Lion is a classic village pub, a great place to satisfy your hunger after a morning's ramble in the surrounding hills. The walking route is fairly challenging due to the nature of the surfaces and the number and design of the stiles but, if you're up to it, you'll be rewarded with fabulous views of the rolling hills throughout. The optional loop within the full walk takes in a pretty section of the Cannock Chase woodland which is awash with wild flowers every spring. The route has several climbs and descents throughout. The walking surfaces appear to be seldom used and so can be fairly uneven, muddy, narrow and overgrown in places. The optional loop into the Cannock Chase woodland valley can have standing water after periods of rain. The paths cross several pastures grazed by a mixture of horses, sheep and cattle. There are a couple of short sections of road walking along quiet country lanes so take care of any traffic. You will need to negotiate a number of gates, a couple of footbridges plus around 30 stiles. Some of the stiles are fairly tall and of a vertical ladder design, meaning you will need to climb several rungs (which may be difficult for less able people). Some of the stiles are also fully enclosed with wire and there is one double stile with no gaps alongside, so taking a dog along will be very challenging. With all this in mind you will need to be prepared with good boots, long trousers and a spring in your step! Approximate time 3 to 3.5 hours (or 2 to 2.5 hours for the shorter version).
The Alford Arms and the Chiltern Hills Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.7777,-0.527739 IMPORTANT NOTE: We are sad to report that the Alford Arms suffered a fire on 27 Feb 2016 and so will be closed until late summer 2016. Thankfully no-one was hurt and we wish the team well with the renovation. A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Alford Arms in Frithsden, Hertfordshire. The Alford Arms has a wonderful philosophy of ‘children, dogs and muddy boots welcome', but don't think spit and sawdust. You'll find a friendly atmosphere, good local ales, carefully chosen wines and delicious meals (including the best Sunday roast we've had in years). The walking route takes in the surrounding rolling hills of the Chilterns, with ancient lanes, pastures, woodlands and water meadows. There are lovely views throughout and the chance to see plenty of wildlife. The route includes several long and steady climbs and descents, plus a couple of steeper sections. The paths are firm in the main, but can get muddy after rain or in winter and the water meadows (as the name suggests) can be quite marshy so good boots are a must. There are no stiles on route, just some kissing gates to negotiate. There are a couple of short sections of walking along the country lanes so take care of traffic at these points. Two of the fields you cross may be holding cattle and/or sheep so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Himley, Lydiates Hill and Baggeridge Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.521304,-2.164207 A 3.5 mile circular and fairly strenuous walk starting at Himley. The route leads through White's Wood, takes you up the Miner's Path, through Lydiates Wood, around the Bag Pool at Baggeridge, then back down along lesser known, steeper trails to Himley. It encompasses woodland and ponds/pools. It starts in Himley and goes through Baggeridge, returning to Himley at the end. Allow 2 to 3 hours for the walk. Certain parts of the walk are very steep and some are very muddy. There are some steps during the steep parts, but these are not always in good repair. This walk deliberately avoids the well known trails for the most part, so whilst this means it is often quiet, the paths are also not as well maintained. There are occasional benches. There are toilets available on the walk, at Himley and at Baggeridge. There is also a teashop available at Baggeridge.
Orton Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.543933,-2.192784 This is a 3 mile circular walk around the roads and woods of Orton, near Wolverhampton. The route heads out along the disused South Staffs Railway Line, then follows roads and woodland tracks, before returning to base via several fields. Points of interest include Orton House, a Grade II listed building from the Georgian period, and Ladywell Wood which takes its name from a well that can be found in the wood (although this is not be visited on the trail). There are quite a few stiles and kissing gates along the route, and parts of it are somewhat overgrown. Waterproof trousers are recommended. Some of the tracks can get muddy in wet weather. The route is covered by OS map 219.There is a cafe, The Railway Cafe, at the start/finish of the walk (closed Mondays except Bank Holidays). Allow 1.5 to 2 hours to complete.
Saltwells Local Nature Reserve Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.480005,-2.099094 This is a 3 mile circular walk that takes you from Saltwells Nature Reserve, past St Andrew's Church (not visited on this walk) and Lodge Farm Reservoir before returning to the Nature Reserve car park. The route follows the Sculpture Trail for a short distance, then leads onto the Murray Grey trail. There are a couple of nature boards on the route, one of which details the "bell pits", an unusual type of coal mine, and you will see several sculptures. The name "Murray Grey" refers to the breed of cattle that can occasionally be seen grazing in the field on the other side of the canal. You will need to negotiate one stile and a couple of kissing gates. Most of the paths are tarmac, but there are also a few across open grassland. There is a free car park at the start of the walk, however, there are no other amenities nearby (except a pub on the same road, The Saltwells Inn.)
The Crown and Cushion and Hawley Common Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.307272,-0.804263 A 5.5 mile (can be shortened to 3 miles) circular pub walk from the Crown and Cushion in Minley near Blackwater, Surrey. The Crown and Cushion is an historic gem, steeped in history and even includes a medieval-style banqueting hall. The walking route explores the adjacent Hawley Common, taking in miles of the pretty woodland tracks with a chance to see the wildlife within the forest and the wildfowl on Hawley Lake. The shorter version of the walk is almost entirely flat, the longer loop having a few long but very gentle gradients. There are no stiles or gates on either route, just a few gaps alongside vehicle barriers to negotiate. The paths are a mixture of tarmac/stone firm tracks and softer woodland paths, the latter of which are uneven and can get very muddy after rain and in winter. One section of the route follows the tarmac access lane for Hawley Lake so take care of any traffic for this stretch. Hawley Common is part of the Minley MOD Training Area. This walk follows the public rights of way which are always open to the public, but make sure you pay attention to any safety notices, don't allow children or dogs to stray too far and be prepared for sudden noises! Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours (or 1.5 hours for the shorter version).
Awbridge & Trysull Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.5437533,-2.1927412 This is a 4 mile circular walk from Wombourne in Staffordshire. The route follows the Staffs and Worcs Canal towpath before heading down country lanes and across fields and going past several historic buildings, before returning to the free car park. The walk has views of the local countryside, visits Smestow Brook at a couple of points and also takes in Bratch Locks. The walk is mostly flat, but there are many stiles to navigate and also some parts may be overgrown. Take care when walking down the country roads that have no pavement. There are also several fields with animals in them, so take care with dogs. There is a cafe, The Railway Cafe, at the start of the walk (closed Mondays except Bank Holidays). Allow 2 to 3 hours to complete the trail.
The Star and Ashtead Common Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.326652,-0.327421 A 4 mile circular pub walk from The Star, near Leatherhead in Surrey. The Star is perfectly placed for exploring the adjacent common and on fine days there are gorgeous gardens and decking to enjoy some alfresco dining. The walking route explores the stunning Ashtead Common National Nature Reserve, with views across open countryside, large expanses of ancient woodland and pretty lakes along the way. The route has just a few steady but long climbs and descents. Some of the paths (including those on the first stretch to the ponds) are relatively firm tracks with just some surface mud, but after this point the woodland paths and grassy rides can become fairly soft/muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are no stiles or gates on route. You will be sharing many of the forest tracks with horse riders and cyclists. Dogs are welcome in the common as long as they are kept under control. Approximate time 2 hours.
The Boyne Arms and Burwarton Pole Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.462524,-2.564017 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Boyne Arms in Burwarton, Shropshire. The Boyne Arms is a classic country pub and restaurant, the perfect place for refreshments after your walk. The walking route heads up though Burwarton Park and continues high into the Shropshire Hills, looping through the hillside sheep pastures with pretty lakes and streams to enjoy and magnificent views down to the valley below. The walk follows paths across hillside pastures which can be fairly rough and muddy so good boots are a must. The first half of the walk climbs first steadily and then more steeply up into the hills (about a 180m rise) with the return leg following the equivalent descent. There are several gates along the way plus two stiles (these have wire mesh surrounds so dogs may need a lift over). Most of the way round you will be sharing the paths with sheep and two fields (at the start and then at the end) are likely to be holding cattle, so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2 hours.
The Boyne Arms and Brown Clee Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.46236,-2.562739 A 6.5 mile circular pub walk from the Boyne Arms in Burwarton, Shropshire. The Boyne Arms is a classic country pub and restaurant, the perfect place for refreshments after your walk. The walking route heads up though Burwarton Park and continues up to Abdon Burf, the summit of Brown Clee Hill and the highest point in the Shropshire Hills. The route loops up through the hillside sheep pastures and open moorland with pretty lakes and streams to enjoy and magnificent views across the surrounding area. The return leg follows the permissive tracks through the Burwarton Estate with pretty sections of woodland awash with bluebells in the spring. The walk follows paths across hillside pastures and moorland which can be fairly rough and muddy so good boots are a must. The first half of the walk climbs first steadily and then more steeply up into the hills (a rise of about 280m) with the return leg following the equivalent descent. The summit of Brown Clee Hill is very exposed and weather conditions can change quickly so ensure you are well prepared with appropriate warm clothing. There are several gates along the way plus a few stiles (two of these have wire mesh surrounds so dogs may need a lift over). Most of the way round you will be sharing the paths with sheep and two fields (at the start and then at the end) are likely to be holding cattle, so take care with dogs. Approximate time 3 to 4 hours.
Kingsford to Coldridge Wood Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.436414,-2.260361 This is a 6 mile circular walk that takes you from Kingsford Forest Park through lanes and byways to Coldridge Wood before returning to the start via the grounds of Bodenham Arboretum. It encompasses views of the local countryside and quiet lanes alongside and through fields. Several sections take you through woodland and past a couple of pools. Allow 2 to 3 hours to complete the walk. Some sections of the walk take place on tarmac country roads, others take place through fields. Stout footwear is essential. There is a steep ascent and later a steep descent. Both have wooden steps in place to assist. You will also need to negotiate several kissing gates and stiles. There are disabled toilets available at the start of the walk, and also free parking. There is a waymarked walk available from the car park that is suitable for wheelchairs - the Robin Trail. There are also picnic areas here.
Dudley No 1 Canal to Fens Pool Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.49942185,-2.10020424 This is a 6 mile linear walk that follows the route of the Dudley No 1 Canal from the Dudley Tunnel, before joining the Stourbridge Canal after the Delph locks and then heading up the Fens Pool Branch towards the Fens Pools Nature Reserves. Parts of the route show off the local area's industrial heritage while others are rather more green. The route takes place along well maintained towpaths and footpaths. There is one road crossing. There is a pub, the Tenth Lock, at the second waypoint.
The Boyne Arms and Burwarton Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.462556,-2.564008 A 3 mile pub walk from the Boyne Arms in Burwarton, Shropshire. The Boyne Arms is a classic country pub and restaurant, the perfect place for refreshments after your walk. The walking route visits the ruins of the village church before climbing up into Burwarton Park, the family home of Viscount Boyne, and then back down along the same route. The view point within the park gives you chance to see Burwarton House, the parkland and the surrounding hills and valleys. The walk follows mostly a wide tarmac track with two short sections across grass pastures which can get quite muddy after rain and in winter. The walk climbs steadily to the viewpoint with the return leg following the equivalent descent. There are several simple gates along the way but no stiles or steps. One field you cross (on both the way up and down) is likely to be holding cattle and the pasture at the top of the route will be holding sheep so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Staffs Railway and Staffs & Worcs Canal Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.54392897,-2.19271304 This is an 8 mile circular trail that starts at Wombourn Railway Station, goes up the disused railway line to Compton, then switches to the Staffs and Worcs Canal to head back to the start. Allow 3.5 hours to complete the walk, less if you keep a steady pace. The route offers views of the local countryside, and follows a path through woodland and along canal towpaths. Much wildlife can be seen and heard along this route, and you will also pass by several lock systems. It is also suitable for cyclists. There is a cafe at the start/end of the walk and there are several shops available at Compton, the first waypoint about midway through the walk.
Codsall to Chillington Hall Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.63123991,-2.20035559 This is a 7 mile circular walk, starting in Codsall village, heading out past Chillington Hall and then returning to Codsall. The trail encompasses views of fields and woodlands, and also takes you past Chillington Hall, a Grade I listed building. As this walk takes you through a few kinds of habitat, it is ideal for spotting flora and fauna. Kingfishers and Goldfinches have both been seen along this trail. Large sections of the walk take place on tarmac roads, but there are some sections that can be extremely muddy so stout walking boots are essential. You may be sharing some of the fields with grazing animals. There are several stiles along the route and some parts (including one fairly long stretch) follow the edge of main roads that have no pavement, so take care of traffic.
The Horseshoe Warlingham and Farleigh Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.309744,-0.053272 A 5 mile circular pub walk from The Horseshoe in Warlingham, Surrey. The Horseshoe is a delightful pub serving food all day every day and is perfectly positioned for exploring the surrounding Surrey countryside. The walking route follows paths and tracks through the surrounding peaceful fields and ancient woodlands, visiting two pretty churches along the way and with lots of wildlife to enjoy. The paths and tracks are a mixture of stone and dirt and can get very muddy in places and a little narrow in other parts. Good boots are a must and long trousers are recommended (unless you're immune to nettles!). There are a couple of short climbs and descents along the way. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates plus two stiles (both the stiles have wide open wooden fence surrounds which should be easy for most dogs to pass through). Most of the paths are fenced but you will cross two open fields which may be holding horses so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Highgate Common, Bobbington and Six Ashes Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.50499095,-2.24474645 This is a 9 mile circular trail that starts at Highgate Common, heads past the Red Lion Pub in Bobbington then heads out to Six Ashes, before returning to Highgate Common via fields and byways. The walk encompasses many fields and quiet country roads, and also goes past Halfpenny Green airport. Lots of wildlife is visible along this route, including an unexpected animal between Broadfields Farm and the Ponds at Mere Farm. There are stiles and gates to negotiate along this route, and a few footbridges over streams/brooks. Some bridges are in a state of disrepair, the paths can be overgrown and some tracks are at the lowest point between fields, leading to some very wet patches. It is suggested that this walk not be attempted soon after heavy rain. Some fields will have animals and while the roads are generally quiet, they often lack pavements/footpaths. If you would like refreshments along the way, you will pass The Red Lion at Bobbington.
Elsdon Valley Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.233987,-2.100122 A 3 mile circular walk from the pretty village of Elsdon in Northumberland. Elsdon is the most complete example of a medieval settlement within the Northumberland National Park and you will have chance to see the remains of a motte and bailey castle, a medieval peel tower, an old pinfold and the beautiful old church. The walking route performs a simple loop across the surrounding open hills and moorland with stunning views throughout. The walk follows a tarmac farm access lane for the first mile and then crosses the open moors and fields for the return leg. The fields can get a little boggy in part after wet weather and in winter and the hay fields can be quite long so good boots are a must. There are several steady climbs and descents throughout. For almost the entire route you will be sharing the moorland with sheep and cattle so take care with dogs. You will need to negotiate a number of gates, footbridges, steps and five stiles. Two of the stiles are ladder stiles over stone walls (although the adjacent gates for these may well be open) and the other three are step stiles over wire fencing (these have no gaps underneath so dogs may need a lift over). Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Ros Castle and Hepburn Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.51692,-1.887959 A 4 mile circular (and fairly strenuous) walk near the village of Chillingham in Northumberland. The stunning route climbs high up to the summit of Ros Hill where you'll have spectacular panoramic views of the surrounding moors. There are views across the adjacent cattle park, home to the only wild cattle in Britain, and on a clear day a total of seven castles can be seen from the summit. The walk continues across the remote Hepburn Moor and then on through Hepburn Wood with chance to enjoy plenty of wildlife. The walk has several fairly steep, rocky climbs and descents. The paths are a mixture of tarmac lanes/woodland tracks and narrow paths through the moor and woodland. These latter narrow paths squeeze between thick heather and bracken and can be very uneven and slippery so good boots and long trousers are a must. There are no stiles or kissing gates along the way, just a couple of simple gates. For the first half of the walk you will be sharing the paths with sheep so take care with dogs. None of the paths within the wood/moor are waymarked as it is open access land, so make sure you are well prepared with back-up maps and a fully-charged phone if you are following the route via the App. Approximate time 2 hours.
The Phoenix Trail, Henton and Bledlow Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.725951,-0.863253 This circular walk includes two old railway lines, starting along one that has been converted into a leisure and sculpture trail, and crossing another that is still very much alive to the sound of steam trains on special days, thanks to the efforts of a restoration society. The first of these is the Phoenix Trail, which opened in 2002 and runs for five miles between Princes Risborough and Thame, with 30 artworks along the route, some of which are seen on this walk. The second is the Chinnor and Princes Risborough Railway, which runs most Sundays, some Saturdays and Bank Holidays. The walk also skirts the edge of the Chiltern Hills and passes through a couple of pretty Chiltern villages straddling the Bucks/Oxon border in Henton and Bledlow – each of which has a pub. The terrain is relatively flat and easy, with metalled or solid track for over half the route, with some stiles and kissing gates in the latter stages. It is relatively long however. Allow 3 hours.
Falstone Forest and the River North Tyne Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.180854,-2.436664 A 3 mile circular walk from the small pretty village of Falstone in Northumberland. In the heart of classic Northumberland landscape, the village is the perfect place from which to explore the surrounding hills. The first half of the walk loops through the adjacent hillside forest with the pretty stream, Falstone Burn, running in the base of the gorge. At the top of the hill you will be rewarded with excellent views across the valley before returning into the village for a stretch alongside the River North Tyne. Here you will be able to visit the village Stell, a beautiful stone and steel sculpture created to reflect the welcoming nature of the village. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout. Some of the paths can be narrow, rocky, and uneven whilst other parts can be very marshy so good waterproof boots are a must. There are a couple of gates along the way plus one ladder stile over a stone wall. This isn't too steep and has several rungs so larger agile dogs should be able to climb it. Two of the pastures you cross are likely to be holding cattle and the riverside path is sometimes used to graze sheep so take care with dogs. There are public toilets alongside the Old School tea room within the village. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Hareshaw Linn Waterfall Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.145656,-2.252211 A 3 mile ‘there and back' walk to visit the enchanting waterfall, Hareshaw Linn, in Northumberland. The walk leaves the village of Bellingham and follows the pretty stream, Hareshaw Burn, up along the gorge through beautiful woodland to reach the impressive waterfall. The walk follows a solid stone and rocky path for the entire length which can just have a little surface mud. The route includes several climbs and descents and there are several flights of steps, a couple of gates and some footbridges to negotiate. The path can be slippery in part and the gorge sides slope steeply away down to the stream so take particular care with children and dogs. Dogs are welcome on the path to the waterfall, as long as they are under close control. The car park has an electric car charging point and rubbish bins but no other facilities. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours (longer if you spend more time admiring the burn and falls).
Beamish Park and Causey Arch Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.899712,-1.682009 A 4 mile circular walk from the small village of Causey in County Durham. The walk follows farm tracks and local lanes to reach the nearby woodland within Beamish Park before crossing open countryside to reach the beautiful gorge with Causey Burn flowing at its base. Here you will have chance to explore some of Britain's most important industrial heritage, visiting Causey Arch, the oldest surviving single arch railway bridge. The walk follows a mixture of lanes, tracks and paths through woodland and fields. Whilst some of the paths are surfaced with stone, others can get fairly muddy and some of the fenced field-side paths can also get overgrown in the summer. Good boots and long trousers are a must. There are a couple of steady climbs and descents plus an optional steeper section into the gorge bottom. There are several sections of walking along roads and, whilst the main roads have pavements, the smaller roads do not, so take care of traffic at these points. You will need to negotiate five stiles (all of which have open fence surrounds for dogs to pass through) plus a number of flights of steps and a few wooden footbridges. Approximate time 2 hours.
Bamburgh Castle and Budle Point Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.607744,-1.710397 A 4 mile circular walk from the popular village of Bamburgh in the Northumberland Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The capital of ancient Northumbria, Bamburgh is notable for three things, all of which you can explore whilst following this route. First, Bamburgh Castle is one of Northumberland's most iconic buildings and serves as a backdrop to the entire route. Second, the extensive sandy beaches are some of the best in England, ideal for picnics or rock pooling. Finally, the village is the final resting place of Grace Darling, the Victorian heroine famed for participating in the rescue of a shipwreck in 1838. Bamburgh is a very popular tourist destination so if you want to avoid the crowds it is better to visit on weekdays or out of season. The route follows the beach/sand dunes for the outward leg which, as with all sand, is a bit of a workout. There are a couple of rockier sections too so watch your step. If you want to enjoy the largest expanse of the golden beach, time your walk to avoid high tide. Dogs are welcome on the beach but please clear up after them. The return leg crosses a golf course (be sure to watch out for flying golf balls) and then follows the grass verge alongside the B-road back into the village. Where the grass verge gets narrow in a couple of places take good care to avoid the passing traffic which can be heavy at peak times. There are no stiles to negotiate, just a few kissing gates. You will pass public toilets on the way back into the village. Approximate time 2 hours.
Hadrian's Wall and Winshield Crags Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.00309,-2.390871 A 7.5 mile circular, and fairly strenuous, walk within the Northumberland National Park, close to the small village of Haltwhistle. The route follows one of the best preserved sections of Hadrian's Wall before returning through the rolling hillside pastures to the south. There are magnificent views throughout as you explore the Roman remains and there is plenty of wildlife to enjoy along the way. The walk includes many fairly steep climbs and descents throughout. The wall-side path can be fairly uneven and rocky in places and the pasture paths can get quite boggy so good boots are a must. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates plus five stiles. The stile types are three wooden ladder stiles over stone walls, one standard wooden stile and one stone stile over a stone wall. All of these should be suitable for agile dogs to negotiate. The last mile of the walk follows a quiet tarmac lane so take care of any traffic on this stretch. You will be sharing the majority of the route with sheep and cattle grazing so take care with dogs, but the fields are very large hillside pastures so you are able to keep a good distance away from any cattle if needed. Approximate time 3.5 to 4 hours.
Bonded Warehouse to Whittington Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.46103954,-2.14899466 This is a 6 mile linear walk from the Bonded Warehouse in Stourbridge to Whittington Lock via Kinver, following the canal towpath. The walk takes in views of the surrounding countryside which contains fields and woodland. It also offers the opportunity to see boats along the canal. At the start of the walk, there are signs of Stourbridge's industrial past and there are a few nature boards along the walk giving more information. The route takes place entirely along the canal towpath, which is well maintained. There are no stiles, but there are a few pinch gates to navigate and some radar key scheme gates. There are also bridges to cross and go under, some of which will have very little headroom. The route is suitable for cyclists. There are a couple of pubs along the walk. There are several in Stourbridge and also the Vine at Kinver. There are disabled public toilets available at Court Street in Stourbridge and in the High Street car park at Kinver. There are also shops available in kinver and Stourbridge.
Marsden Bay and Cleadon Hills Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.964412,-1.35963 A 5 mile circular coastal walk from Marsden in Tyne and Wear. The route heads inland through the rolling farmland and meadows before returning along a stretch of the dramatic coast. There is plenty of interest along the way with old windmills, the iconic Cleadon Water Tower, the impressive coastal sea stacks and lovely views throughout, which stretch for miles around. The walk has several long but gentle climbs and descents. The paths are generally firm but can be muddy in winter and some parts can be a little overgrown in the summer so long trousers are recommended. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates plus seven stiles (low stone stiles and low wooden stiles with large open gaps alongside that should be easy for most dogs to pass through or climb over). The fields along the route were all crop fields (not holding any livestock) at the time of writing. The route crosses a golf course so take particular care here to avoid any flying stray golf balls. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Barnard Castle and the River Tees Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.544283,-1.923053 A 4 mile circular walk from the market town of Barnard Castle in County Durham. At first glance the walk seems to be a simple stroll along the river and back, but in fact there's plenty of extra interest. There are several old mills, churches, an enormous chateau, the ruins of an old abbey and Barnard Castle itself to enjoy along the way. The walk is relatively flat with just a few gentle slopes and one steeper but short slope up to the castle. The walk follows a mixture of tarmac pavements and riverside paths through grazing pastures and woodland. The latter can get fairly muddy and can be very uneven underfoot. There are some gates and kissing gates along the way plus two stiles and two stone squeeze gaps. The wooden stiles have gaps alongside suitable for most dogs to pass under, although the stone squeeze gaps are quite tight so broader dogs may struggle. Several of the large open pastures you cross are likely to be holding sheep (and possibly cattle). Approximate time 2 hours.
Brewood Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.67722209,-2.17257534 This is a 6 mile circular walk commencing in Brewood (pronounced "brood") and following lanes past Chillington Hall before returning to Brewood via the canal towpath. The walk offers views of the local countryside and canals, and also of Chillington Hall in the distance. The walk is along quite a flat route for the most part. There are no challenging gradients. There are several stiles, but most of the fields are flat. Parts of the towpath can be muddy, even in dry weather. Some of the fields contain animals.
Allenheads and Byerhope Bank Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.802544,-2.219855 A 5.5 mile circular walk from the former lead mining community of Allenheads in Northumberland. The route explores the remaining traces of the mining industry and then climbs onto Byerhope Bank, striking out through the high moor. You will be sharing the moor with sheep as well as many ground nesting birds which the moor is specifically managed to protect. The return leg follows the course of the River East Allen, a pretty river through the valley bottom which flows over several rocky and stepped weirs. The route has several fairly steep climbs and descents and follows a mixture of quiet lanes, stone tracks and grass paths through the moor and alongside the river. The open moor is very exposed so ensure you have appropriate clothing with you. The riverside can be muddy and can also get a little overgrown in one section so long trousers and good boots are a must. Take care of any traffic along the quiet lanes. There are two stiles near the start of the walk, although these can be avoided by taking a small detour along a quiet lane. The other obstacles are a number of single gates plus two footbridges (which have a couple of steps up to them). You will be sharing most of the route with sheep so take care with dogs. The section of high moor is managed to protect ground nesting birds so dogs must be kept on a short, fixed lead along the public footpath on this outward stretch. There are public toilets within the Heritage Centre at the start of the walk and a cafe, The Hemmel Cafe, behind the centre. Approximate time 2.5 to 3 hours.
Druridge Bay Country Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.291508,-1.573161 A 2 mile circular walk around Ladyburn Lake within Druridge Bay Country Park in Northumberland. The park comprises three miles of beautiful beach and sand dunes, plus a large freshwater lake surrounded by woods and meadows. This route follows a simple circuit around the lake, but you could extend the route by adding a stretch along the beach should you wish. The walk follows a fairly wide surfaced path for the entire length. There are no steps or stiles, just a couple of footbridges and single gates to negotiate. The walk would be suitable for pushchairs or wheelchairs as there are just a few gentle slopes. Dogs are welcome in the park (and beach) and dog bins are provided. Dogs need to be on a lead for just a short stretch through the nature protection area. The surfaced path crosses one field which is occasionally used to graze cattle. The visitor centre at the start point has toilets and an information area which are open daily from 9.30am to 4.30pm. The cafe, shop and display rooms are open from 11.00am to 4.00pm between April and September at weekends, on Bank Holidays and during the school summer holidays. Approximate time 45 to 60 minutes.
Leasowes Park and Coombeswood Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.45368053,-2.0375239 This is a 3 mile walk around the Coombes Wood area, following the canal, which then heads through Leasowes Wood and around the springs and pools there. The trail commences at the car park in Leasowes Park, heads across Mucklow Hill and along a track that parallels the canal, before heading up the hill to offer some views of the local area. It then descends gently back across Mucklow Hill, before entering Leasowes Wood and following a trail that explores the springs and ponds that have been created there. Allow an hour to an hour and a half for the walk. The Dudley canal was opened in 1779, connecting the Stourbridge and Birmingham canals. Hawne Basin, which can be seen on the other side of the canal was originally an interchange with the Great Western Railway. It is now a marina. Leasowes Park is Grade I listed and covers 58 hectares. A natural spring, passed during the later stages of the walk, runs through iron rich rocks and leaves a striking bright orange deposit behind. William Shenstone took over the site from his father in 1742 and engaged in extensive landscaping, creating the pools that are seen here today. The walk takes place on a variety of surfaces - some of it tarmac, some of it through grassland. Small sections of it are likely to be muddy in wet weather, and some sections are pretty overgrown. There are a few gates and stiles, however these are not always in a good state of repair. A very short section of the walk takes place across the fairway of a golf course, so please take care here. There are information displays, disabled toilets and baby changing facilities at the rangers office. The car park is locked at night.
Aylesbury Arm Circular Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.820073,-0.778886 This circular walk starts and ends with long stretches of the Aylesbury Arm off the Grand Union Canal. Originally one of many spurs off the main arterial trunk of the then Grand Junction Canal, the Aylesbury Arm was opened in 1815 and is just over six miles long, linking Marsworth outside Tring to the centre of Aylesbury. The stroll along the towpath is bookended by two of the Arm's 16 locks, with the Arm unusual in being a narrow canal, whereas the Grand Union is broad, thereby restricting the size of boat that can use it. The route detours away from the canal after half way, to follow an arc following mainly bridleways, although the path can get rather overgrown in the summer months, including the walker's enemy, stinging nettles, so best not to wear shorts! There's also a short dip away from the canal at the start to take you past the Oak Farm Rare Breeds Park (01296 415709), which also offers refreshments. There is one short section of road walking without pavements and a few stiles to negotiate. Otherwise, this is a fairly flat and straightforward walk, combining footpath with towpath. Two hours should be more than enough to complete it.
Explore Surrey: Reigate Mills and Pillboxes Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.240221,-0.221745 A 4 mile (6.5km) enjoyable circular walk from Reigate Heath, passing Reigate Heath windmill, Wonham Mill and pillboxes built during the Second World War. There are good views along the walk to the North Downs. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk includes a few gentle gradients. The paths and tracks are mostly unmade and can be very muddy in part. Walking shoes or boots are required and wellingtons with grips are recommended for the winter months. You will need to negotiate a number of gates/kissing gates plus 6 stiles (all of which have open fencing surrounds which should be suitable for most dogs to pass through). You will be sharing some of the fields with horses and some of the paths have electric fencing alongside so take particular care with children and dogs. The walk crosses a golf course so please show respect for the golfers by allowing them to play their shots before you cross and watch closely for any stray flying golf balls. Allow 2 hours. If you are looking for refreshments, The Skimmington Castle pub is near waypoint 1, and The Black Horse pub is on the A25 near the bus stop at the start of the walk. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Berwick-upon-Tweed Coast and Walls Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 55.769136,-1.992813 A 3 mile circular walk from the northernmost town in England, Berwick-upon-Tweed. The walk takes in a short stretch of the beautiful coast before circling the town via the town walls and Elizabethan ramparts, some of the best remaining examples of their type in the country. There is an opportunity for a paddle on the sandy beaches plus chance to explore some of the galleries and museums within the town. The majority of the walk follows paved paths, with just a short section along the grass coastal path. The route is relatively flat with just some short slopes and there are no steps or stiles, just a few simple gates, so it would be possible to complete with a pushchair. The coastal path follows the edge of a golf course so take care and keep your eyes peeled for any stray flying golf balls. Dogs are welcome on the town walls and bins are located along the way so that you can clear up after them. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Wheelwrights Arms Dinton and Hurst Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.438572,-0.869441 A 5 mile circular pub walk from the Wheelwrights Arms near Hurst, Berkshire. The Wheelwrights is a regular in the CAMRA good beer guide and holds the cask marque so there are always plenty of good ales to choose from. The walk explores the lakes within the adjacent Dinton Pastures before striking out across local footpaths and lanes. The walk is relatively flat. The paths can get quite muddy and sometimes a little overgrown in places. You will need to negotiate five stiles along the way. There are a few sections of road walking on roads without pavements so take care of traffic at these points. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Horsey: Windmills, Dunes and Seals Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.742542,1.638126 This is a circular walk that offers both Broads walking and a stretch of the coast, where there is the special treat of an opportunity to spot some seals – if you are lucky! The walk ends with a run along an old drain, but don't worry, it's not the unpleasant kind, just another word for a man-made ditch. Allow around two hours to complete. As if this wasn't enough, the walk starts at Horsey Mill, a drainage mill once driven by windpower. The mill has been through the mill as it were, having continued to work until 1943 when it was struck by lightning and has recently had to undergo further restoration when it lost its fantail in the storms of 1987. Another, unrestored, mill is also seen on the walk. Wind power of a more modern kind can be seen on the coast in the form of a set of turbines out to sea. Finally, if you have time, take advantage of the Wildlife Boat Trips on the Lady Ann, a classic wooden boat, which goes out onto Horsey Mere, which is a SSSI (call 07791 526440 to book). These last an hour and are well worth it. There is also a tea room and public toilets by the windmill.
Broad Walks and Boardwalks Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.671143,1.506896 This is a circular walk that invests a little time upfront to get to the end of Upton Dyke, after which you follow a number of different waterways. The Broads tend not to be too walker-friendly as much of the land around them still tends to be in private hands, with few footpaths. This is therefore a rare chance to do a decent circular walk involving those that do exist. If you are used to canal walking the Broads are different, somewhere between a canal and a river, with the waters actually tidal. They lack towpaths as craft traditionally used sail not horsepower, which means you can sometimes find yourself trudging through quite high grass, albeit usually on top of banked flood defences. The walking also tends to be quieter, due to less powered craft, and it is also much more open. Rapid reed growth also means the waters' edge can often disappear from view, although it usually pops back eventually! Allow around three hours for the walk. There are facilities in the nearby village, or head for the Fairhaven Gardens where there are toilets and a café, as well as the gardens themselves.
Winterton and its Dunes Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.717631,1.698011 This is a circular walk of two halves, with the first half taking you along solid tracks through houses and along rural landscapes, whilst the second half, by way of contrast, takes you through the Winterton Dunes Nature Reserve, where you have the option of either staying on the path, keeping away from the dunes, or following one of the various tracks amongst the dunes to enjoy the scenery and wildlife. This is a Nature Reserve though, and a word of warning, you may spot adders, which are, of course, a protected species. If you start at the car park take a quick glance out to sea to spot the Blood Hill wind turbines. These were amongst the first to be installed in this country and have been operating for over twenty years. Allow at least a couple of hours for the walk. There are toilets and a café at the car park.
Dilham and its Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.777356,1.456191 The North Walsham and Dilham Canal has been called Norfolk's only canal, although it is in fact a ‘canalised' section of the River Ant, or a Navigation. It did, however, have locks; slightly wider than canal locks in order to accommodate Norfolk Wherries, and the ruins of one of these locks can be seen on this circular walk. Although technically a disused canal, you can still see boats on the water, notably at the start in Dilham, which is in fact the limit of navigation. This is a flat and relatively easy walk focusing on the canal, but it can get muddy, so good strong walking footwear is recommended. Although the majority of the walk follows the canal this does not preclude a variety of habitats, ranging from open grazing land to woodland. There is also a short stretch along the Weavers Way, one of many long distance paths criss-crossing East Anglia, although the section along this path does end in a steep climb up a bank. It's not as bad as it may look, but anyone whose knees aren't what they used to be may wish to bear this in mind. You will be sharing some of the paths with grazing livestock. There are gates, narrow footbridges and stiles along the way. All in all, allow around two hours to complete the walk.
Potter Heigham: A Bridge Too Far Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.711288,1.581132 Potter Heigham is probably second only to Wroxham as a centre for the boat hire trade in these parts. As such, it tends to be busy with boaters and people who come just to dream about being boaters one day. The village is also significant for its medieval bridge, believed to date back to 1385, which is notable for its narrow span and effectively acts as a barrier for larger craft, and as such is a significant demarcation point in the Broads. Navigation is possible for smaller craft, but is best at low water and only with the help of resident pilots – who expect to be paid! This circular walk follows a section of river and dyke, and towards the end offers the chance to do some bird watching from a hide out over one of the Broad's larger expanses of water. As such, it is highly recommended that you bring a pair of binoculars with you. The walk also follows a section of the Weavers Way long distance path linking Great Yarmouth with Cromer. Allow a couple of hours for the walk, plus twitching time.
Calver and Deep Rake Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.268819,-1.643571 A gradual climb up to Deep Rake, then a short walk across open moorland, followed by a steep descent which is rocky under foot in places. You then follow the surfaced track down Coombs Dale to reach the A623 which you follow back to Calver. You will need to negotiate several stiles along the way.
Pattingham Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.59011321,-2.26189651 This is a 6 mile circular walk from Pattingham, Staffordshire. It starts in Pattingham village, follows roads for a short distance before heading past fields and woodland. The walk offers lots of views of the surrounding countryside and Wolverhampton can be seen on a clear day. It is quite popular with dog walkers and twitchers. The walk is quite flat with very shallow gradients. There are half a dozen stiles to navigate, but some can be avoided. The roads are mainly quiet, but some are lacking in pavements, so take care. Some parts are likely to be muddy/overgrown. Allow a couple of hours for the walk, which is quite easily to follow. There is a small precinct of shops at the start of the walk.
Alsop En Le Dale, Lode Mill and the Tissington Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.091375,-1.7687929 This is a pleasant walk from the former Alsop Station on the Tissington Trail down to the River Dove at Lode Mill. Then a stroll along the river bank, followed by an ascent of one of Derbyshire's less well known dales to re-join the Tissington Trail and return to Alsop Station. On this walk you will encounter several squeezer stiles and gates and one steady uneven climb, some sections can be overgrown with nettles. Picnic tables are sited near the car park. I used OS Map: Explorer OL24 White Peak Area 1:25000.
Dudley No 2 Canal: Section 2 Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.49555,-2.065519 This is a 6 mile 'there and back' walk along a section of the Dudley No 2 Canal from Bumble Hole to Coombswood Bridge, near Hawne Basin. The walk follows well maintained paths and towpaths and takes you along the second half of the Dudley No 2 canal route. As with the first half (which is published as a separate walk on iFootpath), there are several information signs detailing the history of the area along the way. As this is the Black Country, some sections of the route are more heavily developed than others. However, there is a lot of wildlife to see. You may wish to spend a little time exploring Windmill End, including a visit to the visitors centre. However, it's run by volunteers and opening times vary. Mornings are generally your best bet. Alternatively, call on 01384 814100 to check opening times.
Packwood House and St Giles' Church Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.348894,-1.746182 An easy circular walk around Packwood House estate and the surrounding countryside, going through the park, past the moated Packwood Hall (private) and up to the pretty St Giles' Church. On this walk you will encounter some slightly uneven sections, some steps, kissing gates and stiles. The field paths may be boggy following wet weather and could be overgrown at certain times of the year. Toilets and refreshments are available at the visitor centre of Packwood House. The car park has gates which are locked at 5:30pm in the summer but earlier in the winter.
Brimpton and the River Enborne Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.378714,-1.200193 A 3 mile circular walk from the small village of Brimpton in Berkshire. The walking route takes in lovely peaceful stretches of open crop fields with lovely views across the valley and also follows a meandering section of the idyllic River Enborne. The walk has just a few gentle slopes and the paths are all a good width, with even the field-edge paths having dedicated grass tracks. There is one stile to negotiate (with a very large gap alongside for dogs) and a few single gates. The paths (particularly alongside the river) can get very muddy after periods of rain and in winter. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Staff and Worcs Canal: Aldersley Junction to The Bratch Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.60673511,-2.14838611 This is a 6 mile linear walk along a section of the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal. It commences at Aldersley junction, where the Staff and Worcs and Birmingham Old Main Line canals meet and heads through quiet countryside to The Bratch, a staircase of locks near Wombourne. The walk itself is along a canal towpath and offers views of the surrounding countryside and of the canal, which is often reasonably busy with boat traffic. The footpath is a well maintained gravel path for the most part and would also be suitable for cyclists. However, there are several low bridges that you will need to take care while going under. There are no stiles. There is a café available near to the end of the walk. See therailwaycafe.vpweb.co.uk for opening times.
Backbury Hill and Mordiford Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.043685,-2.616667 A 4 mile circular walk around the northern part of the Wye Valley taking in Backbury Hill, the pretty Pentaloe Brook and the village of Mordiford. A beautifully varied route with sections of woodland, pastures, village lanes, meadows and old tracks, you will be rewarded with glorious views throughout. Mordiford is best known for the legend of its dragon which was said to drink from the confluence of the Rivers Lugg and Wye and you will see a dragon symbol on many of the waymarks along the way. The route has several climbs and descents throughout including one fairly steep ascent. The paths can be very muddy after periods of rain and can be overgrown in summer so good boots and long trousers are a must. You will need to negotiate six stiles, some of which are fairly tall for humans but all of which have gaps underneath that medium dogs should be able to pass through. There are also several gates along the way and one flight of steps. Whilst the majority of the paths are through woodland or along enclosed tracks, you will need to pass through some pastures which may be holding sheep and/or cattle. You will also be sharing the paths with lots of game birds. Approximate time 2 hours.
Powis Castle and the Montgomery Canal Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.658693,-3.149289 IMPORTANT NOTE: Dogs are not permitted on this walk as the route crosses a private deer park. A 4.5 mile circular walk from the town of Welshpool in Powys. The route climbs through a medieval deer park to visit the beautiful red sandstone Powis Castle then crosses pastures to join the towpath of the Montgomery Canal for the return leg back into town. There are glorious views and plenty of wildlife to enjoy. The walk includes several steady climbs/descents for the first half and then is almost entirely flat for the second half. The majority of the route follows tarmac tracks and surfaced towpaths, but you will need to cross a few pastures which can be fairly muddy after periods of rain. You will be sharing some of the paths with deer, sheep and cattle. There are three stiles on the route plus several gates. The walk crosses the private deer park of Powis Castle which is open from dawn to sunset, but DOGS ARE NOT PERMITTED at any time. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Capler Wood and the River Wye Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.978306,-2.606898 A 2.5 mile circular walk through the woodland slopes alongside the River Wye in Herefordshire. The ancient woodland slopes are a blaze of colour with wild flowers in the spring and the beautiful River Wye is host to lots of wildlife. The walk follows a mixture of quiet country lanes (take care of the traffic on these) plus woodland/grass tracks alongside the river which can get fairly muddy after periods of rain. All of the paths are a good width and there are no stiles, gates or steps on the route. There is one long fairly steep descent along a road and a steep ascent up a stone track at the end of the walk. There are no toilet or refreshment facilities nearby, but you could bring a picnic. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Hay-on-Wye River and Rail Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.072649,-3.126144 A 2 mile circular walk from the town of Hay-on-Wye in Powys. The route leaves the town to follow a pretty path alongside the River Wye, before returning along a stretch of the former mid-Wales railway. There is lots of wildlife to enjoy along the way, chance for a paddle in the River Wye and a great opportunity to explore the narrow streets of the town which are dotted with bookshops, cafes and antique shops. The route is relatively flat, with just one steady climb up into the town towards the end. The walk follows a mixture of tarmac pavements, a stone old rail track and a grass riverside path which can get muddy after periods of rain. You will need to negotiate 3 kissing gates along the way. Sheep are sometimes grazed on The Warren so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1 hour.
Titley Village and Mortimer Country Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.234714,-2.980611 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the small village of Titley in Herefordshire. The route performs a simple loop through the surrounding countryside taking in hillside pastures, ancient lanes and open crop fields. There are wonderful views from the top of the hillside pastures as you enjoy this journey through the southern part of Mortimer Country, the former stomping ground of the powerful medieval Marcher Lords. The walk includes several long but steady climbs and descents. The field paths can be very muddy after periods of rain and can also get quite overgrown so good boots and long trousers are a must. You will need to negotiate two stiles (both with adjacent dog gates) plus a number of gates and kissing gates (some of which are a tight squeeze). You will be sharing the pastures with sheep and sometimes cattle so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Almshill Wood and Stonor Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.589221,-0.940156 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the small village of Stonor (formerly known as Upper Assendon) in Oxfordshire. The walk climbs through the pretty Almshill Wood and then follows a quiet country lane to reach the Stonor Estate. The return leg follows the path through the heart of Stonor Park, a beautiful deer park, to return to the village. You will have chance to enjoy lovely views across the surrounding Chiltern Hills, to appreciate the woodland flowers in the spring and to learn about the fascinating history of Stonor House. The walk has one very steep climb at the beginning and then a long steady descent for the second half. About 1.5 miles of the walk follows a quiet country access lane so take care of any occasional traffic on this stretch. You will need to negotiate two stiles (both with large gaps underneath for dogs to pass through) plus three kissing gates. There may be cattle in the first short field that you cross (although there weren't any livestock there when we walked) and the return leg follows a long path through a deer park. For your own safety it is sensible to avoid taking dogs through deer parks during the rutting and birthing seasons. The woodland/park paths are fairly firm but can get muddy in winter and after periods of rain. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Hardwick Hall Estate Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.1716336492386,-1.32376670837402 A walk around Hardwick Hall estate. Hardwick Hall was built between 1590 and 1597 and was the home of Bess of Hardwick, Countess of Shrewsbury and ancestress of the Dukes of Devonshire. The extensive grounds also contain Hardwick Old Hall, a slightly earlier house which was used as guest and service accommodation after the new hall was built. The Old Hall is now a ruin. Hardwick estate, which surrounds the magnificent hall, covers around 2,500 acres of parkland, woodland, wetland and farmland. You will see several sculptures in the lower park. The National Trust became the owner in 1959,and a charge applies if you wish to visit the house and gardens. On this walk you will encounter several gates, a fairly steep up hill section and a steep down hill section. The made paths are of good quality (but could have puddles after wet weather) whilst the grass paths are well defined and easy to follow. The woodland paths can get fairly muddy after rain and in winter. Public toilets are available in the car park which also has a coffee/tea machine, further toilets are available in the visitor centre which also has a café and gift shop. The walk takes approximately 2 hours to complete.
Staff and Worcs Canal: The Bratch to Stourton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.54315897,-2.19224259 This is a 7 mile linear walk along a section of the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal. It commences at The Bratch, a staircase of locks near Wombourne and heads through quiet countryside to Stourton, between Stourbridge and Kinver. The walk itself is along a canal towpath and offers views of the surrounding countryside and of the canal, which is often reasonably busy with boat traffic. The footpath is a well maintained gravel path for the most part and would also be suitable for cyclists. However, there are several low bridges that you will need to take care of while going under and there is a flight of about 15 steps at Swindon Lock. There are no stiles.
Devil's Dyke and Poynings Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.884401,-0.212504 Hi, I'm Dulcie and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk. It's a 3 mile circular walk taking in Devil's Dyke, the South Downs Way and the small village of Poynings. There are stunning panoramic views as you explore the longest, deepest and widest dry valley in the UK. To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. The paths are firm for the most part but the sections through woodland can be very muddy after rain and in winter. The final stretch of path follows a narrow exposed ridge path with a steep drop to the side (not for the faint-hearted), so take particular care with children. The walk includes one long, steady descent and one long ascent via a very steep flight of steps set into the woodland. You will need to negotiate four stiles (all with dog-gates or open fencing alongside) plus some gates. The chalk downs are sometimes used for grazing sheep or cattle to help with conservation so take care with dogs. There are toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Slaugham and Old Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.038605,-0.208192 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the small pretty village of Slaugham (pronounced Slafam) in West Sussex. The route takes in the peaceful rolling countryside including an impressive old mill pond. There are great views throughout and a chance to visit the grave of the sister of Admiral Horatio Nelson. The walk has a number of steady climbs and descents throughout. There is about one mile of walking along a quiet country lane and you will need to negotiate three stiles (all with dog-sized gaps underneath) and some kissing gates. The paths across the open fields and meadows can be quite muddy after rain and in winter. Old Park Farm is currently deserted (correct August 2014) and so the fields are deserted meadows with no livestock or crops to negotiate. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Alstonefield, Wetton and Hope Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.097283,-1.805121 This is a varied walk through pretty villages and field paths with great views down the Manifold Valley. Alstonefield is a small village in the Peak District National Park, in an area known as the White Peak. The village lies on the borders of Derbyshire and Staffordshire between the valleys of the Dove and the Manifold rivers. The village is centred around the village green which is triangular in shape. The village has a church, pub, old water pump and well. The village was once a busy junction of packhorse routes and was granted a market charter in 1308 but farming was the predominant occupation in the parish for centuries. Some sections could be very muddy after wet weather and some areas can be overgrown with nettles. You will pass through and over many stiles (including squeeze stiles and wall stiles) and so I would not recommend this as a dog friendly walk. Livestock could be present in some of the farm fields. Public toilets are situated in Alstonefield and Wetton. The relevant OS Map is OL24 The Peak District White Peak. The walk takes around 3 hours to complete.
Gibbet Hill and Hindhead Common Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.114745,-0.728522 A 3 mile circular walk from the Devil's Punch Bowl in Surrey, taking in Gibbet Hill and Hindhead Common. There are spectacular views into the Punch Bowl and across the Surrey Hills as well as chance to glimpse the resident ponies and discover some chilling history. The walk has long but steady climbs and descents throughout and the paths can become very muddy in the winter and after periods of rain. There are no stiles along the way, just a number of kissing gates and steps. The common is grazed by wild ponies and Highland Cattle so take care with dogs. There is a cafe and toilets by the car park at the start. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Bronte Waterfalls Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.822872,-1.973034 A 4 mile circular walk taking in Penistone Hill Country Park, the Bronte Waterfall, Bronte Bridge and the village of Stanbury. The walk is along fairly well defined paths across moorland with carpets of heather covering the hillsides. Whilst most of the route is along good paths there are sections near Bronte Waterfall which are down rocky steps which together with several kissing gates make the walk unsuitable for pushchairs. The moors are used for grazing sheep making it important to keep dogs under control.
Birmingham Old Main Line Canal: Wolverhampton to Tipton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.58870069,-2.12260756 This is a 6 mile linear walk from Wolverhampton to Tipton. It follows the route of the Old Main Line canal and comprises of two junctions, two tunnels and several points of interest. Some parts of the route are urbanised while others are more rural. The walk commences in Wolverhampton and concludes in Tipton, both of which offer various shops. The walk takes place along well maintained towpaths for the most part, but there is some road walking involved. A torch is also highly recommended as the tunnels are unlit. Allow 2-2.5 hours to complete. There are some reasonably steep inclines and also a short flight of about a dozen steps. There are a few radar key scheme gates, and as early parts of the route form part of the Birmingham and Black Country Cycleway (route 81), there will often be cyclists.
Shropshire Union Canal: Brewood to Autherley Junction Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.67734012,-2.17860251 This is a 5 mile linear walk along a section of the Shropshire Union Canal. It commences at Brewood (locally pronounced "brood") and heads through quiet countryside, which gradually becomes more urbanised, to Autherley Junction, where the Shropshire Union meets the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal. The walk itself is along a canal towpath and offers views of the surrounding countryside and of the canal, which is often reasonably busy with boat traffic, especially in summer. There is a flight of 15 steps at the start of the walk. The footpath is quite muddy for a couple of miles at the start of the walk, as the canal goes through a cutting, and can be overgrown later on. It becomes more maintained after Bridge 6. The route would likely also be suitable for cyclists. However, there are several low bridges that you will need to take care while going under. There are no stiles, however there is a radar key scheme gate near to Bridge 4. There are a few shops and a pub in Brewood, but most of the route is well away from urban areas.
The Moat House Teddesley Park and Canal Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.756544,-2.096554 A 4.5 mile circular trail from The Moat House in Acton Trussell in Staffordshire. The Moat House is a 14th century moated manor house which today houses an award winning pub, restaurant and hotel where you can be assured of a warm, friendly welcome. The walking route explores the adjacent rolling countryside taking in the farmland, local villages, Teddesley Park and a stretch of the pretty Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal. You will have chance to see 1,000 year old oak trees plus a former home of JRR Tolkien which later featured in his writings. The walking route has a few steady gradients and follows a mixture of field and woodland paths which can get quite muddy after rain and in winter. There are a couple of stretches of road walking, including one section along the edge of a fairly busy road, so take particular care of traffic at these points. You will need to negotiate gates, footbridges and six stiles, some of which are entirely enclosed with wire fencing so dogs will need a lift over. You are likely to come across sheep in most of the fields and maybe cattle in one field, so take particular care with dogs. Approximate time 2 hours.
In the pawsteps of Winnie-the-Pooh Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.064385,0.092782 A 5.5 mile circular trail around Ashdown Forest, the setting for the Winnie-the-Pooh stories written by AA Milne. The route gives you chance to immerse yourself in the world of Pooh and his friends. Play Poohsticks at Pooh Bridge, explore the 100 Aker Wood and visit Eeyore's Gloomy Place. For those less interested in the Pooh connection (shame on you!) there is lots more on offer. Ashdown Forest's origins lie as a medieval hunting forest, created soon after the Norman conquest, and today its 9.5 square miles are the largest area of open access land in the south east. You will pass through beautiful beech woodland and vast areas of ancient open heath where you will be rewarded with glorious views of the surrounding High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The walk includes several steady but long climbs and descents throughout. The paths, whilst mainly firm, can run with water and be quite muddy in part after periods of rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate a couple of gates plus two stiles (both of which have gaps underneath that should be suitable for most dogs to pass under). You will pass-by some sheep grazing areas and horse paddocks which are fenced with electric fencing so take care with children and dogs at these points. The forest is home to a large deer population and the heath supports ground nesting birds so dogs need to be kept under close control. There are no toilets or other facilities on route. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
Lupton Park Farm, Maypool and Galmpton Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.382273,-3.55978 A very pleasant rural walk with glimpses of the Torbay Coastline as well as the River Dart. About an hour's walk at a moderate pace. Suitable for dogs who can be allowed off their leads along the bridle path sections. Across fields, dogs should be on leads if there are livestock. Same for the road section: although this is a country lane, it is also the main route to Greenway House (Agatha Christie's home) which is popular with tourists and therefore the lane can be busy. Most gradients are gentle and the road section is reasonably flat. However, there is one steeper section on the way back, thus increasing the difficulty rating to two "boots". Baby buggies with small wheels will find some bits troublesome. Larger wheeled/"all terrain" buggies should be OK (so long as the person pushing is reasonably fit and healthy). Fans of steam railways may be rewarded with the sight of trains passing along the Paignton to Dartmouth Steam railway.
The Dog and Doublet Sandon Park and Canal Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.860561,-2.078672 A 6.5 mile circular pub walk from the Dog and Doublet in Sandon, Staffordshire. The Dog and Doublet is a charming yet stylish gastro inn, providing a warm and friendly ambiance. The walking route explores the adjacent Sandon Park, with magnificent views from the open expanse of parkland, before returning along a peaceful stretch of the Trent and Mersey Canal. The route has several climbs/descents and follows a mixture of field, parkland and woodland paths which can get quite muddy after rain and in winter. There are a couple of stretches of road walking, including one section along the edge of a fairly busy road and two busy road crossings, so take particular care of traffic at these points. The paths through the parkland are not particularly well-signed so navigation can prove quite tricky. As such, it will be easiest to follow this route on the Android or iPhone App, where you can use the live GPS map to guide you. You will need to negotiate gates, footbridges, steps and 13 stiles, most of which are tall and entirely enclosed with wire fencing so dogs will need a lift over. You are likely to come across sheep/horses in most of the fields and cattle in one field, so take particular care with dogs. Approximate time 3 hours.
Brownstone, Froward Point and Coast Path Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.348665,-3.541113 A delightful, yet in places steep and rugged, walk taking in Dartmouth "day mark", the Coastguard Lookout Point (including the disused WW2 gun batteries) and a fairly demanding stretch along the South West Coast Path before returning uphill across fields to the starting point. Dogs can roam free for much of this walk, however, across the fields (the final section of the walk) there are warnings that livestock are present and dogs should be kept under control. Sections of this walk have steep drops down to the rocks and sea below. Whilst these are not sheer cliffs (at least not right next to the path) a fall from here could result in life changing injuries (or worse) and young children should be closely supervised. Due to the steepness of parts of this walk, although it totals just three miles, it will feel longer. Allow a couple of hours to take your time and enjoy the views! Note of caution - when we tracked this walk, the gate at Waypoint 8 ("Stile") was locked with a chain and padlock. This meant lifting our 40 kilo dog over the stile to continue the walk. If your dog is agile enough to scramble a stile (with or without assistance) then this should not be a problem. But we thought we should let you know!
Galmpton Creek to Greenway Gardens Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.390545,-3.577235 A coastal circular walk taking in woodland and the gardens of Greenway - Agatha Christie's house. Dogs can be off lead for much of this walk, although please exercise care when crossing or walking along the road section as this can be busy with tourist traffic. (We had our dogs on leads for these bits.) The beach section at the beginning of this walk is tidal, so on very high tides you may have to keep right to the edge of the beach (or even paddle) for a short distance. It may be worth checking the tide times to avoid this. There are a couple of stiles on this route which dogs may find difficult to negotiate. Our 40 kilo Boxer only just managed to squeeze under the first stile - and would have found it difficult to climb over. Smaller dogs should be fine. This is a fairly easy walk, although there are sections which would be difficult for those who are a little unsteady on their feet.
Birmingham Old Main Line Canal: Tipton to Titford Canal & Titford Pools Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.52856818,-2.06987261 This is a 5 mile linear trail from Owen Street Bridge in Tipton, to Titford canal and Titford Pools in Oldbury. Allow 1.5-2 hours to complete. The trail follows the route of the Old Main Line to Oldbury Junction, before turning off and following the line of the Titford canal to Titford Pools. The route itself is along a canal towpath. There are no steps or stiles, but there are a couple of bridges to navigate. There are also several radar key scheme gates. The route starts in Tipton which has a small shopping centre and ends in Oldbury, adjacent to Birchley Crossings, J2 of the M5. The route offers views of the local area, some of which are urbanised while others are more rural. There are also historical points of interest along the route.
Birmingham Old Main Line Canal: Wolverhampton to Wednesbury Oak Loop Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.58870069,-2.12260756 This is a 5 mile linear walk from Wolverhampton to Bradley. It follows the route of the Old Main Line canal before turning onto the Wednesbury Oak Loop canal and comprises of two junctions, a tunnel and several points of interest. Some parts of the route are urbanised while others are more rural. The walk commences in Wolverhampton and ends in Bradley. Wolverhampton has most if not all amenities, while Bradley is a residential area. The walk takes place along well maintained towpaths, but note that parts may be muddy during/after wet weather. A torch is also highly recommended as the tunnel is unlit. Allow 2-2.5 hours to complete. The route is mostly flat but there are a couple of points where it will be necessary to ascend a bridge. There are a few radar key scheme gates, and as early parts of the route form part of the Birmingham and Black Country Cycleway (route 81), there will often be cyclists. The route is mostly green, with some areas offering access to local green spaces. However, as this is the Black Country, parts are quite urbanised and may be close to factories and/or housing estates. There is often a goodly amount of flora and fauna to see - keep your eyes peeled for plants like wild marjoram, flax and evening primrose and bird life like herons and Canada geese.
Staff and Worcs Canal: Stourton to Cookley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.4401753,-2.21753033 This is a 5 mile linear trail from Stourton to Cookley. Allow 1.5-2 hours to complete. The trail follows the route of the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal. The route offers views of the local area, most of which rural. There are several points of historical interest and also a short tunnel. The route itself is along a canal towpath. There is a short flight of steps and some slopes may be slippery. There are a couple of bridges and gates to navigate. The route starts in Stourton, passes by Kinver village which has several shops available and ends near to Cookley, which also has a few shops. The only toilets on the walk are in Kinver village.
Hartington, Pilsbury and Banktop Farm Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.141168,-1.8103 A varied walk starting at the pretty village of Hartington. The walk takes approximately 3 hours to complete and the appropriate Ordnance Survey map is OS 24 White Peak. Hartington is set in magnificent White Peak limestone scenery, close to the River Dove, which marks the county boundary of Derbyshire with Staffordshire and is an important tourist centre. It is an old village which has some very nice buildings arranged around a large marketplace with its own pond. The village has a cheese shop, and a variety of refreshment stops. Well Dressings are displayed in Hartington each September, this is an ancient tradition in Derbyshire where pictures are created in beds of clay using flower petals and natural materials and displayed near wells or springs to give thanks for a fresh water supply. On this walk you will encounter many stiles including squeezer and wall stiles, a steep ascent and descent and there may be livestock in some of the fields. Some sections are rocky underfoot.
Old Main Line Canal to Walsall Canal: Tipton to Gospel Oak Junction Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.53028052,-2.06612336 This is a 5 mile linear trail from Owen Street Bridge in Tipton, to Gospel Oak Junction on the Walsall Canal, in Wednesbury. Allow 1.5-2 hours to complete. The trail follows the route of the Old Main Line to Pudding Green Junction, before turning left and following the line of the Walsall Canal to Gospel Oak Junction. The route itself is along a canal towpath. There are no steps or stiles, but there are a couple of bridges to navigate. There are also several radar key scheme gates. The route starts in Tipton which has a small shopping centre and ends near to Wednesbury. The route offers views of the local area, some of which are urbanised while others are more rural. There are several canal junctions along the route and points of historical interest.
Throwley Hall, Soles Hollow and Manifold Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.085377,-1.852236 A beautiful circular trail following field paths, farm tracks and the Manifold Valley Trail. The first half of the walk is mainly a gradual uphill climb which rewards you with fine views. On reaching Slade House it is downhill all the way with a steep rocky section down the dale of Soles Hollow. On the walk you will pass through several gates and stiles including wall, squeeze, gated and ladder types. Some sections could be muddy and livestock could be present in some of the fields. Public toilets and refreshments are located in the village of Wetton. You will pass an old lime kiln and the old historic Throwley Hall. Throwley Hall belonged to the Meverell family from 1203 to the mid 17th century and the manor house was built in 1603 for Simon Meverell. Sadly it is now only a ruin and is currently in the care of English Heritage. On the walk you will cross the Rivers Hamps and Manifold. The River Manifold disappears underground from Wetton Mill (except in very wet weather) and does not reappear until it reaches the grounds of Ilam Hall, a distance of four miles. The Manifold's only tributary, the River Hamps, also flows underground through a series of caves and passages.
Puttenham Common and the North Downs Way Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.204078,-0.695811 A 3.5 mile circular walk around Puttenham Common in Surrey. The common comprises mixed woodland, grassland and heathland and is home to lots of birds, butterflies, reptiles and dragonflies which reside in the ponds, heather, grasses, silver birch, oaks and pines. The area is a popular spot with families and dog walkers but you will still be able to enjoy the peace within the expansive common and your climbs will be rewarded with fabulous views. The walk has several long but very steady climbs and descents. There are no gates or stiles on route, just a short flight of steps to negotiate. The woodland paths can be very muddy after rain and the heath paths become very narrow in part. You will be sharing some of the bridleways with horse riders so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Littlewick Green and Maidenhead Thicket Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.512747,-0.79257 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the small village of Littlewick Green, near Maidenhead in Berkshire. The simple circular route explores the local arable fields, with expansive views, before entering Maidenhead Thicket and the Stubbings Estate. Walk in the footsteps of song writers, highwayman and Iron Age farmers as you explore this pretty corner of Berkshire. The route is almost entirely flat with just some gentle slopes. Many of the paths are firm and well-made, but the woodland paths can be very muddy in winter and after rain. The paths are all wide and there are no stiles or steps on route, just a couple of very generous kissing gates. All the fields are arable so you won't need to walk through any livestock. You will need to cross the A4 a couple of times and there are a couple of sections of walking along country lanes, so take care of traffic at these points. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Bucklebury and the Pang Valley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.434207,-1.207168 A 3 mile circular walk from the small village of Bucklebury in Berkshire. The walking route climbs through fields and alongside a pretty stream up to Sadgrove Farm, before turning back downhill where you are rewarded with views across the Pang Valley. You will have chance to glimpse some of the vast array of animals within Bucklebury Farm Park, including goats, donkeys, alpacas and wild boar. (Note: Please read the safety/access notes below about the farm park, particularly if you intend to take a dog with you). The walk is one gentle climb followed by the equivalent descent, but there are no particularly steep sections. The paths pass through woodlands and fields and so can be very muddy after periods of rain and in wet weather. There are two stiles on route (both of which are usually avoidable with open gates alongside) plus a couple of kissing gates. You will pass through a few fields holding sheep. The final leg of the walk follows the public footpath which passes through Bucklebury Farm Park. This will lead you through a field of Dexter Cattle (a small black breed) and the official line of the footpath also crosses enclosures holding other park animals (such as alpacas, llamas, donkeys and exotic deer). We strongly recommend you follow our instructions to avoid these enclosures, and if you have a dog with you please show respect for the park's animals by keeping the dog close to you on a short lead and walking quickly and quietly through the park. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
The Garrison Loop and High Lanes Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 49.914618,-6.31613 A small archipelago 28 miles southwest of Lands End are the Isles of Scilly. They consist 5 inhabited and 51 uninhabited islands. The largest of the inhabited islands is St Mary's which is where this walk is located. The walk begins with an optional loop around The Garrison, home to the Elizabethan Fort the Star Castle, now a hotel. The High Lanes section of the walk takes in number of St Mary's hostelries including Juliet's with its fabulous terrace overlooking Hugh Town and the harbour and also the Kaffehaus in High Lanes, a slice of Bavaria in the middle of St Mary's.
Errwood Reservoir, Shining Tor and Errwood Hall Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.277987,-1.98132 The beautiful Goyt Valley lies in the Peak District National Park on the Cheshire/Derbyshire border close to the towns of Macclesfield and Buxton. It contains some stunning scenery, including high moorland, gritstone edges and Fernilee and Errwood reservoirs. The western side of the valley is flanked by Shining Tor, which rises to a height of 1,833 feet and has great views, on a clear day you can see Jodrell Bank in Cheshire and further to the welsh hills.This walk takes in several features including the ruins of the old Errwood Hall and its surrounding estate. This vast estate with its varying landscapes were created and owned by the wealthy Grimshawe Family,it was built for Samuel Grimshawe a wealthy Manchester businessman. The Hall was built in 1840 - 41. Samuel Grimshawe's grandchildren were the last members of the family to live at the hall, which was later demolished in connection with the construction of the Fernilee reservoir in 1934. Stones from the demolished hall were used to construct the water treatment works below the reservoir.The surrounding woodlands are bursting with the colours of the Yellow Azaleaa and Purple Rhododendron shrubs which the Grimshawes brought back from their many travels and the best time to see these in flower is April-early June. The first part of the walk is a long steady uphill climb but then becomes mostly downhill from Shinning Tor. Some sections could be boggy and the grassy downhill sections could be slippery after wet weather. You will pass through several gates on the route and there are also flights of steps to negotiate. The appropriate map is OL 24 White Peak. There are no public toilets in the Goyt Valley, the nearest being in the park in Buxton.
Wyrley and Essington Canal: Horseley Fields to Sneyd Junction Bridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.58674749,-2.10885846 This is a 6 mile linear trail from Horseley Fields Junction Bridge in Wolverhampton, to Sneyd Junction in Bloxwich. It follows the course of the Wyrley and Essington Canal. Allow 2-2.5 hours to complete. The route itself is along a canal towpath. There are no steps or stiles, but there are a couple of bridges to navigate. There are also several radar key scheme gates. The route starts in Wolverhampton which has all the usual amenities and ends near to Bloxwich, a busy town. There are also several shops near to the first waypoint. This route is something of a "route of two halves". It starts in a highly developed area of Wolverhampton but ends between several nature reserves. There are several canal junctions along the route and points of historical interest. There is also lots of wildlife to see, particularly at the end of the walk. Kingsfishers have been spotted between waypoints 1 and 2.
The Old Post Office Wallingford and River Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.598558,-1.123594 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Old Post Office in Wallingford, Oxfordshire. The Old Post Office pub is a warm and friendly meeting place, serving great food and drink all day. The walking route takes in some of the old treasures within the town (including the town hall, castle grounds and several churches) before following a picturesque section of the riverside path along the Thames. The walk is relatively flat throughout. Some of the field, woodland and riverside paths can get very muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are no stiles or steps on route, just some single gates and footbridges to negotiate. Whilst most of the paths are enclosed, there is one field length of the Thames Path that passes through a pasture which may be holding cattle. There are public toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Errwood, Fernilee Reservoir and Taxal Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.2775527298393,-1.98111981153488 A pleasant walk in the beautiful Goyt Valley along the banks of Fernilee Reservoir, with its mixed woodland, down to the small hamlet of Taxal and back along the valley following the River Goyt. On this walk you will need to negotiate a couple of steep descents and one steep ascent, a stile, several gates and a few flights of steps. After rain some sections through the woodland could be muddy and some field sections are boggy due to being churned by livestock. There are no toilets in the valley, the nearest are in the centre of Buxton. An ice cream van sometimes sits in the car park and picnic benches are also available in the car park area.
The Red Lion and Water End Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.781286,-0.492441 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Red Lion in Water End, Hertfordshire. The Red Lion combines comfort and style with a relaxed atmosphere in a building that dates back to the early 1700s. The walking route performs a simple loop around the surrounding Chiltern countryside, taking in open arable farmland with extensive views and the various old mills and houses along the pretty River Gade. The walk includes several steady climbs and descents throughout. The field paths can become very muddy in winter and after periods of rain. You will need to cross over the main A4146 at two points, once at the start of the walk and once half way round. The traffic can be very fast moving so take extreme care at these points and take your time to ensure you are able to cross safely. Whilst most of the land is arable farmland, you will cross one field that is likely to be holding sheep so take particular care with dogs. There are two stiles on route (both of which have wide gates alongside that are normally unlocked) plus a number of single gates to negotiate. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Stourbridge Canal: Fens Pools to Stourbridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.49752195,-2.12909212 This is a 4 mile linear walk along a few branches of the Stourbridge Canal. It commences at The Fens Pools in Pensnett and ends near to The Bonded Warehouse in Stourbridge. The walk itself is along a canal towpath and offers views of the surrounding countryside and of the canal, which is often reasonably busy with boat traffic. There are a couple of nature boards along the route detailing some of the history of the local area. There are also points of historical interest. The footpath is a well maintained tarmac path for the most part and would also be suitable for cyclists. However, there are several low bridges that you will need to take care of while going under and some slopes can be slippery during wet weather.
Upper Arley Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.41966741,-2.34938883 This is a 4 mile circular trail set in Upper Arley in Worcestershire. The walk departs Arley along the River Severn, heads past Trimpley Reservoir, crosses the line of the Severn Valley Railway, ascends a track through Eymore Woods before heading along a couple of roads and returning to the village via Arley Arboretum. The route comprises several different kinds of walking surface, including woodland paths that will be uneven and muddy. The section through Eymore Woods is of a reasonably steep gradient. There are no steps but there are several gates and a railway crossing. Stout boots are recommended. Allow 1.5-2 hours to complete. Arley is a small village, but there is a local shop and toilets are available near to the car park.
The Kings Arms Berkhamsted and Canal Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.760432,-0.563346 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Kings Arms in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire. The Kings Arms restaurant, bar and rooms provides the perfect place to eat, drink and relax in a stylish setting. The walking route takes in the highlights of historic Berkhamsted, including the town hall and castle remains, as well as exploring a pretty stretch of the Grand Union Canal. There's a short climb to reach the countryside to the north where you will be rewarded with great views over the town and may even have the chance to meet some donkeys. The route follows a mixture of pavements/towpath and field/woodland paths, the latter of which can be fairly muddy after rain and in winter. There are several steady ascents and descents throughout. You will need to negotiate some flights of steps and several kissing gates along the way. There are public toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Dogs are welcome in the castle grounds as long as they are on a lead. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Arley to Bewdley Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.4185433,-2.34383772 This is an 8 mile circular trail that follows the route of the River Severn through Worcestershire. It commences in Arley, follows a track alongside the river through woodland and fields before arriving at Bewdley. It then returns to Arley on the other side of the river, again along a track through woodland and fields. The path is well marked but is through woodland and so will have muddy patches and/or sections where some climbing over roots will be essential. There are several gates but no stiles. The walk offers views of the river and surrounding countryside, and also of a few points of historical interest. The walk starts in the small village of Upper Arley, where is a local shop and public toilets, but also visits the large town of Bewdley, where there are many more facilities and shops. You may wish to spend some time exploring both locations.
Bakewell, the Monsal Trail and Calton Pastures Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.2172635901868,-1.66852176189423 A 5 mile circular walk from Bakewell which heads out along the Monsal Trail, up over farmland on the Haddon Hall Estate, along the edge of the Chatsworth House estate and steeply down through mixed woodland back to your starting point. Bakewell has one of the oldest markets in the area, dating from at least 1300. The first recorded fair was held in 1254. Markets are still held every Monday and, unlike most of the other local centres, there is still a thriving livestock market. Bakewell has lots to offer and holds many events throughout the year including well dressings, the Bakewell Show (two days in early August), Carnival Week and an Arts Festival. Bakewell has a Museum, housed in one of the few genuinely medieval buildings of the area, it also has a variety of shops and places to eat and is famous for its Bakewell pudding. The Monsal Trail was the former London-Midland railway which linked St Pancras and Manchester,the line was completed in 1863 and closed about a century later in 1968 by the transport minister (Barbara Castle) and not as part of the notorious 'Beeching Cuts'. The building of the Original Midland Railway line was not welcomed by the Dukes of Devonshire and Rutland since it was to pass close to their Derbyshire residences (Devonshire refused to let the line be routed through Chatsworth Park and Rutland refused a line up the Wye Valley through Haddon Hall lands). Rutland compromised and the line was screened from Haddon using a tunnel. On this walk you will need to negotiate some very steep uphill sections, several gates, a couple of stiles, a very steep downhill section and a couple of flights of steps. Some sections can be muddy after wet weather and some sections are rocky underfoot. Public toilets and refreshments can be found in Bakewell centre, approximately 0.5 miles from the car park.
The Crown and Thistle Abingdon Heritage Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.670301,-1.277999 A 2 mile circular pub walk from the Crown and Thistle in Abingdon-on-Thames, Oxfordshire. The Crown and Thistle is a stunning modern interpretation of a traditional coaching inn, offering refreshments in beautiful, comfortable surroundings. The walking route explores the rich heritage of Abingdon taking in churches, the old county hall, the abbey gardens and meadows and a bustling stretch of the River Thames. The route is almost entirely flat and follows a mixture of pavements, stone paths and a grass stretch of the Thames Path, the latter of which can be a little muddy in winter/after rain. There are no stiles on route, just a few single gates and some steps. You will need to cross the weir and a lock over the river so take particular care with children and dogs here. Approximate time 1 hour.
The Akeman Tring Park and Hastoe Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.795028,-0.659097 A 4.5 mile circular pub walk from The Akeman in Tring, Hertfordshire. At the Akeman you will find an open fire, open kitchen and open arms ready to welcome you at all times of day. The walking route explores the adjacent Tring Park, one of the largest areas of unimproved chalk grassland in the country, and returns through the beautiful Stubbings Wood, a haven for wild flowers and birds. The walk follows paths through the parkland and woodland and, whilst these are fairly well made, they can get quite muddy in winter and after periods of rain. There are several climbs and descents throughout. There are no stiles on route but you will need to negotiate several steps and kissing gates. There are a couple of sections of road walking along quiet country lanes so take care of any traffic at these points. The large open grass parkland within Tring Park is used for grazing cattle so take particular care with dogs here. There are public toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Akeman Inn Kingswood Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.864098,-0.994067 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Akeman Inn in Kingswood, Buckinghamshire. The Akeman Inn is a beautiful old coaching inn, offering the perfect destination for refreshments before or after your walk. The walking route performs a simple loop around the surrounding countryside taking in large pastures, quiet lanes and old avenues with plenty of wildlife to enjoy. The walk includes a few steady slopes throughout and the paths pass through woodland and animal pastures, meaning they can become very muddy in winter and after rain. There are several kissing gates to negotiate plus nine stiles. The stiles are all tall, fully enclosed with fencing and mainly configured in pairs. Nearly all of the fields you cross are animal pastures holding mostly cattle but also horses and sheep. You will need to cross the main A41 road twice and the traffic is fairly fast moving so take particular care at these points. With all this in mind, we wouldn't recommend this walk for dogs or young children. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Bakewell, Hassop and the River Wye Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.217282,-1.668403 A 4 mile circular walk from Bakewell heading north along the Monsal Trail to Hassop Station, then along a bridle path to reach the River Wye where you follow the river's banks back to the town of Bakewell. Bakewell is an attractive market town which lies within the Peak District National Park, it has many attractive courtyards, independent shops, cafés and its location on the River Wye make it a hugely popular destination for tourists. Bakewell is best known for a confection which was originally made by mistake! In the 19th century a cook at a local inn was baking a jam tart but misunderstood the recipe and so Bakewell Pudding was created. The ancient five arched bridge leads you over the river to the town centre and upstream from this is the ancient packhorse bridge near Holme Hall, both of which we see on this walk. The town also has The Old House Museum which is located near the church, it occupies one of the oldest buildings in Bakewell and dates back to 1543. Bakewell has one of the oldest markets in the area, dating from at least 1300 and markets are still held here every Monday. On this walk you will go through several gates, over one stile and descend a couple a flights of wooden steps. Some sections of the bridle way and river side paths could be muddy after wet weather. The appropriate Map for this walk is OL 24 White Peak area.
Youlgreave and Bradford Dale Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.173267,-1.694777 An easy walk descending from the pretty village of Youlgreave to the valley in which the River Bradford flows, returning via farm land and a further section along the river. Youlgreave or Youlgrave is a quiet, peaceful village, now mainly devoted to farming, but was once one of the centres of the Derbyshire lead-mining industry. Many different spellings are used on different local signposts and on different maps. The village lies within the Derbyshire Peak District, lying on the River Bradford. There are a number of historic buildings in the village, such as Old Hall Farm (1630), Thimble Hall and The Old Hall (c1650). In the centre of the market place is a large circular water tank known locally as ‘The Fountain'. Since 1829 this supplied water to the villagers, initially at an annual charge of 6d. It was built following a campaign by the ‘Friendly Society of Women', who demanded a cleaner, healthier and more efficient supply of water than carrying the water up from Bradford Dale. Youlgreave holds well-dressings towards the end of June. These are in celebration of the setting-up of The Fountain in 1829. The village dresses five wells, all of which are centred on The Fountain. The 18th century Thimble Hall stands behind the water tower, it was originally a one-up, one-down cottage with a ladder for a staircase; no bathroom or kitchen nor even running water and was said to have been home to a family of eight around a hundred years ago. It was last occupied as a dwelling in the early 1930s. The parish church of All Saints which stands tall in the centre of the village is one of the largest of the peak district and is Norman in origin it was built around 1130-1150 A.D but has had many alterations over time. On this walk you will encounter a couple of gates, several squeeze stiles, a steep flight of metal steps and three bridges. Some sections, especially those over the fields, can be muddy after wet weather but generally the paths are of good quality and easy to follow. Many of the fields will be holding livestock so take care with dogs.
Pant-y-Creigiau Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.82051293,-3.37314192 This circular walk takes you from the Pontsticill Reservoir up onto the summit of Pant-y-Creigiau overlooking the southern Brecon Beacons. On a clear day, this walk gives wide ranging views taking in the Pontsticill, Pentwyn and Talybont Reservoirs and the hills of the southern Brecon Beacons, including the southern horseshoe. The Brecon Beacons is a very remote/exposed area and it can be easy to lose your way, so remember the usual walking rules: be prepared with a paper map and compass as well as snacks/drinks and appropriate clothing/footwear. There is one stiff climb up to the summit of Pant-y-Creigiau and some muddy paths - especially after rain - so waterproof boots are recommended.There are several gates on route, plus one stile. OS Explorer OL12 or Landranger 160.
Cromford, High Peak Junction and Black Rocks Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.109606,-1.553481 An interesting circular walk exploring the industrial past of the area around Cromford. A large part of the village was built by Richard Arkwright to house the mill workers for the nearby Cromford Mill which he built in 1771. They were also provided with shops, pubs, chapels and a school. The walk starts on the canal wharf, where the friends of Cromford Canal run boat trips every Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday throughout the year. Within the wharf area there was a warehouse, a weighing machine, sawpit, counting houses, stables and a smithy. Many of the old canal buildings can still be seen. The walk takes in a lovely stretch of the canal which was completed in 1794. The walk also takes in a canal aqueduct over the River Derwent and the Leawood Pumphouse, a steam-powered beam engine which operates on some summer weekends and bank holidays. At High Peak Junction you join the High Peak Trail which follows the former Cromford and High Peak Railway. On this walk you will go through two gates, over one stile and negotiate a few wooden steps. The paths are of good quality but the incline can be muddy after wet weather.The incline is pretty steep but is the only uphill section of the walk. Picnic sites are located at the canal wharf, High Peak Junction and Black Rocks. The appropriate map is Ordnance Survey ‐ Explorer OL24.
The Red Fox Thornton Hough and Brimstage Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.317126,-3.052585 A 5 mile circular pub walk from the Red Fox in Thornton Hough in the Wirral, Merseyside. The Red Fox is a beautiful old brick and sandstone hall with a well-stocked bar at its heart and lots of rooms where you can enjoy a drink or bite to eat. The walking route takes in the two historic villages of Thornton Hough and Brimstage as well as the peaceful areas of parkland and farmland in between. You will have chance to see a range of historic halls and manor houses, plenty of pretty cottages and even a maze of maize. The walk is almost entirely flat with just a couple of gentle slopes. The paths follow sections of pavement and also pass through woodland and fields where it can be very muddy underfoot, so good boots are a must. You will need to negotiate some kissing gates plus 3 stiles (all the stiles have gaps alongside/underneath that should be suitable for medium-large dogs to pass through, our standard poodle managed just fine). Whilst most of the fields are arable, three of the fields may be holding cattle at certain times of the year so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
The Hayhurst Arms Moulton and River Weaver Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.21925,-2.493957 A 6 mile circular pub walk from the Hayhurst Arms in Bostock Green near Middlewich, Cheshire. Originally established as the village Reading Room, today the Hayhurst Arms is a proper village pub with a well-stocked bar at its heart. The walking route has plenty of interest for everyone, taking in pretty villages, the tree at centre of Cheshire, signs of the area's historic industrial past and a picturesque stretch along the towpath of the Weaver Navigation. The walk has a few gentle climbs and descents plus longer sections of level walking. The route follows mainly pavements, lanes and stone tracks/towpaths, however one section does follow a grass track across a crop field and this can be very muddy in winter and after rain. You will need to cross the main A533 road twice. This road can be busy so take particular care and it may be worth avoiding peak traffic times. There are several gates/kissing gates to negotiate, but there are no stiles on route. One short section of the towpath crosses a water meadow which is occasionally used to graze cattle. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
Moor Lane, Cales Dale and Lathkill Dale Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.17716,-1.713296 A varied circular walk crossing farmland to descend into the valley at Cales Dale and then following the pretty river along Lathkill Dale. Lathkill Dale is one of our country's finest limestone valleys. It is a steep sided valley which is flanked by limestone cliffs and along which the crystal clear River Lathkill runs. The dale is rich in ancient woodland and was once heavily mined for lead. You can see the remains of this industry along the route and, if you wish, you can explore the ruin of Bateman's House, including an old shaft. Much of the river and sections of the river valley, fall within the Derbyshire Dales National Nature Reserve. Among the species that thrive here are brown trout, dipper, and the rare wild plant Jacob's Ladder. On this walk you will cross several types of stiles (wall, fence, squeeze) and go through several gates/kissing gates. Some sections of farmland could contain livestock (both sheep and cattle) and may be muddy after wet weather. You will need to negotiate a very steep flight of stone steps which could be slippery after wet weather. The path along the first half of the dale is narrow and rocky in places and follows the river very closely, meaning some sections could be flooded after heavy rain. The section of path that runs between two stone walls at Meadow Place Grange Farm is very muddy most of the time as this is used daily by cattle. Toilets and refreshments are available in the village of Youlgreave or in the centre of the nearby town of Bakewell.
The Bletchingley Arms Greensand Country Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.240544,-0.095665 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Bletchingley Arms in Bletchingley, Surrey. The Bletchingley Arms is a warm and welcoming place with a chic and quirky style, perfect for a coffee or lunch before or after your walk. The walking route explores the countryside surrounding the village of Bletchingley, taking in the Greensands Ridge, large open pastures and small belts of woodland with glorious views to be enjoyed along the way. The route includes a few steady climbs and descents throughout. Most of the paths are unmade, crossing fields and woodland, and can be very muddy at any time of year so good boots are a must. You will need to negotiate 8 stiles on route (although you many find the farm gates alongside some of these stiles are unlocked) plus 3 staggered barriers and some steps. The stiles have fenced surrounds that small/medium dogs should be able to negotiate, but larger dogs will need a lift over. The walk crosses through a number of sheep pastures so take particular care with dogs. Approximate time 2 hours.
Rowsley and Calton Lees Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.187284,-1.61738 A circular walk which takes you from Rowsley over farmland and through the pretty hamlet of Calton Lees which is on the edge of the Chatsworth Estate. You then go through woodland on part of the Haddon Hall estate to return to Rowsley following farm tracks. There are many local attractions should you wish to make a full day out. Rowsley sits at the point where the River Wye flows into the River Derwent, which made it the perfect place to site Caudwell Mill. Caudwell Mill, which we pass on the walk, is a fine example of a working 19th century mill. The outbuildings today house a number of shops and workshops as well as an excellent cafe. The present mill was built in 1874 by John Caudwell and ran as a family business for over 100 years. Most of the machinery is pre 1914 and still driven by a system of belts and pulleys from line shafts. It is powered by 2 water turbines, one to drive the mill, the other generating electricity used in the mill. The mill is open daily from 1st March to 31st October and at weekends from November to February. The Peak Village is also sited in Rowsley, a factory outlet shopping centre with shops, a coffee shop and restaurant. Peak Village is open daily throughout the year. In the middle of the outlet is the former Rowsley Railway station. The station was constructed as part of the Manchester, Buxton, Matlock and Midland Junction Railway, which, despite its name, only managed to construct a line between Ambergate, Matlock and Rowsley and opened in 1849. Just outside the village there is also Peak Rail, a heritage steam railway that runs from Rowsley to Matlock. Trains run throughout the year. There are lots of muddy/boggy sections on this walk especially after wet weather. Some of the farm pastures could contain livestock so please take care with dogs. There are several gates and stiles (including ladder and fence stiles) to negotiate along the walk. The appropriate map is OL 24 Peak District White Peak area. There are two tea shops on this walk, one requiring a short diversion from the route. The first is within the garden centre at Calton Lees (around half way through the walk), the second is near the end of the walk within the Caudwell Mill complex in Rowsley. Toilets are available at the tea shops or at Peak Village shopping outlet which is a short walk from your start point.
Eyam, Rileys Graves and Stoney Middleton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.287313933229,-1.67747229337692 A walk from the quiet village of Eyam, a village with an incredible story of tragedy, bravery and sacrifice. At the end of August 1665 bubonic plague arrived at the house of the village tailor, George Viccars, via a parcel of cloth from London. The damp cloth was hung out in front of the fire to dry, releasing the plague infested fleas and George Viccars became the first victim of the plague. The plague spread among the villagers and, on the advice of Rector William Mompesson, it was decided to hold the church services outdoors and that the villagers would stay within the confines of the village to minimize the spread of the disease. It was also agreed that families would bury their own dead. The plague ran from September 1665 to October 1666 and claimed at least 260 villagers. During the period of isolation, food and supplies where left for the villagers at Mompesson's Well and at the boundary stone, high up on the hills above the village. Goods were paid for by coins which were dipped in vinegar to disinfect them. On this walk you will need to negotiate a couple of uneven rocky paths, one of which is quite a steep descent. You will also climb a steep grassy section at Stoney Middleton which can be slippery if wet. You will pass through several gates and a few squeeze stiles. Some sections are muddy after wet weather and some of the fields could be holding livestock. The Hall at Eyam is open to the public and is run by the National Trust (Charges apply). There is also a museum opposite the car park that tells the story of the plague (charges apply). Toilets can be found in the car park or at the Eyam Hall Site.
Rowsley, Stanton Moor and Stanton Woodhouse Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.187341,-1.617007 A circular walk starting from a layby in the village of Rowsley. Rowsley has many attractions to keep visitors busy including the Peak Village shopping complex, Caudwell Mill and Peak Rail (a heritage steam railway), along with several walks in the area. This walk follows the River Wye for a short section before climbing at varying degrees of steepness to reach Stanton Moor. On the moor if you wish you could take a slight detour to explore the ancient Nine Ladies stone circle. This is a set of nine small stones set upright on the inside of a stone bank, traditionally believed to depict nine ladies turned to stone as a penalty for dancing on Sunday. It is part of a complex of prehistoric circles and standing stones on Stanton Moor. Stanton Woodhouse is also passed along the walk, once a shooting lodge belonging to the Duke of Rutland. It is a surprisingly large manor house of the later 16th century. In the 1900s it was used for a time as a maternity hospital and residential home for the elderly but is now a private house. The first half of the walk up to Stanton Moor is nearly all uphill and some sections are very steep. From the top of the moor it is mainly downhill back to Rowsley. As the walk crosses several sections of farmland be aware that these could contain livestock so please take care if walking with dogs. On the walk you will need to negotiate exposed tree roots, stony paths, steps, areas of mud and slippery grass banks. There are several stiles including fence, wall and squeeze types to negotiate as well as a selection of gates. The correct map for this walk is Explorer OL 24: The Peak District White Peak Area.
Lydiard Park Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.560012,-1.855037 A 3 mile circular walk around Lydiard Park, near Swindon in Wiltshire. Lydiard Park lies right at the edge of Swindon, providing a delightful peaceful spot to escape the hustle and bustle. Popular with dog walkers and families, the walk takes you on a tour of the grounds taking in the mansion, lakes, gardens and parkland. Lydiard Park is open every day (except Christmas Day) from 7.30am until dusk. Entrance to the park is free, but fees apply if you want to go inside the house and/or walled garden. The walk is almost entirely flat with just a couple of gentle slopes. The route follows surfaced paths the whole way round making it suitable for pushchairs and wheelchairs. There are just a few single gates to negotiate, with no steps, stiles or kissing gates on route. There are public toilets and a cafe by the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 45 minutes to 1 hour.
The Kipling Roedean and Rottingdean Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.812167,-0.088958 A 4.5 mile circular walk along the south coast near Brighton, taking in the beautiful undercliff path, the pretty village of Rottingdean and then climbing up to Beacon Hill for the return leg across the Downs. You will be rewarded throughout with expansive views both out to sea as well as across the rolling hills. Rottingdean is most famous for its literary connections with the author Rudyard Kipling who lived there and was inspired by the South Downs for some of his poetry. The walk follows the level, surfaced undercliff path for the first half, making for easy walking. However, do NOT attempt this walk in bad weather as the undercliff path can be dangerous with waves and beach debris at these times. The second half includes several climbs/descents across the hills of the South Downs and the unmade paths here can be very muddy and slippery in winter and after rain. You will need to negotiate a number of gates and 3 stiles (all of the stiles have open fence surrounds which should be suitable for most dogs to pass through). Several of the fields on the return stretch may be holding cattle so take particular care with dogs. There are public toilets half-way along the undercliff path. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Wrens Nest Red Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.527756,-2.095908 This is a 2 mile circular walk around the large limestone outcrop known as the Wrens Nest in Dudley. It starts at the car park on Wrens Hill Road and follows footpaths around the site. The site itself is a former limestone quarry that has since been recovered by nature. The walk offers some excellent views of limestone formations and outcrops and passes through broadleaf woodland. You may also be able to find fossils on the site, which you can take home with you. There are lots of context boards detailing the history of the area, which goes back 420 million years! This walk shows you some of the species that have colonised the area. There are no stiles on the site but there are quite a few flights of steps, only some of which have handrails and there are a few cut-throughs with a step. Some of the paths are well maintained while others are less so. Some paths will be muddy and have uneven steps. The route is very well signposted throughout - look for the red butterfly symbol.
The Skirrid Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.8422480579,-2.975688111 A circular walk around and over Ysgyryd Fawr (The Skirrid), near Abergavenny. On a clear day, this gives beautiful views of the Black Mountains, Brecon Beacons and surrounding borders countryside. This way of doing it means that you have a gentle downwards ridge walk with the Bristol Channel in the distance for the second half of the walk. The Brecon Beacons is a very remote/exposed area and it can be easy to lose your way, so remember the usual walking rules: be prepared with a paper map and compass as well as snacks/drinks and appropriate clothing/footwear. At certain times of the year (after wet weather), this walk can be very muddy and slippery in places, so we recommend stout boots and walking poles in these conditions. You will need to negotiate a gate and some steps, but there are no stiles. There is no livestock on route. OS Explorer OL13 or Landranger 161.
Vale of Pewsey and the Giant's Grave Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.348527,-1.774799 A 5 mile circular walk from Pewsey Wharf in Wiltshire. This particularly rewarding walk begins with a peaceful stretch of the Kennet and Avon Canal, before climbing gradually and then more steeply to reach Oare Hill within the Marlborough Downs. Here you will find the Giant's Grave, an ancient burial long barrow with a charming local legend. The views are spectacular so try to time your walk for a clear day. The return leg descends through arable fields to rejoin the canal for the final stretch. The walk includes one gradual and then fairly stiff climb to the summit of Oare Hill (250m above sea level, a 120m ascent) and then the equivalent descent. Whilst most of the towpath is surfaced, the rest of the paths are all unmade and some sections (particularly towards the end) can be very deep with mud after rain and in winter so good waterproof boots are a must. The top of the ridge is very exposed so make sure you have appropriate clothing. There are two gates plus four stiles on route (all of which have areas of open fence alongside which most dogs should be able to negotiate). The fields are all arable so you are unlikely to come across livestock. There is a cafe in the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours.
Bestwood Country Park Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.022489,-1.172599 A 3 mile circular walk around Bestwood Country Park in Nottinghamshire. The walk explores the many habitats within the park including heath, woodland, grassland, wetland and gardens and also takes in the park's iconic landmark, the surviving headstock and winding house which has been retained to commemorate the time when the site was home to Bestwood Colliery. Popular with families and dog walkers, the park offers plenty of interest with industrial heritage, plenty of wildlife and spectacular views. Bestwood Country Park is open daily from 10am to 4pm or 5pm. The walk has several long and fairly steep climbs and descents throughout. The majority of the paths are surfaced with stone, but some unmade stretches over the grassland and woodland can be quite muddy after rain and in winter. There are no stiles to negotiate, just a squeeze gap and some kissing gates and single gates. Dogs are welcome in the park and bins are provided for dog waste. There are public toilets near Alexandra Lodge, about halfway round. If you wish to tour the former colliery buildings, check opening times before setting out as they are very limited. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Mountsorrel and the River Soar Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.727448,-1.137087 A 3 mile circular walk from the pretty Leicestershire village of Mountsorrel. The route explores the attractions within the village itself, including the buttercross, market cross and former castle site, as well as guiding you to stride out along a peaceful stretch of the River Soar, part of the Grand Union Canal. There is plenty of historical interest within the village plus birdlife and boat-life to enjoy along the river. The expansive views from the top of Castle Hill make the short climb very worthwhile. The walk is almost entirely flat for the most part, with just one optional climb up to the summit of Castle Hill. The riverside paths are unmade and can get very muddy after rain and in winter. There are 6 stiles to negotiate (all of which have large spaces within the wooden fence surrounds which should be suitable for most dogs to pass through) plus some kissing gates and steps. The river can be fast flowing and deep in parts and also includes some weirs and locks so take particular care with children. Some of the riverside pastures may be holding livestock so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Biggin, Wolfscote and Beresford Dales Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.139788,-1.810686 A pleasant circular walk along three interconnecting limestone dales starting from the village of Hartington. Biggin Dale, the first on the walk, is predominantly dry except for the latter part, where a stream appears and, for some distance, competes with the footpath. This is a very pretty dale and is also part of the Derbyshire Dales National Nature Reserve. Wolfscote Dale, the second on the walk, has high rocky cliffs and the River Dove flows between its steep banks. The third dale is Beresford Dale a much gentler tree lined dale, along which the River Dove continues to flow. Hartington is a major tourist village, set in the Dove Valley, with a duck pond on the green, a cheese shop, several pubs, a post office and general store. On the walk you will pass over sections of farmland so please take care with dogs as the fields may contain livestock. There are several gates on route and various types of stile including wall and squeezer. A few places may be muddy especially after wet weather and some sections are rocky under foot, so good stout footwear is recommended. From the middle to the end of Biggin Dale the footpath in places competes with a stream so some care is needed to negotiate these wet sections. Public toilets are located at the start of the walk and refreshments are available in the village.
Between the Afan and Pelenna Valleys Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.633655,-3.735754 This walk begins near the village of Pontrhydyfen - the birthplace of the actor Richard Burton. It shows you something of the Afan river and valley, then follows the route of chapel goers of the past, up the mountain to Gyfylchi where the ruins of the chapel are now next to a centre used by mountain bikers. The walk then goes along forest tracks and paths to stream-filled older woodland and through to the River Pelenna where reed beds remove impurities from water flowing from old mine workings. Near the village of Tonmawr, it brings you back up to Gyfylchi and along a deserted upland road with extensive views stretching across Neath and Swansea Bay. Then back down above Pontrhydyfen to Rhyslyn. This area is surprisingly remote and this walk gives a day out in the quiet and the wild. There is a lot of uphill walking which is why the route has a 4 boot difficulty grading. You will also need to negotiate a number of kissing gates, steps and stiles along the way.
Fan Frynych Ridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.9255665224,-3.4878449421 This walk, from the Brecon Beacons Visitor Centre (Mountain Centre) near Libanus, gives superb views of both the western Fans, Fforest Fawr and the Central Beacons. It probably gives the best views of Pen-y-Fan and Corn Ddu on offer. It even shows the northern slopes of the Black Mountains stretching away to Hay Bluff. The Brecon Beacons is a very remote/exposed area and it can be easy to lose your way, so remember the usual walking rules: be prepared with a paper map and compass as well as snacks/drinks and appropriate clothing/footwear. The steepest part of the climb is surprisingly short and then becomes a fairly gentle incline up to the summit of Fan Frynych. It is best done on a clear day when the wind on the summits is less than about 15mph. We suggest walking boots - for any boggy bits. There is no rocky walking involved as the walk is across track, moorland and some farmland at the end. There are a few stiles near the end and there can also be livestock in the fields.
Wetton, Manifold Valley and Thor's Cave Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.09403,-1.838219 The walk starts from the small village of Wetton which lies in the Staffordshire Peak District. The village has an inn, a church, and consists of a collection of farmhouses, cottages and a few larger houses. The walk takes you over sections of farmland, down dry dales then along the Manifold Valley Trail where the route passes Thor's Cave, from where you have magnificent views back down the valley. Thor's Cave, high above the River Manifold, has a 60ft entrance and looks quite spectacular. It is one of many caves in the area from which ancient bones and artefacts have been found. You will need to negotiate several types of stiles (including squeeze, wall and fence) and several gates. Some farmland is crossed so please take care with dogs as these fields may contain livestock. The footpath up to Thor's Cave has many flights of steep wooden steps, and this path could be slippery after wet weather. Public toilets are located at the start of the walk and also at Wetton Mill where you can also obtain refreshments if required (check opening times). The correct map is Explorer OL24 The Peak District White Peak Area.
Calton Lees and Chatsworth Estate Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.212499,-1.613835 A circular walk starting from the Calton Lees Car Park, located on the Chatsworth House Estate. The walk takes you over farmland, up over moorland and along the quiet wooded lanes of the Chatsworth Estate. Chatsworth is one of the most elegant and popular of England's stately homes and is surrounded by parkland, moors and a backdrop of wooded hillsides and also stands on the banks of the River Derwent. It was first opened to the public in 1844 and continues to attract large numbers of visitors every year to the house, gardens, farm and parkland. Building of the house was started in 1549 when Sir William Cavendish acquired the land. He died before it was completed and it was finished by his widow, Bess of Hardwick, She also commissioned the magnificent Elizabethan house of Hardwick Hall. Chatsworth has now been home to generations of the Cavendish family and is the seat of the current Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. On the walk you will need to negotiate several gates and a few wall stiles.The steps down below the Hunting Tower are very steep and uneven and can be slippery if wet. Some sections of the walk could be boggy especially after wet weather. Care should be taken with dogs at all times as the Chatsworth Estate has free roaming livestock. Toilets and refreshments are available in the Garden Centre and also at Chatsworth House courtyard. The correct map for the walk is Explorer OL24 White Peak.
The Abbots Mitre Chilbolton and Cottonworth Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.157755,-1.439807 A circular pub walk of just over 3 miles, from the Abbots Mitre in the pretty village of Chilbolton in Hampshire. The Abbots Mitre is a superb traditional village pub serving locally sourced food, a range of local ales and with roaring open fires in the winter months. The walking route takes in this picturesque area of the Test Valley, with the villages of Chilbolton and Cottonworth living up to their charming names. As well as exploring the village streets, you will have chance to enjoy two nature reserves, West Down and Chilbolton Cow Common, all in the setting of the Test Valley with plenty of wildlife to discover. The walk is relatively flat with just a few gentle slopes to contend with. The paths across the commons are unmade and can get quite muddy after rain and in winter, so good boots are recommended. There are a couple of sections of walking along the village lanes (about three quarters of a mile in total) which do not have pavements so take care of traffic for these stretches. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates and two stiles on route (both stiles have large gaps in the fencing alongside suitable for most dogs to pass through). Conservation grazing is undertaken at West Down by ponies and at Chilbolton Cow Common by cattle (in the summer months) so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Explore Surrey: Pirbright Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.293701,-0.645547 A 4 mile (6.5km) pleasant walk from Pirbright village passing through fields, woodland and heathland. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk is mainly flat with just a couple of gentle slopes. Stout shoes/boots are recommended as the route can be muddy in places. You will need to negotiate several gates/kissing gates plus two low stiles (which most dogs should be able to pass under or hop over). A couple of the fields you cross are likely to be holding horses so take care with dogs. The route includes a few stretches along quiet lanes without pavements, so take care of traffic at these points. Allow 2 hours. If you are looking for refreshments, the White Hart pub is next to the green at the start point, and the Cricketers pub is at the other end of the green, towards the end of the walk. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 145 Guildford and Farnham. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Grayswood Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.104913,-0.690873 A gently undulating 3 mile (4km) walk from the village of Grayswood, passing through woodland and farmland.This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk includes several steady climbs and descents. Part of the walk crosses fields of clay soil, which can become very muddy so stout boots or wellingtons are recommended. You will need to negotiate several gates, some steps and one stile along the way (there is a field gate alongside the stile which is usually unlocked and there is plenty of open fencing suitable for most dogs to pass through). Some of the route follows rural lanes without pavements, so take care of traffic for these stretches. Allow 1.5 hours. If you would like refreshments, The Wheatsheaf Inn on Grayswood Road is located near to the war memorial close to the beginning of the walk. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 133 Haslemere & Petersfield. This walk follows public rights of way which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Prospects of Polesden Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.241174,-0.365429 A 5 mile (8km) undulating walk from Ranmore Common in the Surrey Hills, through part of the National Trust estate of Polesden Lacey. There are good views of the Mole Gap, London and, on a clear day, the South Downs. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk includes several steady but very long climbs and descents throughout. The tracks can be very muddy and slippery so stout boots or wellingtons with good grip are recommended. There are two gates along the route, but no stiles. You can take an optional detour to enter the grounds or house of Polesden Lacey, but admission fees apply for this (free for National Trust members). Allow 2.5 hours, with extra time for stops or detours. There are no pubs or shops along the route. There are toilets and a tearoom within the grounds of Polesden Lacey (admission fees would apply for this). Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate. The Polesden Lacey Estate and parts of Ranmore Common and Denbies Hillside are owned by the National Trust. This walk follows public rights of way over private and National Trust land. Please respect National Trust bylaws, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
North Lees, Dennis Knoll and Stanage Edge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.350451,-1.645243 A circular walk down the valley of the North Lees Estate and up over a section of Stanage Edge with its magnificent views of the Derwent Valley. North Lees Estate was once owned by the Eyre family and it is said that Charlotte Bronte visited the nearby North Lees Hall and that this is where she got her inspiration for her novel Jane Eyre. Up to the early 20th century, millstone grit was quarried bellow Stanage Edge which was used to make grinding wheels, build houses and pave roads. There is also evidence of a Bronze Age farming community.The estate is managed by the National Park Authority and receives over half a million visitors per year. It is also designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest. On the walk you will need to negotiate some gates, steps, a set of stepping stones across a stream and several stiles (including wall and fence types). The path over and down from Stanage Edge is very uneven and rocky so good footwear is recommended. Sheep tend to roam free across the area so care should be taken if walking with dogs. Toilets are located at the beginning of the walk and refreshments can be obtained in the nearby village of Hathersage.
Explore Surrey: Puttenham Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.207413,-0.68472 A 3 mile (5km) gently undulating circular walk starting from Puttenham Common, passing through farmland and woodland. The walk passes the Palladian mansion Puttenham Priory, and through the village of Puttenham along the foot of the Hog's Back ridge. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk includes several climbs and descents throughout. The paths can get quite muddy so stout boots are recommended. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates, some steps and 9 stiles along the way (all the stiles have adjacent dog gates or gaps in the fencing alongside that should be suitable for most dogs to pass through). You may come across livestock in some of the fields, including at least one field which may hold cattle, so take care with dogs. Approximate time 1.5 hours. If you are looking for refreshments, the Good Intent pub in Puttenham village is about half way round the route. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 145 Guildford and Farnham. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Beare Green Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.181294,-0.320596 A 3.5 mile (5.25km) undulating walk through farmland and woodland starting from Holmwood Station in Beare Green village. On a clear day there are good views to the Greensand Ridge and the North Downs. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has several gentle gradients throughout. The paths cross a number of heavy clay soil pastures and fields and at times these can be very muddy (or with standing water) so waterproof boots or wellingtons are recommended. You will need to negotiate some steps, gates and 10 stiles (a couple of which are set into narrow fencing so larger dogs may need a lift over). Some of the fields you cross are likely to be holding horses and sheep so take particular care with dogs. Allow 2 hours. If you would like refreshments there are a few options. There is a café and newsagent in Beare Green Court parade of shops, which you pass towards the end of the walk. The Clubhouse at Henfold Lake Fisheries is open seasonally for refreshments and has toilets (Waypoint 5). The Duke's Head pub & restaurant is 300m south of Waypoint 9 on the A24. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Norbury Park Eastern Loop Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.282966,-0.333451 A slightly challenging walk of 2.5 miles (4km) around Norbury Park, a mix of woodland, chalk grassland and farmed fields. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk includes several climbs and descents throughout including a few reasonably steep gradients. The route follows paths through woodland and clay fields which can get very muddy. You will need to negotiate some steps and kissing gates but there are no stiles. One of the fields may be holding livestock so take particular care with dogs. The walk is waymarked by posts with green arrows. Allow 1.5 hours. If you are looking for refreshments, there are cafe and toilet facilities at Bocketts Farm near to the start of the trail. Alternatively there is a picnic site along the route should you wish to bring your own food. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Norbury Park Western Loop Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.281334,-0.350074 A fairly easy walk of just less than 4.5 miles (7km) around Norbury Park, a mix of woodland, chalk grassland and farmed fields. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk includes several long but very gentle gradients. Most of the paths are firm stone tracks, but a few sections in the second half of the walk can get very muddy at times. There are no steps, stiles or gates on route. You will be sharing the bridleways with cyclists and horse riders and you may also come across timber lorries on some of the tracks. There is one section along a quiet public lane so take care of any traffic here. Temporary electric fencing is used to create pastures for conservation grazing at the sides of some of the paths, so take care with children and dogs. After periods of dry weather, the route would be suitable for the more rugged types of off-road pushchairs or disabled buggies. The walk is waymarked by posts with a cycle symbol. Allow 2 hours. If you are looking for refreshments, there are cafe and toilet facilities at Bocketts Farm near to the start of the trail. Alternatively there are a couple of picnic sites along the route should you wish to bring your own food. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Effingham Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.290793,-0.420054 A 4.5 mile (7km) gently undulating walk starting from Effingham Junction rail station. The route passes through woodland, farmland and over several commons. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk includes a few gentle gradients. The route crosses heavy clay fields and wet low-lying meadows so good walking boots are required all year and wellingtons are recommended in the winter months (when some sections can be very muddy or have standing water). You will need to negotiate some gates plus 11 stiles (all of which have gaps alongside which should be suitable for most dogs to pass through). Several of the fields that you cross will be holding horses so take care with dogs. Allow 2 to 2.5hrs, depending on the conditions underfoot. There are no pubs or shops along the main route. There is the choice of an optional detour into Effingham village where you will find The Plough pub and the Sir Douglas Haig Hotel near the junction between Lower Road and The Street. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Boxhill & Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Medieval Waverley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.183012,-0.751759 A 6 mile (9.5km) undulating circular walk from Tilford village passing close to The Sands village and the historic ruins of Waverley Abbey. From the top of Crooksbury Hill there are good views to the South Downs on a clear day. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk involves several steady gradients plus one steeper climb to the top of Crooksbury Hill. The paths and tracks through the commons and woodlands are all unmade and can get quite muddy so good boots are recommended (or wellingtons in the winter). There are some sections of road walking so take care of traffic on these stretches. You will need to negotiate a long flight of steps but there are no kissing gates or stiles on route. Allow 3 hours, with an extra hour for the detour to Waverley Abbey. There are public toilets at the start of the walk, on Tilford Green by the school. If you are looking for refreshments there are several options. Tilford has a post office and tea room and there are three pubs along the route. The Barley Mow on Tilford Green is at the start/end of the walk, the Barley Mow at The Sands is at Waypoint 6 and The Donkey is at Waypoint 7. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 145 Guildford & Farnham. This walk follows public rights of way which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Over the Downs to Oxted Mill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.289684,-0.051765 A 5.5 mile (8.5km) linear walk through the North Downs from Woldingham station to Hurst Green station, passing the historic High Street in Old Oxted and Oxted Mill. The route goes through ancient woodland and chalk grassland, both rich in wild flowers, and there are good views towards the south coast over the Sussex Weald. The return journey can be completed with a single 10 minute train journey. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk involves several climbs and descents throughout. The paths and tracks through the woodlands and fields are all unmade so stout shoes or boots are required and wellingtons with good grips are recommended in winter. There are a couple of short stretches of walking along country lanes so take care of traffic at these points. You will need to negotiate some steps, two kissing gates (one of which is very tight so be prepared to breathe in!) and three stiles (all of which have fence surrounds which should be ok for medium-large dogs to pass through –our standard poodle was just small enough – but dogs larger than this may need a lift over). You will pass through some fields holding horses so take care with dogs. Allow 2.5 to 3 hours. If you are looking for refreshments there are several options. In Woldingham there is a tearoom within Knights Garden Centre, just a few minutes' walk from the station along Woldingham Road (turn left from the ticket office). There are a number of pubs in Old Oxted High Street near waypoint 5, as well as the Haycutter pub at Broadham Green at waypoint 7. There are toilets and a snack kiosk at Hurst Green station, with shops nearby. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Corner of Four Counties Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.167132,0.009557 A 5.5 mile (8.5km) tranquil walk through rural Surrey passing close to the neighbouring counties of Kent, East Sussex and West Sussex. The route passes a number of farms, past fields of sheep, cattle and horses and through woodland. There are extensive views to the chalk ridge of the North Downs, and the Weald to the south. Part of the route follows the Vanguard Way, a long distance footpath linking the London suburbs to the south coast. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The route includes several climbs and descents throughout. The tracks and paths through woodland and farmland are mostly firm, but some sections can become very muddy and slippery in winter and after periods of rain so stout boots are recommended all year and wellingtons with grips in winter/after wet periods. You will need to negotiate a few kissing gates, a stream crossing (the stream is narrow but can be deep) plus three stiles (one of which is enclosed with wire fencing so dogs will need a lift over). You will be sharing some of the fields with livestock (sheep, horses and maybe cattle) so take particular care with dogs. Allow 2.5 to 3 hours, depending on the conditions underfoot. If you are looking for refreshments, the Plough Inn at the start of the walk is open all day. There are shops and other pubs in Dormansland village, half a mile from the start of the walk. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 147 Sevenoaks & Tonbridge. This walk follows public rights of way which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Dormans Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.155531,-0.003742 A 4.5 mile (7km) enjoyable walk from Dormans Station. The walk crosses Lingfield Park racecourse and golf course, passes through the Dormans Park estate and past the Cook's Pond Viaduct. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has a few steady gradients. The paths are firm for the most part but the unmade sections through woodland and the golf course can get very muddy so good stout boots are recommended. You will need to negotiate some kissing gates and steps, but there are no stiles or livestock on route. The walk crosses a golf course so please show respect for the golfers by allowing them to play their shots before you cross and watch closely for any stray flying golf balls. Allow 2 hours. There are no pubs or shops along the route, but you can take an optional 10 minute detour to the village of Dormansland where there are public toilets, a shop and two pubs (The Royal Oak pub on the High Street and The Old House at Home pub on West Street). Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate (note: Dormansland village is covered on Explorer 147 Sevenoaks & Tonbridge). This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Capel Loops Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.153832,-0.319768 An enjoyable 6 mile (9.5km) walk in two sections, making it ideal for a lunchtime stop in Capel village. There is an option to shorten the route by completing just the first loop of 3 miles (4.8km). The walk passes through farmland and woodland, with beautiful wildflowers in the spring. There are good views to Leith Hill and the North Downs. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk includes a few steady gradients. The paths through fields and woodland can be quite marshy and muddy so good boots are required and wellingtons are recommended for the winter months. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates plus 17 stiles (10 within the first loop and 7 within the second). All the stiles in the first loop have open fence surrounds making them suitable for most dogs to pass through, but one stile on the second loop is enclosed by wire mesh and so dogs will need a lift over this. You will be sharing some of the fields with horses and sheep and sometimes cattle so take care with dogs. Allow 3 hours (1.5 hours per loop). If you are looking for refreshments, The Crown pub is at the start of the walk. There is also a petrol station with shop opposite, and a newsagent further south along The Street. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Ranmore Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.259455,-0.341127 A 6 mile (9.5km) circular walk from Boxhill and Westhumble Station in the village of Westhumble, passing through part of the Polesden Lacey Estate, Ranmore Common and Denbies Vineyard. The route follows part of the North Downs Way National Trail. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. This is a hilly walk with several long uphill stretches – make sure you stop regularly to appreciate the impressive views! Parts of the route can get muddy so stout boots or shoes are recommended. You will need to negotiate many gates/kissing gates but there are no stiles or steps on route. A couple of the short fields you cross may be holding sheep so take particular care with dogs. There are a few sections of road walking along quiet lanes so take care of any traffic at these points. Allow 3 hours. If you are looking for refreshments, there are a few options. There is a cycle shop cafe at Boxhill and Westhumble Station and The Stepping Stones pub is 300m from the station (turn right along Westhumble Street to reach this). Denbies Estate vineyard, about two thirds of the way round, has a restaurant and cafe which is open to the public. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Boxhill & Reigate. This walk follows public rights of way that cross private and National Trust land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect National Trust bylaws, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Woldingham Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.290242,-0.051636 An enjoyable 3.5 mile (5.5km) circular walk from Woldingham station. Woldingham sits in the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is surrounded by steep hills and sweeping valleys. The walk follows quiet residential roads and passes through woodland and farmland. Look out for the old stone footpath markers at the ends of some of the paths. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has several long climbs and descents throughout. There are no gates or stiles on route but you will need to negotiate a couple of flights of steps. Most of the paths are firm, but some sections can become muddy after wet weather so stout shoes or boots are recommended. There are some stretches of road walking along quiet residential/access lanes so take care of any traffic at these points. Allow 1.5 hours. There are toilets at the station, open when the ticket office is open. If you are looking for refreshments there are a couple of options. There is a tearoom in Knights Garden Centre, just a few minutes' walk along Woldingham Road from Waypoint 5 and the village shops are a few minutes' walk south of Waypoint 1 (along Station Road past the church). Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways that cross private land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect peoples' privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Kingsford Forest Park Green Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.434525,-2.259348 Kingsford Forest Park Green Trail takes you from the car park at Kingsford Forest Park, through deciduous and coniferous woodlands and across a small area of heath before returning you to the start point. The walk offers some interesting views of the local countryside and takes you through a variety of habitats. There are several benches placed around the site and toilets are available at the start/end of the walk. Kinver is the nearest village, about 2 miles away. The walk takes place in woodland over sandy soil, but parts of the route will be muddy during or after wet weather. There are also a couple of steep sections to navigate, parts of which will be a little difficult to traverse. There are no stiles or steps but there are a few kissing gates. Cattle are used for conservation grazing in one small section of heath so take care with dogs.The route is waymarked around the site - follow the green woodpecker symbol. It will take about an hour to complete.
Staff and Worcs Canal: Cookley to Kidderminster Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.4401753,-2.21753033 This is a 3 mile linear walk along a section of the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal. It commences at Cookley village and heads through quiet countryside to Kidderminster, Worcestershire. The walk itself is along a canal towpath and offers views of the surrounding countryside and of the canal, which is often reasonably busy with boat traffic. The footpath is a well maintained gravel path for the most part and would also be suitable for cyclists. However, there are some low bridges that you will need to take care of while going under and there is also a short tunnel, for which you will need a torch. There are no stiles.
Baggeridge Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.534824,-2.152093 This is a 1.5 mile circular walk around Baggeridge Woods. This walk takes you from the car park at Baggeridge, through the deciduous woodland nearby, past several pools before returning to the car park via the pit mounds. Along the walk you will see Baggeridge Woods, the Wishing Pools located in Baggeridge Park, Whites Wood, Lydiates Wood and Bag Pool. This walk affords views of the surrounding areas, fields, ponds and woodland. It is quite close to the historic Himley Hall, although you will not visit it on this walk. The park has been awarded the Green Flag Award for thirteen consecutive years, and has a picnic area available. There is a tea shop, a children's play area, a miniature railway, a sensory garden and disabled toilets. Other nearby attractions include Penn Common and Himley Hall & Park. You may wish to bring some bird food to place on the bird table at the first waypoint and adjacent to the car park, as many species of birds visit both sites. The walk is along well maintained paths for the most part. There are some steep downhill gradients, but the return route has more shallow slopes. The route can also be quite muddy in parts. There are no stiles or steps on this walk. It will take approximately 1 hour.
Explore Surrey: Tillingbourne at Work Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.215381,-0.525399 An 8 mile (12.5km) undulating walk in the Surrey Hills, starting from Chilworth Station and passing through farmland, woodland and parkland. The route crosses the Tillingbourne stream, which used to power a number of powder, paper and corn mills in the area. Part of the walk follows the Pilgrims Way, running from Winchester to Canterbury. There is also a shorter version of this walk available on iFootpath, 4.5 miles in length. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has several steady slopes plus a couple of steeper sections. The paths across woodland and farmland can get quite muddy so stout shoes or boots are required and wellingtons are recommended in the winter months. You will need to negotiate a number of kissing gates plus 9 stiles (all of which have open fence surrounds which will be suitable for most dogs to pass through). You will be sharing a few of the fields with horses and at least one field may be holding cattle so take particular care with dogs. You will need to cross the railway at an unsignalled footpath crossing so take extreme care and listen carefully for trains before you cross. There is one short stretch of road walking. Allow 4 hours. If you are looking for refreshments there are several options. The Percy Arms pub is at the start of the walk, opposite Chilworth Station, and the William IV pub is in Little London, 5 minutes walk south of Waypoint 4. There are a number of pubs, cafes and shops in the village of Shere, a short walk from Waypoint 5. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 145 Guildford and Farnham. This walk follows public rights of way which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Tillingbourne at Work (Shorter Version) Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.215381,-0.525399 A 4.5 mile (7km) undulating walk in the Surrey Hills, starting from Chilworth Station and passing through farmland, woodland and parkland. The route crosses the Tillingbourne stream, which used to power a number of powder, paper and corn mills in the area. There is also a longer version of this walk available on iFootpath, 8 miles in length. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has several steady slopes plus a couple of steeper sections. The paths across woodland and farmland can get quite muddy so stout shoes or boots are required and wellingtons are recommended in the winter months. You will need to negotiate a number of kissing gates plus 7 stiles (all of which have open fence surrounds which will be suitable for most dogs to pass through). You will be sharing a few of the fields with horses and at least one field may be holding cattle so take particular care with dogs. You will need to cross the railway at an unsignalled footpath crossing so take extreme care and listen carefully for trains before you cross. There is one short stretch of road walking. Allow 2.5 hours. If you are looking for refreshments there are a couple of options. The Percy Arms pub is at the start of the walk, opposite Chilworth Station, and the Drummond Arms pub is in Albury by Waypoint 5. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 145 Guildford and Farnham. This walk follows public rights of way which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Leatherhead Common Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.31153,-0.335098 A 3 mile (5km) circular walk to the north of Leatherhead. This route has been specially devised and signposted by the Lower Mole Countryside Management Project and Mole Valley District Council to provide an easy-to-navigate route into the countryside. The majority of the walk is in woodland but there are contrasting open areas too. Its character will vary with the seasons, so it is worth repeating at different times of the year. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk is almost entirely flat and there are no stiles, gates or steps to negotiate. Conditions underfoot on the woodland paths will vary according to weather and season so stout boots are required and wellingtons are recommended in the winter months. The route is waymarked via a series of timber finger posts with distinctive green arrows. There are several busy roads in the area and special care is needed when crossing them. The route crosses a golf course so please show respect for the golfers by allowing them to play their shots before you cross and watch closely for any stray flying golf balls. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours, depending on the conditions underfoot. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Mole Gap Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.299045,-0.332767 Take the train for a wonderful day out in some of the most beautiful countryside in the south east. The Mole Gap Trail offers the opportunity to visit two historic market towns and the outstanding countryside of the Mole Gap, including England's largest vineyard. You will discover a river that has carved a route through the chalk of the North Downs, some of the best ancient yew and box woodlands in Europe and historic parkland that has inspired famous writers and artists through the centuries. Step off the train at Leatherhead Station and you will soon pick up the silver metal arrows that will guide you along this 6 mile (10km) walk to Dorking. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has a few gentle gradients throughout plus one short steep climb. The paths through parkland and woodland can get muddy so stout footwear is required. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates and some steps but there are no stiles on route. Whilst most of the paths are fenced, a couple of sections cross fields/parkland where you might come across livestock (although all livestock was behind temporary electric fencing when we walked), so take particular care with dogs. On rare occasions the riverside paths can flood, so avoid this walk after prolonged heavy periods of rain. Allow 3 hours. If you are looking for refreshments there are several options. You could stock up on supplies in Leatherhead for a picnic along the way on one of the benches or at Swanworth Picnic Site (Waypoint 4). If you'd rather sit down for a full meal, The Running Horse pub is in Leatherhead just by the Town Bridge (Waypoint 1), The Stepping Stones pub is in Westhumble (just a 2 minute walk along Chapel Lane from Waypoint 5) and Denbies Wine Estate has a restaurant/cafe (just before Waypoint 6). You have an option towards the end of the walk to detour into Dorking High Street, where you will find The White Horse Hotel. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Sandwell Valley: Priory Woods Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.52079,-1.973835 This is a 3 mile circular walk that takes you from Sandwell Park Farm, via footpaths through woodland and by ponds, past the remains of Sandwell Priory and round Swan Pool before returning to the farm. On the walk you will see several ponds, woodland, the remains of a historic Benedictine priory, the sand well that the local area gets its name from, a small area of heathland and a large pool with its plentiful waterfowl. With walking, history and waterfowl, there is something for everyone here. The route follows a clear path for its entire length. Most of it is either tarmac or gravel, but there are a couple of sections that can be muddy. The gradients are very shallow and there are no stiles. There is a kissing gate, but you can take a short flight of steps instead if you prefer. There are no toilets on the walk, though there are some at Sandwell Park Farm (entrance charges apply).
Explore Surrey: Walk the Chalk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.240363,-0.324707 A 7.5 mile (12km) linear walk from Dorking to Gomshall railway stations, via some of the finest chalk grassland in Surrey. The scenery is spectacular and the area is rich in wildlife. The return leg can be completed by a simple train or bus journey (although the services are quite infrequent, so plan your timings before you set out). This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk includes several long-steady and shorter-steep climbs and descents throughout. The paths through woodland and chalk grassland are generally firm but can get very muddy after rain and in the winter months, so good stout boots are required all year and wellingtons with grips are recommended in winter. You will need to negotiate some steps and kissing gates, but there are no stiles on route. At certain times of the year sheep and cattle are used to graze some sections of the chalk grassland as part of the conservation, so take particular care with dogs. The route is waymarked with a green/white arrow symbol with a pedestrian in the centre. Allow 3.5 hours. Refreshments are only available at the start and end of the walk. The Lincoln Arms is situated alongside Dorking Station at the start of the walk. The last half mile of the walk leads you through Gomshall where you will find a number of pubs, restaurants and shops. Ordnance Survey Maps: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill and Reigate and Explorer 145 Guildford and Farnham. This walk follows public rights of way that cross public, private and National Trust land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect National Trust bylaws, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Discover Downside Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.327657,-0.413217 A 6 mile (10km) circular walk from Cobham, taking you through the beautiful countryside around Downside and discovering the local history and wildlife. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has a few climbs and descents throughout. The woodland and field paths can get very muddy so good boots are required (or wellingtons with grips in the winter). You will need to negotiate kissing gates and steps plus 22 stiles. A few of the stiles are very tall and awkward to cross and so would be difficult for less agile people. Some of the stiles have dog gates, but a couple of the tall stiles towards the end of the walk have tight fence surrounds so dogs may need a lift over. You will be sharing some of the fields with horses and sheep and sometimes cattle so take particular care with dogs. There are a few long stretches of road walking along quiet country lanes so please take care of traffic at these points. Allow 3 hours. Refreshments are only available at the start or end of the walk, in Cobham. There is a picnic site at the Semaphore Tower (Waypoint 3) if you wish to take refreshments with you. Ordnance Survey Maps: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill and Reigate and Explorer 145 Guildford and Farnham. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Chessington Countryside Walk Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.343241,-0.291506 A 5.5 mile (8.5km) circular walk taking in the countryside around Chessington. As you walk this route it may come as a surprise to you how much attractive countryside there is close to the London-Surrey border. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has a few gentle slopes throughout with just one short, steeper climb. The woodland and field paths can become very muddy so stout boots are required and wellingtons are recommended in the wet winter months. You will need to negotiate some steps and kissing gates plus one stile. The stile is low and has wide open fence surrounds, suitable for all dogs to pass through or hop over. Whilst most of the paths are enclosed, the route crosses the public open space of Winey Hill where horses graze freely, so please take care with dogs at this point. The route crosses a couple of busy roads so please take your time to ensure you can cross safely. Allow 3 hours. There are public toilets and a picnic site alongside the car park at the start of the walk and there is a brick seat at the top of Winey Hill. There are no other places for refreshments directly on the route itself. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 161 London South. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Bosworth and Congerstone Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.6238290127367,-1.42950098030269 A 7 mile circular walk starting and ending at the Bosworth Water Trust near Market Bosworth in Leicestershire. A mix of undulating fields, riverside track and canal towpath. The walk has a few gentle slopes and the paths across fields can get muddy. You will need to negotiate some steps and several stiles along the way.
Explore Surrey: East Horley Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.180911,-0.155021 A 6 mile (9.5km) circular walk taking you on a journey through time where new meets old and built up areas merge with farmland, streams and woodland. Your route passes through the newest housing developments and goes back in time to encounter World War II pillboxes, hints of the tanning industry and further still to Saxon times with the mysterious site of Thunderfield Castle. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk is almost entirely flat. The ground is however very rough and after wet periods some of the clay soils on the route can become waterlogged and deep with mud. Stout boots are essential and wellingtons recommended in the wetter months. You will need to negotiate several steps and gates plus 15 stiles (all of which have open fence surrounds which should be suitable for most dogs to pass through). There are a number of grazing pastures to cross on this walk, sometimes holding cattle, so please take particular care with dogs. Allow 3 hours. There are no toilets or picnic spots on the route itself. Refreshments are only available at the start and end of the walk, at The Farmhouse pub. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill and Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Sandwell Valley: Sot's Hole Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.521305,-1.974062 This is a 2.5 mile circular trail that takes you from Sandwell Park Farm to Sot's Hole Local Nature Reserve (LNR) before returning to the farm. The walk takes place along quiet footpaths through fields and woodlands. This is an excellent Spring walk, as Sot's Hole is known for its bluebells. The route follows a reasonably clear path for its entire length. Some of it is tarmac, some of it is grass and some gravel/compacted soil. The gradients are very shallow, though there is a single flight of steps. There are also a few kissing gates. A couple of short sections take place next to a road. There are no toilets on the walk, though there are some at Sandwell Park Farm (entrance charges apply).
Explore Surrey: Banstead Woods Nature Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.309747,-0.175443 A 3 mile (5km) circular walk discovering the hidden secrets and natural wonders of Banstead Woods, 250 acres of ancient woodland. Banstead Woods' recorded history stretches back for nearly a thousand years, to the time of the Domesday Book in 1086. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. Most of the paths are firm and in good condition, however some sections can be muddy in the winter or after rainfall so stout shoes, boots or wellingtons are recommended. The route includes several slopes and there are kissing gates at the start and end of the walk. Dogs are welcome in the woodland, in fact it is a very popular dog walking spot, but please clear up after your dog and put the waste in the dog bins provided. The final stretch of 400m crosses a flower meadow where cattle are used for conservation grazing. The cattle seemed very relaxed in the company of dogs as we walked, but do take the usual care if you have a dog with you. (Alternatively, you can easily avoid this section by returning to the car park on the path through the woodland edge). There is plenty to see along the way so allow 2 hours. There are no toilets or places for refreshments along the actual route, however there are many benches along the way should you wish to bring a picnic. The area is covered by Ordnance Survey Map Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill and Reigate. This walk follows permissive footpaths which cross public and private land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Sandwell Valley: Forge Mill Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.533192,-1.9504 This is a 3 mile circular walk set in Sandwell Valley. It takes you from the RSPB reserve on the site, past the northern side of Forge Mill lake, through Forge Mill Farm and its associated fields before returning to the RSPB reserve via the southern side of the lake. The walk offers views of the lake, access to Forge Mill Farm, where you can meet the animals, a stroll through a small wood and views of the River Tame. There are a lot of birds on the lake and a variety of animals at the farm. During the summer and autumn, there is sometimes a maize maze at the farm, but you are advised to check before travelling. The walk takes place on shallow gradients with well maintained footpaths for the most part. Some of the paths around the farm/through the woodland take place on grass, and may be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles or flights of steps on the walk, but there are several gates. Toilets are available at the farm during opening hours.
Brinklow Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.4123517517001,-1.3621907774359 A circular walk around the historic village of Brinklow over fields, roads, and the Oxford Canal plus an optional detour to one of Britain's finest Motte and Bailey castles. The route is mostly level, with a couple of slight inclines on the road sections. There is a set of steps down to the canal, and a set of steps up to Brinklow Castle if you take the detour. The path between Brinklow Castle and Broad Street is narrow, quite steep, uneven and can be muddy. The fields are generally well drained and even after a good rainfall were not muddy, though the canal path can be very muddy in parts. There are a few sheep in the first couple of fields and you will need to negotiate approximately eight kissing gates. There are no facilities on the walk, other than what you can find in Brinklow village.
Burford and the River Windrush Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.808643,-1.632965 A circular walk of just over 6 miles from the classic Cotswold town of Burford in Oxfordshire. Take in the beautiful mellow stone buildings of the medieval town, savour the peace of rural farmland and then enjoy a lovely stretch along the banks of the River Windrush for the return leg. The walk is relatively flat, with just a few gentle gradients. The paths are mostly unmade and can get quite muddy after periods of rain and in the winter months. You will need to negotiate 5 stiles, some steps, several kissing gates and one cattle grid. The stiles all have adjacent dog gates or open fencing surrounds that should be suitable for most dogs. There is also some open fencing to the side of the cattle grid that dogs can slip through (although humans will have to pick their way over the grid!). There was no livestock in the fields when we crossed, but the meadows alongside the river are sometimes used for grazing so take care with dogs. There are public toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Allow 2.5 to 3 hours.
The Royal Oak, Marlow Common and Homefield Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.575804,-0.795784 A 4 mile fairly strenuous circular pub walk from The Royal Oak in Bovingdon Green near Marlow in Buckinghamshire. The Royal Oak is an award-winning dining pub with an organic interior that oozes bonhomie, it feels like someone's home and it might as well be yours for the time you're there. With red kites soaring overhead, glass in hand and a menu to savour it's a world away from the hustle and bustle of Marlow's riverside. The walking route explores the surrounding Chiltern landscape taking in peaceful sections of woodland, farmland and a long stretch of the Chiltern Way with plenty of wildlife and historical interest along the way. The route includes several climbs and descents throughout. The paths are unmade and cross farmland and woodland and so can get very muddy after rain and in the winter months. You will need to negotiate some kissing gates, V-shaped squeeze gaps and 5 stiles (all of which have gaps in the fence surrounds that should be suitable for medium-large dogs to hop through). You will be sharing a few of the fields with horses and one of the fields may be holding cattle so take care with dogs. Some of the paths are quite narrow and can get overgrown in the summer months so shorts are not recommended (unless you're immune to nettles and brambles!). Allow 2 hours.
Cathiron and Newbold On Avon Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.4057432916015,-1.34724861010909 A 7 mile circular walk starting and ending at the canal side car park at Cathiron Lane near Brinklow. The walk takes you through Little Lawford and Newbold on Avon, along quiet roads, undulating fields; with lovely views of North Warwickshire's countryside, farm tracks and bridleways, across the River Avon twice and along part of the Oxford Canal including the 200 yard long Newbold Tunnel. The walk has a few gentle slopes, the paths across fields were well defined and generally mud free even after a good rainfall over night, the canal path however can get very muddy, especially the part from Newbold to the entrance to Brinklow Marina. There are quite a few gates, several stiles (some of which are enclosed so dogs will need a lift over), two fenced bridges, and a couple of small sets of steps along the way. Several of the fields have sheep and horses, and there are geese near the lakes so take care with dogs.
Wrens Nest Yellow Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.527855,-2.095754 This is a 1.5 mile circular walk around the large limestone outcrop known as the Wrens Nest in Dudley. It starts at the car park on Wrens Hill Road and follows footpaths around the site. The site itself is a former limestone quarry that has since been recovered by nature. The walk offers some excellent views of limestone formations and outcrops and passes through broadleaved woodland. You may also be able to find fossils on the site, which you can take home with you. There are lots of context boards detailing the history of the area, which goes back 420 million years! This walk offers great views of several interesting geological formations on the site and also fantastic views across Dudley and the surrounding areas. There are no stiles on the site but there are quite a few flights of steps, only some of which have handrails and there are a few cut-throughs with a step. Some of the paths are well maintained while others are less so. Some paths will be muddy and have uneven steps. The route is very well signposted throughout - look for the yellow trilobite symbol (it looks a bit like a woodlouse).
Henrhyd Waterfall Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.795527,-3.664463 A very short easy walk (a total of less than one mile there and back) to view the beautiful Henrhyd Waterfall. There is also the opportunity to walk behind the falls if you don't mind a narrow path over wet rocks. The path down to the waterfall is fairly steep. You will need to negotiate a couple of gates, a wooden footbridge and a flight of steps. The spray from the falls can make the ground slippery so take extra care.
Craig Y Nos Castle Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.826662,-3.684314 A short circular walk showing great variety. The route will take you through Craig Y Nos Castle's former estate gardens to reach the heathy high moors of the Brecon Beacons where the paths head off into miles of wilderness. Your route then takes you across a mountain stream, past a country church and on to reach views of the valley with limestone outcrops which leads you back to the Craig Y Nos Country Park. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout, some of which are fairly steep. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates and stiles plus a set of stepping stones over a river, so take particular care at this point. There are toilets available at the car park at the start of the walk.
Woodgate Valley Country Park Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.444595,-2.009053 This is a 3 mile circular trail set in Woodgate Valley Country Park. The walk takes you along the length of the park, following the course of Bourne Brook. It encompasses sections through managed woodland along the side of a stream. The site has a variety of habitats, including woodland, wildflower meadow and the stream which the walk follows. Many species of bird can be seen here, and work is ongoing by local groups to increase the biodiversity of the area. The brook is a constant companion on this walk and is a further draw to wildlife. The walk takes place on well managed footpaths along a very flat route. Although there are no impediments to access, such as stiles or gates, only the first section of the walk (to the bridge) may be suitable for wheelchairs. Later sections may be accessible at times depending on the state of the paths. There is a visitor centre and teashop on site, with disabled toilets. There are also wheelchair accessible picnic tables and a children's play area within the country park. Allow about an hour to complete the circuit. There are a couple of bridges across the brook that will allow you to shorten the route if necessary.
Leasowes & Lapal Circular Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.454193,-2.037953 This is a 5 mile circular trail that starts at Leasowes Park in Halesowen and travels via public rights of way around Lapal, before returning to the start. Some sections of the route follow the course of the now disused section of the Dudley #2 Canal, while others cross fields and a couple of roads. The walk offers views of Leasowes Park, a short section of woodland and quiet country lanes and footpaths. There are quite a few stiles on the walk and a few flights of steps. Most of the gradients are shallow. There are also two crossings over a busy dual carriageway so take particular care at these points. A short section of the path follows the route of the Monarch's Way. There are no facilities on the walk, though there is a pub between the second and third waypoints.
Holme Pierrepont Country Park Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.938662,-1.111661 A 5 mile circular walk around the country park and water sports centre at Holme Pierrepont in Nottingham. This walk is one of the Nottingham Walks By Bus series, created to allow walkers to access some of Nottingham's best walking routes via Nottingham City Transport bus routes. The walking route is full of interest, taking in a nature reserve and the beautiful River Trent as well as the National Water Sports Centre where you'll have chance to see rowing, wakeboarding and white water kayaking. The route is almost entirely flat with just a couple of gentle slopes. The majority of the paths are surfaced, but the short stretch of stone track through the fishing lakes can get muddy at times so sturdy shoes or boots are recommended. Dogs on leads are welcome in the park and there are dog waste bins provided on the way round. You will need to negotiate one wide gate and some gaps alongside vehicle barriers (all more than one metre wide). There is one squeeze gap at the entrance to the nature reserve, but this stretch can be avoided if necessary so that the route would be suitable for rugged pushchairs and disability buggies. There are public toilets at two points around the route. Allow 2.5 hours.
Wollaton Park Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.95469,-1.19924 A 3 mile linear trail through Wollaton Park in Nottingham. This walk is one of the Nottingham Walks By Bus series, created to allow walkers to access some of Nottingham's best walking routes via Nottingham City Transport bus routes. The walking route follows the paths through the deer park and gardens of Wollaton Park, taking in the many highlights including the tree-lined avenues, the hall itself (which today houses a museum), the camellia house and the large lake. The park gates are open every day from 8am on weekdays and from 9am on weekends. The hall and gardens open a little later, around 10am or 11am depending on the time of year. Closing times are around dusk. Entry is free to the park, gardens and hall. The route has just a few gentle slopes. The majority of the paths are surfaced, but there are a couple of stretches over the grass so sturdy shoes or boots are recommended. Dogs on leads are welcome in the park/garden and there are waste bins provided on the way round. You will need to negotiate a few single gates but there are no other obstacles so the route would be suitable for rugged pushchairs and disability buggies. There are public toilets at the courtyard, about half way round the route. You will come across free roaming deer in the park so take particular care if you have a dog with you. Allow 1.5 hours.
Broxtowe Country Park Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.978436,-1.215304 A 2 mile circular walk around Broxtowe Country Park in Nottingham. This walk is one of the Nottingham Walks By Bus series, created to allow walkers to access some of Nottingham's best walking routes via Nottingham City Transport bus routes. The walking route performs a simple loop around the small country park, taking in the areas of grassland and woodland. The walk has a few gentle slopes. The majority of the paths are surfaced, but some of the woodland paths can get muddy at times so sturdy shoes or boots are recommended. Dogs are welcome in the park. The entrance/exit point for the park is a metal inverted V-shape narrow squeeze gap. There are no toilets or other facilities in the park. Allow 1 hour.
Gedling Country Park Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.98019,-1.08612 A 4.5 mile circular walk around Gedling Country Park in Nottingham. This walk is one of the Nottingham Walks By Bus series, created to allow walkers to access some of Nottingham's best walking routes via Nottingham City Transport bus routes. The walking route weaves its way through the woodlands and grasslands that make up the rich flora and fauna within the country park. The route has several climbs and descents throughout, some of which are steep and others fairly long. The paths within the park itself are all surfaced with tarmac or stone, but the access path across the playing fields and between the lakes can get very muddy. Dogs are welcome in the park, but please keep them close to the paths as the site is home to many ground nesting birds. The paths within the park are shared use with cyclists. You will need to negotiate a total of 6 V-shaped squeeze stiles to access the park from the Arnold Lane bus stop. (The walk can be adjusted to avoid all these stiles by starting/finishing at the Spring Lane entrance but the bus routes here run less frequently, particularly at weekends). There are currently no toilets or other facilities at the park. Allow 2 to 2.5 hours.
Nottingham's Hidden Treasures Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.955103,-1.158107 A 3 mile linear walk through Nottingham city centre discovering some of the hidden treasures within the city. This walk is one of the Nottingham Walks By Bus series, created to allow walkers to access some of Nottingham's best walking routes via Nottingham City Transport bus routes. The walking route explores the city streets to discover some of the more unusual attractions including a secret tunnel, the old canal and the buildings of the lace district. The walking route is fairly flat with just some gentle slopes and follows paved surfaces around the city centre. You will need to negotiate a couple of flights of steps so the route is not suitable for pushchairs or disability buggies. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
Nottingham's Heroes and Legends Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.95153,-1.146068 A 2 mile circular walk in Nottingham city centre discovering the heroes and legends associated with the city. This walk is one of the Nottingham Walks By Bus series, created to allow walkers to access some of Nottingham's best walking routes via Nottingham City Transport bus routes. The walking route explores the city streets to discover stories of figure skating, poetry, football and men in tights. The walking route is fairly flat with just some gentle slopes and follows paved surfaces around the city centre. There are no flights of steps or gates on route. Allow 1 to 1.5 hours.
3 Parks Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.443981,-1.908435 The 3 Parks Trail is a 7 mile walk around three of Birmingham's many parks - Cannon Hill, Highbury and Kings Heath. The walk follows paths through all three sites, each of which has its own character. The walk encompasses mature woodland, parks with formal flowerbeds, mature gardens, ponds, lakes and a river, mature parkland, some views of old buildings and a model of the Elan Valley reservoir system. Allow 2-3 hours to complete the walk. It follows well maintained paths for the most part, but there are some sections that will be muddy. There is also some road walking involved. There are no stiles on the route, but there are some steps/kerbs. Refreshments are available at pubs close to the route and also at the Teashop in Cannon Hill park and at the Victorian Tea Room in Kings Heath Park. Toilets are available at both locations. The gradients are generally shallow or flat.
Bosworth Battlefield and Shenton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.5972505845129,-1.40631512738764 A circular walk starting and ending at the Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Centre. The walk takes you along the Ashby De La Zouch Canal, across fields including the spot where Richard III is thought to have been slain, along some quiet roads around Shenton and across the Battlefield Line preserved railway. The route is generally fairly flat with just one steep incline from Shenton Station to the finish. The paths across the fields were well defined and showed very little mud even after a good fall of rain the day before. The canal towpath also had very little mud. You will need to negotiate many stiles and gates. There are steps down to the canal at Sutton Cheney Wharf and steps up and down as you cross the former railway line. You are likely to come across cows in one field, sheep in several other fields and a horse by the railway line, so take care with dogs. There are toilet and cafe facilities at the Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Centre, Sutton Cheney Wharf and Shenton Station.
Ashmansworth, Pilot Hill and Faccombe Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.315815,-1.404632 A 6 mile, fairly challenging circular walk through the chalk hills of the Hampshire Downs taking in the villages of Ashmansworth and Faccombe. The route follows ancient lanes and tracks through the rolling hills of farmland and woodland and crosses Pilot Hill, the highest point in Hampshire. The walk is really all about the spectacular expansive views which reach far to the north over Berkshire and Oxfordshire and south across the heart of Hampshire. The walk includes many climbs and descents throughout, a couple of which are quite steep. For the most part the walk follows ancient tracks but there are a couple of sections along quiet country lanes so take care of traffic at these points. Some of the chalk paths can become muddy and slippery when wet. You will need to negotiate two stiles; these are quite low but enclosed with wire fencing so dogs would need to hop over or be lifted. Most of the surrounding farmland is arable but you will cross one sheep pasture and there are other grazing sections to the sides of the tracks enclosed with electric fencing so take care with children and dogs. Allow 3 hours.
Sussex Hospices Trail Part 1: Chichester to Barnham Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.83221,-0.781686 A 10 mile linear walk from Chichester rail station to Barnham rail station in West Sussex, forming the first stretch of the Sussex Hospices Trail. The route passes by St Wilfrid's Hospice in Chichester before following the line of a long lost canal which once transported goods from London to Portsmouth, avoiding encounters with enemy ships in the English Channel. You will enjoy a stretch of the restored Chichester Ship Canal, several charming villages plus the rural path of the old canal as it crosses arable fields and fruit farms with plenty of wildlife to enjoy along the way. The return leg can be completed with a single 7 minute train journey. The hospices of Sussex are dedicated to providing specialist end-of-life care. Friends of Sussex Hospices has worked with partners and supporters to create the Sussex Hospices Trail, a 200 mile long-distance path to support and raise awareness of the twelve hospice care providers that serve the adults and children of Sussex. The walking route from Chichester to Barnham is almost entirely flat. The paths across farmland can be very muddy at times and can also be quite overgrown in part, so shorts are not recommended (unless you're immune to nettles!). There are a couple of sections of walking along quiet lanes (so take care of traffic for these stretches) and you will need to cross the railway at an unsignalled footpath crossing so take extreme care and listen carefully for trains before you cross. You will need to negotiate some steps, several kissing gates plus 4 stiles (most of these have large gaps alongside, but two have tighter fence surrounds that medium-large dogs should be able to pass through – our standard poodle just squeezed through). Allow 5 hours. There are no facilities or refreshments for the bulk of the route. Toilets are available at the rail stations at each end and there are pubs in the villages of Hunston (near the start of the walk) and Barnham (near the end of the walk). In dry weather, the grassy slopes of the old canal make a great place for a picnic about half way through the walk.
Sturminster Newton and Fiddleford Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.926935,-2.303607 A 3 mile circular walk from the small market town of Sturminster Newton in Dorset. The walk passes the town's museum and church before crossing the glorious riverside meadows to reach the neighbouring Fiddleford. Here you will find the remains of an old mill and manor house, the latter of which you have chance to explore. The return leg follows the track of the old rail line, leading you directly back to the car park at the start. The route is almost entirely flat with just some gentle slopes. Whilst most of the paths are well made, the riverside meadows can be very muddy at times. You will need to negotiate kissing gates and footbridges plus single plank barrier-type stiles that you will need to step over at the ends of the bridges (which are very easy for dogs to pass under). The riverside meadows are used to graze cattle so take particular care with dogs (when we walked the cattle seemed very relaxed around the dog walkers). There are public toilets available in the car park at the start of the walk. Allow 1 to 1.5 hours.
Turnworth and the Wessex Ridgeway Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.883409,-2.268387 A 5 mile fairly strenuous walk on the Dorset Downs around the village of Turnworth. The walk will take you along a beautiful ancient track, passing Bonsley Common (said to be the best place in Dorset to see bluebells in the spring) down to the village of Turnworth. From here you will follow the path back uphill through crop fields and pastures to join a stretch of the Wessex Ridgeway which leads you back to the car park. The views for most of the walk are spectacular and on a clear day you will be able to see for miles around. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout, including a couple of steep sections. The paths through woodland can get very muddy so good stout boots are a must. There is a short stretch of road walking so take care of traffic at this point. The return footpath across pastures and crops is not particularly well-defined or managed, so you may need to walk around the rough edges of crop fields and also to duck under an electric fence along the way (we have reported both these issues to the local council). You will need to negotiate several gates plus one stile (which has wire fence surrounds so dogs will need a lift over). You may be sharing one of the pastures with cattle so take care with dogs. There are no facilities or refreshments on route, but there are picnic benches alongside the car park at the start of the walk. Allow 2 to 2.5 hours.
Stokes Bay to Gilkicker Fort Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.7886906,-1.1630314 A 4 mile circular walk along the coast at Stokes Bay, Gosport, Hampshire. Some beach walking, but much along pathways and the promenade. With fantastic views of the Solent and the Isle of Wight, this walk takes you on a journey initially through Stanley Park, out to Stokes Bay and along the coast to Gilkicker Fort at the end of the bay. Great views of shipping in the Solent and shipping approaching the entrance to Portsmouth Harbour.The walk is relatively flat and there are no stiles or gates to negotiate.
Sussex Hospices Trail Part 2: Barnham to Arundel Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.831237,-0.639998 A 6 mile linear walk from Barnham rail station to Arundel rail station in West Sussex, forming the second stretch of the Sussex Hospices Trail. The route heads north across flower farms and arable fields to reach Walberton, home of The Sussex Snowdrop Trust, before continuing through woodland and arable fields to reach Arundel where you will have chance to explore the cathedral and castle. You will enjoy a charming village, enchanting woodlands and a lovely stretch of the River Arun along the way. The return leg can be completed with a single 10 minute train journey. The hospices of Sussex are dedicated to providing specialist end-of-life care. Friends of Sussex Hospices has worked with partners and supporters to create the Sussex Hospices Trail, a 200 mile long-distance path to support and raise awareness of the twelve hospice care providers that serve the adults and children of Sussex. The walking route from Barnham to Arundel has just gentle slopes for the most part, plus one steeper climb within Arundel. The paths across farmland and through woodland can be very muddy at times so stout boots are recommended (or wellingtons with grips in the wet winter months). There are a few road crossings that need care and one stretch of the route also crosses a golf course so please show respect for the golfers by allowing them to play their shots before you cross and look out for any stray flying golf balls. You will need to negotiate some steps and several kissing gates (some of which are tight so be prepared to breathe in!) but there are no stiles on route. Toilets are available at the rail stations at each end and if you are looking for refreshments there are several shops and pubs in Barnham, Walberton and Arundel. Allow 3 hours.
Granville Country Park Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.709991,-2.416877 A 4 mile circular and fairly strenuous walk discovering the delightful nature and fascinating industrial heritage of Granville Country Park near Telford in Shropshire. This nature reserve is a sprawling network of copses, heaths, grasslands, pools, scrub, wet woodlands and oak capped mounds. Relics of former industrial activity, including furnaces and an old winding house, are now surrounded by woodland full of birds, while pit mounds of waste have been transformed into flower-rich grassland and heath. You will have chance to enjoy plenty of flora and fauna, expansive views and glimpses of old mines and furnaces that helped shape the country's industrial revolution. The walk includes several climbs and descents throughout and you will need to negotiate some kissing gates plus several long steep flights of woodland steps. Many of the woodland paths can get very muddy so good boots are required and wellingtons are recommended after periods of rain and in the wet winter months. A few of the paths are narrow and can get a little overgrown. Dogs are welcome in the country park and the area is a popular dog walking spot. One small section of the park is grazed by horses for conservation at some times of year. There are no toilets or other facilities in the park. Approximate time 2 hours.
Sussex Hospices Trail Part 3: Arundel to Goring-by-Sea Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.848278,-0.546451 An 11 mile linear walk from Arundel rail station to Goring-by-Sea rail station in West Sussex, forming the third stretch of the Sussex Hospices Trail. The route takes in a short stretch of the River Arun before joining long peaceful bridleways through the woodlands of the Angmering Estate, visiting Chestnut Tree House along the way. From here it is on through more woodland, through the pretty village of Patching and then up to an old Iron Age hill fort with breathtaking views. Finally the route leads you past St Barnabas House and on through Goring-by-Sea to reach the rail station. You will enjoy elegant beech woodlands, a pretty village with charming flint cottages and panoramic views across the sea. The return leg can be completed with two train journeys or one bus journey, each taking about an hour. The hospices of Sussex are dedicated to providing specialist end-of-life care. Friends of Sussex Hospices has worked with partners and supporters to create the Sussex Hospices Trail, a 200 mile long-distance path to support and raise awareness of the twelve hospice care providers that serve the adults and children of Sussex. The walking route from Arundel to Goring-by-Sea has gentle slopes throughout, plus just a couple of steeper gradients. The paths are firm and wide for the most part, but the unmade woodland bridleways can get very muddy at times and a couple of the narrow paths can get overgrown with nettles. There are a few road crossings that need care and the route also includes an unsignalled rail crossing, so take particular care here to listen and look for trains before you cross. You will need to negotiate some steps, kissing gates and 5 stiles. All but one of the stiles will be easy for dogs to pass through and the one in question can be avoided quite easily. A couple of the fields you cross are likely to be holding cattle so take particular care with dogs. Toilets are available at Arundel rail station at the start of the walk. If you are looking for refreshments there is a pub, The Worlds End, at about the 7 mile mark and there are several shops near Goring-by-Sea station at the end of the walk. Allow 5.5 hours.
Fairoak Valley Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.75174,-1.974538 A 3 mile circular walk through Fairoak Valley within Cannock Chase. The trail takes you through the woodland valley taking in the pools and streams with plenty of wildlife along the way. The walk has just a few gentle gradients and follows wide stone tracks the whole way round. There are no gates or stiles on route, but you will need to cross some stepping stones. These are very big and flat with only narrow gaps between and so should be easy for most people to cross. The stream that the stepping stones cross is usually very shallow so you would be able to walk through this instead if you are wearing wellingtons. You will be sharing the tracks with cyclists, horse riders and segway riders. There are toilets and a cafe (dog-friendly) within the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Greenhow and Nidderdale Way Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.075282,-1.804351 A 6.5 mile circular walk from the village of Greenhow in North Yorkshire, within the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The route follows paths and stone tracks across the areas of high pasture and moorland, passing through the remains of several old lead mines. The strenuous route rewards you with marvellous views across the bleak moorland which is dissected by several streams and the remote area is also home to plenty of birds including curlews, lapwings and snipes. These high moorlands are very exposed so ensure you are properly prepared with clothing, water, food, a map, a compass and other essentials. The walk has many long climbs and descents throughout. The paths are a mixture of stone tracks, quiet lanes and moorland paths, the latter of which can get very slippery and muddy in wet weather and winter. You will need to negotiate several gates, a shallow ford crossing, some steps plus a couple of squeeze stiles and one stone wall stile (which you cross twice). The stiles should be easy for most dogs to negotiate. About 90 percent of the route crosses moorland that is grazed by sheep so please be sure to close all gates and remember that dogs will need to stay on a short lead throughout. A couple of the pastures may also be holding cattle, so take care with dogs in these sections. There are no toilets or refreshments on route. Approximate time 3.5 hours.
Hackfall Explorer Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.192894,-1.647605 A 4 mile circular and fairly strenuous trail around the woodland of Hackfall, near Masham in North Yorkshire. The magic of Hackfall is undeniable. From a castle and follies to wonderful old trees, Hackfall is steeped in history. Its unique buildings sit alongside waterfalls and ponds in an ancient woodland teeming with life. The walk includes several steep hills throughout, including some flights of uneven woodland steps. The narrow woodland paths are mostly unmade, are uneven with tree roots and rocks and can get very muddy in part so sturdy boots are required. Some of the narrow paths high on the gorge sides sit alongside steep drops down to the gorge bottom, so the route is not recommended for the faint-hearted. You will need to negotiate some steps and kissing gates, plus two stiles (with purpose-built adjacent dog gates). The stiles can be avoided if you aim to finish your walk between 11am and 3pm. One field at the start and finish of the route may be holding sheep, but otherwise the route is free of livestock. Entry to the woodland is free and dogs are welcome. There are no refreshments, toilets or other facilities on site. Approximate time 2 to 3 hours.
Skipton Castle Woods Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.962322,-2.016528 A 2 mile pretty woodland walk from the small market town of Skipton in North Yorkshire. The route follows the canal out of the town to reach Skipton Castle Woods, once used to provide timber, fuel and food for the castle, while its waterways powered local wool and saw mills, as well as being a source of fish. The route follows a mix of wide stone tracks, tarmac paths and unmade woodland paths, the latter of which can get very muddy. A couple of sections lead you up the steep valley sides and you will need to negotiate steep flights of steps in these parts, plus a few gates elsewhere on the route. One of the valley top paths has a steep drop to the side so please take care here. Dogs are welcome in the woodland. There are toilets and plenty of options for refreshments in the centre of Skipton, where the walk begins. Approximate time 1 hour.
Grassington Meadows and the River Wharfe Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.069178,-1.997447 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the small market town of Grassington in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales. The walk explores the grass meadows and pastures to the north of the town in the limestone area of Wharfedale before returning alongside the River Wharfe, pausing to enjoy the watery spectacle of Linton Falls. The walk has several steady climbs and descents throughout and follows unmade field paths which can be muddy at times. You will need to negotiate some gates plus a total of 18 stiles along the way. The majority of the stiles are stone wall stiles (which should be straightforward for most people and dogs) and stone wall squeeze stiles (many of which are very narrow and so may be difficult for broader people and dogs). There is also one standard fence stile (with adjacent dog gate) plus a tall wooden ladder stile (which less agile people may find difficult and dogs will need a hand over). You will be sharing many of the pastures with sheep and cattle so take care with dogs. There are toilets and refreshments available in Grassington at the start of the walk. Approximate time 2 hours (longer if there is a group of you, which will mean queuing for the multitude of stiles).
Old Gang Smelt Mill and Reeth High Moor Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.393961,-2.018198 A 6 mile circular walk across the Reeth High Moor in the Swaledale area of the Yorkshire Dales. The route visits the remains of the largest lead smelting complex in the Dales, now a Scheduled Ancient Monument, before climbing high onto the Reeth High Moor for the return leg. These high moorlands are very exposed so please do ensure you are properly prepared with warm clothing and other essentials. The route has several steady but long climbs and descents and follows a stone track bridleway the whole way round. You will need to negotiate a couple of wide gates but there are no steps or stiles on the route. The first two miles of the track is at least 2m wide, is compacted with a well-compacted aggregate and the steepest gradient is 1:10, making it suitable for rugged pushchairs or disability buggies. The rest of the route climbs a bit more steeply, is more uneven, and crosses a couple of shallow fords but in good conditions may also be suitable for the most rugged types of buggies should you be up for the challenge. You will be sharing the paths with sheep for the entire walk. The high moor is used for grouse shooting and the season for this runs from 12 August to 10 December each year. There are no toilets or other refreshments on route. Approximate time 3 hours.
Bronte Country: Haworth Moor and Top Withins Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.830982,-1.967508 A 7.5 mile circular walk around the moorland to the west of Haworth in West Yorkshire. The Bronte Sisters wrote most of their novels whilst living at Haworth Parsonage, when their father was parson at the local church. The route takes in sections of the Bronte Way and Pennine Way, visiting the sisters' moorland haunts including Bronte Bridge and Waterfall (where the sisters were said to take turns sitting and writing their first novels) and Top Withins (the ruined farmhouse reputedly the setting for the farmstead Wuthering Heights). Aside from the literary connections, you will be able to enjoy long stretches of high moorland which blooms into a bright purple in mid to late summer and is criss-crossed by pretty streams. The route has several long and steady climbs and descents, plus one short steeper climb. The paths are a mixture of stone and flagstone moorland paths plus some unmade sections that can get muddy at times. Many sections are rocky and uneven so sturdy boots are recommended and the area is quite exposed so ensure you have warm clothing with you. You will need to negotiate a couple of kissing gates plus one squeeze stile and some stepping stones across a stream. You will be sharing the moorland paths with sheep for the majority of the route and with Highland Cattle (which seemed very relaxed when we passed through) for a short stretch, so take care with dogs. There are no toilet facilities or refreshments available on route, but there are plenty of places for a picnic. Approximate time 4 hours.
Oakworth to Oxenhope Steam Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.841399,-1.94192 A 2.5 mile linear walk between two stations on the Keighley and Worth Valley heritage railway in West Yorkshire. The journey in the opposite direction can be completed with a train ride (on a steam train if you plan ahead in the summer months) but the heritage railway timetable varies greatly across the seasons so check train times carefully before you set out. The walk takes you past several of the landmarks that you may recognise from the 1970 film The Railway Children as well as enjoying long peaceful stretches of path alongside the beautiful Bridgehouse Beck. The walk has just a few gentle slopes along the way. The route follows a mixture of paved and unmade paths, some parts of which can get muddy and some sections of which are very narrow. You will need to negotiate some steps, some (tight!) kissing gates and a couple of stone squeeze gaps but there are no stiles on route. You will be sharing some of the paths with horses and sometimes with other livestock so take care with dogs. There are toilets and refreshments available at Oxenhope Station. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
Hardcastle Crags and Hebden Water Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.758647,-2.018814 A 3 mile circular walk around the wooded Pennine valley of Hardcastle Crags, near Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire. Owned by the National Trust the valley comprises a beautiful shallow river, Hebden Water with steep wooded valley sides and you will have chance to discover lots of wildlife plus some industrial archaeology along the way. If you have children with you, you may wish to bring along crayons and paper as there are several engraved markers around the site, showing the various leaves and seeds in the woodland. The walk follows a mixture of dirt and rocky paths, which can be muddy in part and can also be very slippery when wet. There are no gates or stiles on route but you will need to negotiate several flights of steps and some uneven climbs through sections of rocks. The outward leg largely follows the riverside path whilst the return journey climbs steeply up to the valley top ridge which has steep drops down to the side. If you would rather avoid this part, you can choose to return via the valley's quiet vehicle track or back along the riverside path, the way you came. Dogs are welcome in the site. There are picnic tables in several places along the route and there are public toilets at the start and about half way round. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Wycoller Panopticon Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.849688,-2.096686 A 2 mile circular walk around Wycoller Country Park in Pendle, Lancashire. The walk begins at the Panopticon, a modern structure that acts as both a sheltered viewing point and a beautiful object in the landscape. The route takes in hillside sheep pastures, the pretty Wycoller Beck with its beautiful old bridges and the remains of Wycoller Hall, believed to have been the inspiration for Ferndean Manor, in Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre. IMPORTANT NOTE: The footpath across the hillside pasture between Fosters Leap and Parson Lee farms can be very boggy at times and can pose a danger of walkers getting stuck when at its wettest. For this reason, this walk is best reserved for the drier months of the year (when you will probably not even see a drop of mud). The walk has a gradual descent at the start of the walk and the equivalent climb at the end. You will need to negotiate several kissing gates, steps and a couple of narrow footbridges but there are no stiles. You will be sharing many of the pastures with sheep so take care with dogs. There are public toilets at the picnic site about two-thirds of the way round. Approximate time 1 hour.
Dent and the Dales Way Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.278665,-2.455916 A 7 mile circular walk from the quaint Yorkshire Dales village of Dent in the south-east corner of Cumbria. The walk climbs high into the surrounding hills, following a beautiful old track across the top ridge with magnificent views across Dentdale and then descending through classic sheep pastures. The return leg follows a section of the River Dee, part of the Dales Way, taking in riverside pastures and hay meadows with plenty of wildlife to enjoy. The walk includes one quite long and steep ascent to start, followed by a much more gradual descent and finishing with a relatively flat stretch. Some sections are very high and exposed so ensure you have appropriate clothing with you. The paths are a mixture of stone paths/tracks and unmade paths through fields, the latter of which can get very muddy. You will need to negotiate several gates, kissing gates, steps and footbridges plus two tight stone squeeze gaps (humans and dogs may need to breathe in!) and two stiles (one of which is enclosed with wire fencing so dogs may need a lift over). You will be sharing many of the fields with sheep and cattle so take particular care with dogs. There are public toilets available in the car park at the beginning of the walk. Approximate time 3.5 hours.
Conflict between Ridiculous and Sublime Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.429834,-0.322143 The walk starts in the streets of Teddington, a suburbanised ‘village', taking in some popular culture trivia (verging on the ridiculous), then meanders through Bushy Park, second largest of the royal parks. Here is a concentration of more recent history, much of it relating to ‘conflict' (especially WWII and the influence of ingenuity on the art of war). Mixed in are some nuggets from posh peoples' pasts and one or two minor struggles of the proletariat. On the far side of the park we attain the sublime, in the form of Hampton Court, a very grand former royal palace and home to some serious stiffs, amongst the intellectual and artistic greats of the past. IMPORTANT NOTE: One part of the walk follows paths through the Woodland Gardens within Bushy Park. Dogs are NOT allowed in these gardens. A Brief History: Left to its own devices a large river, nearing its mouth, will carve out a broad flat valley for itself, meandering over centuries back and forth across the valley bottom and laying down the soil beloved of farmers. The lower Thames is no exception, flowing through a wide flat valley formed first as a sideshow from the Alps mountain-building episode, then by the Anglian epoch Ice Age event. This latter caused the river to change its seaward route from north of the Chilterns to its present southern course through the London Basin. Jumping forward a few thousand years to the Middle Ages, greedy locals (farmers, fishermen and particularly millers) began to stop the river's wanderings with banks and mills and weirs, fixing its route for ever. Wealth came to the area due to London's proximity, also attracting rich and important people. Around this same period powerful landowners worked hard to protect their parcels of the most desirable land, enclosing them with fences and walls. The deer park, which later became the royal park, was first fully enclosed by Cardinal Wolsey in 1514 but much further jinking and weaving over the next two hundred years enlarged Bushy Park and Home Park to their present sizes. Finally, kick-started by the arrival of the railways, capitalism moved in, to make more money from the land by burying whatever they could buy under a weight of buildings. Fortunately for the diversity of this walk no single powerful group was able to have its own way entirely so elements of this whole process survive and can be glimpsed everywhere. But this walk through history follows these processes backwards through time (approximately).
Hurstbourne Tarrant and Doles Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.27338,-1.449158 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the beautiful village of Hurstbourne Tarrant in Hampshire. The walking route climbs steadily to join paths through the beautiful Doles Wood, a beech woodland which is awash with flowers in the spring. The return leg leads you through quiet lanes, rural sheep pastures, along woodland tracks and through the idyllic village streets, with lovely views throughout. The route includes one long climb and the equivalent descent. The path surfaces are field and woodland tracks which can be very muddy after periods of rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate three stiles. When we walked the route, the gate alongside one of these stiles was unlocked and one had an adjacent dog gap, leaving only one fairly low stile that dogs will need to climb or be lifted over. You may be sharing one of the fields with sheep so take care with dogs. There is one short section along a quiet country lane and you will also need to cross the A343 twice so please take care of traffic at these points. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Stetchworth Stud Farms: Wildlife and Horses Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.1977153,0.4016445 Stetchworth is 3 miles south of Newmarket and is surrounded by woodland, farmland and stud farms, whose paddocks form an oasis in the agricultural monoculture of East Anglia. While this is not an area of outstanding natural beauty, it does offer a quiet backwater with attractive countryside, a host of wildlife and plenty of horses. This circular walk encourages you to look for the wildlife (especially birds) that you may encounter along the route. Details of what to look for are included at the end of each section. It is possible (on a good day) to record 50 species of birds, 3 species of deer and foxes etc. In addition, badgers can be seen walking some of the same paths if you linger by the woodland sections at dusk. Both the Icknield Way Trail and Stour Valley Path pass through the village of Stetchworth and some sections of this walk follow the route of these long distance waymarked trails. The route is generally easy, with footpaths that are usually well maintained. However, some short sections can get overgrown with bushes, thistles or brambles until they are cleared in late summer/autumn. In winter, the underlying bolder clay can become wet and sticky so stout footwear is required. The Stetchworth locale is at its best in April and May, when the paths dry out, the vegetation is short and the birds are all singing! The terrain is gently undulating with some gentle slopes that should not deter anyone of average fitness. There are five kissing gates, three of which are negotiated twice - there and back. One section follows a very quiet country lane, but those who want to avoid this can use a short cut that is mentioned in the route details. Dogs: All the Stud Farms along the route ask dog owners to keep dogs on a lead. In addition, you might encounter horses and riders along parts of the route so it is important that dogs are kept under close control. Ordnance Survey Maps: Explorer 210 (recommended), Landranger 154.
Sussex Hospices Trail Part 4: Goring-by-Sea to Shoreham-by-Sea Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.817682,-0.433336 A 9 mile linear seafront walk from Goring-by-Sea railway station to Shoreham-by-Sea railway station in West Sussex, forming the fourth stretch of the Sussex Hospices Trail. The walk is almost entirely along the coast with varied seafront pathways and promenades and fantastic views of the sea throughout. The hospices of Sussex are dedicated to providing specialist end-of-life care. Friends of Sussex Hospices has worked with partners and supporters to create the Sussex Hospices Trail, a 200 mile long-distance path to support and raise awareness of the twelve hospice care providers that serve the adults and children of Sussex. The route goes down, heading south, to the seafront from Goring-by-Sea and then follows the coastline, in an easterly direction, all the way along through Worthing to Shoreham-by-Sea with magnificent views of the English Channel. It is on entirely flat surfaces which vary from suburban pavement, a pretty woodland path, seafront path, a promenade, a short stretch along a pavement next to a busy road before returning to paved seafront footpaths. There is an option for some pebble beach walking. There are a few road crossings that need care, but no stiles to negotiate, just one short flight of steps. Toilets and refreshment stops are plentiful along the route. The return leg can be completed by one train journey or a bus journey. Allow 5 hours.
The Rose and Crown Stroude Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.40149,-0.548385 A circular pub walk of just more than 4 miles from The Rose and Crown in Thorpe, Surrey. The Rose and Crown is a chocolate box pub with beautifully kept gardens, ideal for al-fresco dining in the summer months. The walking route heads out along bridleways to reach the old lane up to Whitehall Farm, where you will have magnificent views across the peaceful countryside. The return leg crosses fields, woodlands and follows part of an ancient sunken lane on the way back to Thorpe. The walk is fairly flat for the most part, with just a couple of slopes. The track through the derelict Whitehall Farm and the field immediately after this are heavy clay and can be sitting in a few inches of water in the winter, so the route is best reserved for the dry summer months (if you do walk after wet weather or in winter you will need wellingtons with grips). A couple of short sections can be overgrown in summer so shorts are not recommended (unless you are immune to nettles!). You will need to negotiate several kissing gates and one stile (which has an open fence surround for dogs to pass through). One of the fields you cross is likely to be holding cattle so take care with dogs. The walk also crosses a couple of roads plus a railway at an unsignalled crossing point so look and listen for trains carefully before you cross. Approximate time 2 hours.
The Prae Wood Arms and Verulamium Park Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.760661,-0.36307 IMPORTANT NOTE: The Prae Wood Arms is currently closed for refurbishment and will open at 5pm on Thursday 23 June 2016. A 5.5 mile circular pub walk from The Prae Wood Arms in St Albans, Hertfordshire. The Prae Wood Arms is a lovely spacious pub, with a tempting menu made from fresh, local produce. The walking route leads you through the beautiful meadows of the Gorhambury Estate before touring Verulamium Park, the former site of the Roman town that pre-dates St Albans. You will have chance to visit the Verulamium Museum and St Albans Cathedral along the way, whilst enjoying impressive Roman remains and the idyllic chalk stream, the River Ver. The walk has several gentle climbs and descents throughout. The majority of the route follows surfaced driveways and paths, with just a one-mile stretch along unmade woodland and grass paths within the park (which can get a bit soft or muddy). There are no stiles, steps, kissing gates or livestock on route, just a handful of single pedestrian gates. With this in mind the route would be suitable for a rugged pushchair. The paths through Gorhambury Estate (at the start and end of the route) are permissive paths that are open from 8am to 6pm for the majority of the year. These paths are closed every Saturday from 1 September to 31 January (whilst private game shoots take place) and also on a few days for special events (check www.gorhamburyestate.co.uk for any planned closures). When the estate paths are closed, the walk can still be completed by using the alternative route on the pavements alongside the main road. Allow 3 hours.
The Breiddens: Moel Y Golfa Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.701667,-3.060903 This is a 2.5 mile walk around the ridge of Moel Y Golfa, a hill in the Breiddens range near to Trewern, Powys. The hill will be a familiar sight to anyone who has driven along the A458 between Welshpool and Shrewsbury, as it dominates the nearby landscape. An especially good view of the hill can be seen on the approach from Welshpool, just before the railway bridge. The walk commences part of the way up the hill in a layby and follows footpaths across the ridge before heading down through quiet woodland, passing a disused quarry and then returning to the start. The views are spectacular, however, and you can see for quite a distance as the hill is over 400m (1,300ft) high. This walk has some quite steep sections and in a couple of places you will be required to scramble up a short rock face. The path itself is generally clear, though fingerposts are few and far between. There are no facilities on route but the village of Trewern is nearby.
Kingfisher on the Quay Waterside Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.297254,-0.737544 A 4 mile circular pub walk from Kingfisher on the Quay in Mytchett, Surrey. Tucked away alongside a beautiful lake, Kingfisher on the Quay is the perfect location for eats or libation, sit on the deck and enjoy the lake or relax inside by the roaring fires. The walking route takes you through the sprawling local villages and wildlife corridors, with chance to discover the River Blackwater and the Basingstoke Canal in all their glory. The walking route is relatively flat, with just a couple of gentle slopes. Most of the paths are surfaced and firm, but the towpath along the Basingstoke Canal is unmade and can get muddy after periods of rain and in the winter months. There are no stiles or kissing gates on route, just a couple of flights of steps and few bridle gates. You will need to cross a railway at an unsignalled crossing point so look and listen for trains carefully before you cross. There are a few sections of road walking but these are through residential areas and all have pavements. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
The Onslow Arms Park and Woodland Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.260965,-0.503606 A 5 mile circular pub walk from The Onslow Arms in West Clandon, Surrey. The Onslow Arms is a smart community pub where drinkers and eaters alike get a warm welcome on the terrace, in the walled garden or alongside the real fires inside. The walking route performs a simple circuit around the surrounding Surrey countryside, taking in the grounds of Clandon Park, immaculate golf courses and majestic stretches of woodland. The walk has just a few gentle gradients. The paths are wide and open for the most part, but the optional narrow stretch within West Clandon can get overgrown in summer and the woodland paths can be very muddy after rain and in winter. You will need to negotiate a few single gates, kerbs and footbridges, but there are no steps or stiles on route. The first (and last stretch) follows the road through West Clandon but this has a pavement and traffic, whilst busy, is limited to 30mph. There are a couple of road crossings, so take particular care at these points. Two of the fields you cross are horse paddocks so take care with dogs. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
Lilleshall Discovery Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.727564,-2.372557 IMPORTANT NOTE: As this site is a designated National Sports Centre, DOGS are currently NOT ALLOWED in the grounds or gardens of Lilleshall. Should this position change in the future, we will remove this note. A 2.5 mile (4km) circular walk around the beautiful gardens and grounds of Lilleshall National Sports and Conferencing Centre near Telford in Shropshire. Set in spectacular and secluded surroundings, Lilleshall is one of the UK's National Sports Centres, training grounds and centres of excellence for the country's leading sportsmen and women. Originally built as a country house and hunting lodge for the Duke of Sutherland, you will have chance to discover Lilleshall's many gems including the Italian water garden, the pet cemetery and the world-class sport facilities. The walk includes just a couple of gentle slopes and you will also need to negotiate a couple of gates plus several flights of steps. The majority of the route follows surfaced paths, but the parts through the wild sections of meadow can get a little muddy at times. There is a cafe bar, Queens Bar, at the start of the route to allow you to enjoy refreshments before or after your walk. Please note that dogs are NOT allowed in the grounds. You are likely to come across free roaming peacocks within the grounds. Approximate time 1 hour.
Lilleshall Adventure Fitness Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.727517,-2.37258 IMPORTANT NOTE: As this site is a designated National Sports Centre, DOGS are currently NOT ALLOWED in the grounds or gardens of Lilleshall. Should this position change in the future, we will remove this note. A 6 mile (10km) circular walk around the beautiful gardens and grounds of Lilleshall National Sports and Conferencing Centre near Telford in Shropshire. Set in spectacular and secluded surroundings, Lilleshall is one of the UK's National Sports Centres, training grounds and centres of excellence for the country's leading sportsmen and women. This 10km route gives you chance to test your fitness, taking you through the woodland belts alongside the estate's 2 mile sweeping drive, before returning (a steady climb all the way!) to explore the heart of the estate. You will have chance to discover Lilleshall's many gems including the golden gates (an exact replica of those at Buckingham Palace), the Italian water garden, the pet cemetery and the world-class sport facilities. The walk includes one long, steady descent and the equivalent ascent and you will also need to negotiate a couple of gates plus several flights of steps. The route follows a mixture of garden surfaced paths and un-made woodland and meadow paths, the latter of which can be uneven underfoot and very muddy at times. One section of the route follows a quiet country lane, so take care of any occasional traffic here. There is a cafe bar, Queens Bar, at the start of the route to allow you to enjoy refreshments before or after your walk. Please note that dogs are NOT allowed in the grounds. You are likely to come across free roaming peacocks within the grounds. Approximate time 3 hours.
The Cock and Greyhound Whitchurch Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.971138,-2.685876 A 5 mile circular pub walk from The Cock and Greyhound in Whitchurch, Shropshire. The Cock and Greyhound, one of the oldest inns in Whitchurch, is a beautifully restored British pub serving local cask ales, food from local farms and producers, and quality affordable wines, in all its proud glory. The walking route heads north through farmland and a golf course before returning alongside the Shropshire Union Canal, taking in sections of the South Cheshire Way and the Sandstone Trail along the way. There's lots of variety on route with wildlife, boatlife, farmlife and golf-life to enjoy on your journey. The route has a few steady climbs and descents throughout but there are no particularly steep sections. The paths can be very muddy in winter and some parts can be a little overgrown in the summer so shorts are not recommended (unless you're immune to nettles). You will need to negotiate several gates plus 7 stiles (some of which are entirely enclosed with wire fencing so dogs will need a lift over). You will be sharing some of the fields with sheep and cattle so take particular care with dogs. The canal is deep and busy with boat traffic so take care with young children on this part. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
Oswestry and River Morda Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.858397,-3.05437 A 3.5 mile circular walk from the market town of Oswestry in Shropshire. The walking route heads out from the centre of town, through fields and pastures to reach the pretty River Morda, following it for a short stretch before returning to the town via quiet lanes and more pastures. There are lovely views along the way and an assortment of wildlife to enjoy. The walk has several steady gradients throughout, plus one short steeper climb. The path surfaces through fields and pastures can be very muddy after periods of rain and in winter, and a couple of sections can be overgrown in the height of summer. There are a few kissing gates to negotiate plus 3 stiles (one of which is enclosed with narrow wooden fencing so larger dogs would need a lift over). You may be sharing several of the pastures with cattle so take particular care with dogs. There are public toilets within the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
The Legends of Stiperstones Ridge Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.573502,-2.931888 A 3 mile circular walk taking in Stiperstones Ridge in Shropshire, a quartzite ridge formed around 500 million years ago. The walk is a must if you are in the area on a clear day, revealing spectacular geology, impressive panoramic views, wildlife-rich upper heathland and a wealth of myths and legends. The walk up to the ridge is a decent, fairly steep climb and the ridge-top path is awkward terrain being an uneven rocky surface that will test the strength of your ankles. However if you are fit enough, it's worth the effort to get up close to the quartzite tors and for the amazing view. The top of the ridge is very exposed so please do not attempt the walk in fog and make sure you wear appropriate clothing. There are no stiles on route, just a few single gates. Dogs are welcome within the Stiperstones National Nature Reserve but must be kept on leads to protect the ground-nesting birds. The return path crosses two large fields that are likely to be holding cattle, so take care with dogs. (When we walked one of these fields held cows, calves and a bull; the path is well walked and the cattle seemed relaxed with our dog – but do take the usual care). For those who can't manage the climb, there is also an all-ability wide, level and wheelchair-friendly path from the car park which still gives great views – simply follow the iFootpath map in reverse, heading ‘there and back' to Waypoint 4. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours.
Wantage and Letcombe Regis Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.587037,-1.427555 A 6 mile circular walk from the market town of Wantage in Oxfordshire. The walk follows an ancient path out to the nearby village of Letcombe Regis, famous for its links to horse racing, then heads north along bridleways before returning to Wantage along the disused Berks and Wilts Canal. There is plenty of historical interest, pretty settlements as well as lots of wildlife to enjoy as you make your way through this part of the North Wessex Downs. The walk has a few gentle gradients throughout. The paths are mainly surfaced footpaths and old track byways. There are no gates or steps on route, just one single stile to negotiate (which has an adjacent dog gate). The byways between Letcombe Regis and the canal are heavy clay, are deeply rutted with vehicle tracks and can be muddy all year round (so boots are required and wellingtons with grips are recommended in the wetter months). There are public toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Approximate time 3 hours.
Aldermaston Wharf and Padworth Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.400549,-1.134788 A 3 mile circular walk from Aldermaston Wharf in West Berkshire. The walk starts at the visitor centre on the Kennet and Avon Canal before joining rural tracks and paths across several waterways and fields to reach the adjacent village of Padworth with a beautiful church, imposing mansion house and old parkland. The return leg follows a pretty stretch of the River Kennet. The walk is relatively flat with just a couple of very gentle slopes. The paths follow unmade tracks and grass paths across fields, parkland and alongside the river, all of which can be very muddy after rain and in the winter months. You will need to negotiate several gates, narrow footbridges and one stile (which is very low and also has open fence surrounds to allow dogs to pass through). You will be sharing a couple of the fields with horses and one field occasionally holds cattle, so take particular care with dogs. Allow 1.5 hours.
The Three Horseshoes Laleham Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.408057,-0.488571 A 4 mile circular pub walk from the Three Horseshoes in Laleham, Surrey. The Three Horseshoes is a friendly independent pub that's casual enough to be comfortable, whilst smart enough to feel special. The walking route takes in the village highlights, the peaceful Penton Hook Island, a long stretch of the Thames Path and Laleham Park. There is plenty of historical interest, lots of wildlife and boatlife to enjoy on the Thames and even a chance for a paddle. The walking route is almost entirely flat. Whilst half the paths are surfaced, the other half are across grass and dirt paths which can be muddy in the winter months and after periods of rain. There are no stiles or kissing gates on route, just one single gate (which is quite generous) and several fairly wide footbridges to negotiate. (Only one of the bridges, across the lock gates, has a single step up to it so the route would be suitable for a rugged pushchair). Dogs are welcome on the permissive paths on Penton Hook Island and a dog waste bin is provided here. Approximate time 2 hours.
St Mary Bourne and Derrydown Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.250735,-1.397273 A circular walk of just less than 3 miles from the pretty village of St Mary Bourne in Hampshire. This lovely route belies its simplicity and length, giving you chance to explore a range of environments including the chocolate box village streets plus tracks through woodland, open crop fields and rural pastures. The route includes a steady climb and equivalent descent on the valley side. Most of the paths follow stone and tarmac tracks, but there are sections through woodland that can get very muddy after periods of rain. There is one stretch along a quiet country lane and one through the village where there are no pavements, so take care of any traffic at these points. There are no stiles, steps or kissing gates on route, just one generous single gate, meaning the route would be passable with a rugged pushchair or disability buggy when the ground is firm enough. Approximate time 1 hour.
The Pheasant and Reigate Heath Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.243213,-0.240362 A 3 mile circular pub walk from the Pheasant at Buckland, near Reigate in Surrey. The Pheasant is a classic old coaching inn, providing relaxed comfortable surroundings for refreshments before or after your walk. The walking route explores the adjoining Reigate Heath, a wonderful section of mixed woodland and heath, taking in a windmill and a stream which is home to a monstrous creature of legend. The walking route includes just a few climbs and descents. There are no stiles, steps or gates on route, but the path surfaces can be very sandy, deeply rutted or muddy in parts and they are also very narrow at times. The heath is home to a golf course and the route crosses fairways a few times so please show respect for the golfers by allowing them to play their shots before you cross and also look out for any stray flying golf balls. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours.
The Falcon Shotteswell and Horley Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.115855,-1.39976 A 6 mile circular pub walk from The Falcon near Warmington in Warwickshire. The Falcon boasts fine food, an extensive list of spirits, wines and local beers and an outstanding view across the local countryside. The walking route explores this rural corner of Warwickshire and adjacent Oxfordshire, taking in the rolling landscape of pastures, crop fields and quaint villages. You will enjoy a remarkably peaceful journey, belying the walk's proximity to towns and motorways, across beautiful countryside and with glorious views throughout. The route includes many climbs and descents throughout and, combined with the soft and uneven ground underfoot, this will give you quite a workout. The paths across the crop fields and pastures can be very muddy at times and can be also quite narrow or overgrown in parts, so good boots and long trousers are recommended (plus a change of shoes for the pub). You will need to negotiate several steps, footbridges and kissing gates plus 14 stiles. About half of the stiles are enclosed with wire fencing so dogs will need a lift over these ones. You will cross several pastures holding cattle, a couple holding sheep and one horse paddock (which was also holding a pair of pigs when we walked). The route requires you to cross a fairly busy B-road twice and also leads you across a small grass airstrip, so take particular care at these points. Approximate time 3 to 3.5 hours.
Home Farm Woodland Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.178072,-1.058552 A 3 mile circular woodland trail exploring Home Farm Wood near the hamlet of Burkham in Hampshire. As the name suggests, the site was once the farm for the local estate of Burkham Manor. Today, it is a nature reserve managed by the Woodland Trust and is a charming combination of open grassland glades and broadleaf woodland. The walk has just a few gentle gradients and the paths can be very muddy so boots are a must and wellingtons are recommended in the winter months. There are no stiles or steps on route, but you will need to negotiate a number of kissing gates. Dogs are welcome in the woodland, indeed it is a very popular dog walking spot. A small herd of docile cattle are used to graze the site as part of the conservation. The cattle are only ever in one section of the woodland at a time, and this will be marked with signs, so if you do see them (you may not as they can be very elusive!) please keep a safe distance, especially with dogs. There are no toilets or other facilities on the route. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Arundel and Amberley Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.848033,-0.546668 Hi, I'm Georgina and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk. We're heading to Arundel, my dad grew up there and it's the perfect place to get away from our hectic life in the city; a castle, the river and beautiful countryside, just a train ride from home, perfect. To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. The full walk is 12 miles but if that sounds too much for you, there's an option to shorten it to 7.5 miles. The route has a few climbs and descents including a long climb over the South Downs ridge. Almost all the paths can be muddy and in the wetter months the South Downs are often thick with chalky clay, so good boots are a must. You will need to negotiate several sets of steps, kissing gates and 12 stiles (all of which have open fence surrounds suitable for dogs to pass through). There are a couple of stretches along quiet roads and you will also need to cross the railway at an unsignalled crossing, so take particular care at these points. You will be sharing several of the meadows and fields with both cattle and sheep. Allow 6 hours for the walk plus extra time for the pit stops, so ideally you should allow the whole day.
Cissbury Ring and Stump Bottom Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.864998,-0.382514 Hi there! Adele here and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk. It's a great 5 mile loop around Cissbury Ring, the largest hill fort in Sussex, near to the tiny village of Findon. The effort of getting to the top of Cissbury Ring is always worthwhile and on a clear, sunny day I'm rewarded with a changing vista in every direction. To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout and the bridleway tracks can be muddy and slippery with the chalk clay, so good boots are a must. The first half of the walk follows fenced bridleways between fields (which you will be sharing with cyclists) and the second half explores the National Trust site of Cissbury Ring, which sometimes has livestock grazing. Dogs are welcome in Cissbury Ring, in fact it's a great place for your furry friend to meet other dogs. You will need to negotiate a couple of kissing gates and a few steps but there are no stiles on route. The high paths are very exposed so wrap up warm in the colder months. Allow 2.5 hours.
Amberley and the River Arun Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.896838,-0.541544 Hi, I'm Kelly and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk. My two sisters live in Sussex so it's a great excuse to head down and spend time with them while exploring all that the area has to offer. This 3.5 mile walk from Amberley is ideal as a short stroll mixed with plenty of chatting and eating. To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. The first half of the walk is flat and follows riverside paths that can be very muddy and waterlogged in the wetter months so good boots are a must and wellingtons are recommended in winter. The second half follows quiet lanes and includes a fairly steep ascent and equivalent descent back to the village. You will need to negotiate 7 stiles along the way (all of which have gaps alongside for dogs to pass through) and there is also a pedestrian rail crossing on route so take particular care at this point. You may come across cattle within some of the riverside meadows. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours.
East Grinstead and the High Weald Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.126485,-0.017257 Hi, I'm Tom and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk. I live and work in London but often head out of town to catch up with my dad, meeting up wherever his travels take him. My dad's latest trip was to East Grinstead and a quick bit of research tells me it's on the edge of the High Weald AONB. It's a patchwork of small farms and woodlands, sunken lanes, parkland and tiny villages. To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout. The paths across farm pastures can be very muddy so good boots are required and wellingtons are recommended in the wettest months. The majority of the paths are wide and well walked, with just a couple of short stretches that can be a little overgrown. You will need to negotiate several footbridges, kissing gates and 4 stiles (all of which have dog-size gaps alongside). You are likely to come across cattle and sheep in many of the fields so take particular care with dogs. Allow 3.5 hours.
Houghton Forest and Slindon Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.888504,-0.576779 Hey there. I'm TJ and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk. We're heading down to Houghton Forest for an 8.5 mile jaunt around the South Downs. Happy times with my wife! To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout. The forest and downs paths can all get very muddy so good boots are a must. You will need to negotiate some gates plus three stiles (with adjacent dog gaps) along the way. You will also be sharing some of the fields with sheep and dairy cattle so take particular care with dogs. The stiles and cattle are all encountered in the second half of the walk so, if you wish to avoid these, you can simply follow the outward leg both there and back. In this case you would only encounter simple wide bridle gates, so the route would be suitable for rugged disability buggies when the ground is firm enough. There are toilets in the car park at the start of the walk plus options for refreshments at the start point and also at the half-way point in Slindon village. Allow 4 hours plus extra time for stops and exploring Slindon village.
Shoreham-by-Sea and the Downs Link Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.834649,-0.271499 Hello there, I'm Claire and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk. I love exploring on foot with my husband, opening our eyes to things most people don't see and discovering our own special places together. This 7.5 mile walk takes in the lovely Adur Valley and then climbs into the South Downs. Is there anything more satisfying than getting some fresh air after a busy week? To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. The walk is flat for the first few miles, before a fairly stiff climb onto the South Downs and a gentle descent back into town. Half of the route is surfaced, but the paths through the downs and farms can be very muddy at times so good boots are a must. You will need to negotiate several gates, some steps and two stiles (both with gaps alongside for dogs to pass through). You will be sharing one of the pastures with cattle (although this stretch is on the South Downs Way so the livestock are used to walkers), one with sheep and one with horses. Small Dexter cattle are also used for conservation grazing in the nature reserve at some times of the year. Allow 3.5 hours.
Fishbourne and Bosham Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.838871,-0.814383 Hello! I'm Debbie and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk. It's a 6 mile loop taking in the meadows, mud flats, reed beds, farmland and quay around Fishbourne and Bosham, within the Chichester Harbour AONB. I count myself super lucky to live within an hour of the Sussex coast and it is just the place for a walk to recharge my batteries. To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. IMPORTANT NOTE: Spring high tides can flood some of the estuary paths so please check the Bosham tide times and time your walk to AVOID HIGH TIDES. The walk is virtually flat throughout with just a couple of very gentle slopes. The paths through the water meadows and fields can be very boggy and muddy so good boots are a must. Three of the fields you cross, the Fishbourne Meadows, are used to graze cattle so take particular care with dogs. You will need to negotiate a few steps, kissing gates and footbridges but there are no stiles on route. There are a couple of sections of walking on quiet lanes and you will need to cross an A-road a couple of times, so take care at these points. Allow 3 hours.
Worsbrough Country Park Circular Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.5289522,-1.4830251 A level easy walk suitable for all the family around a reservoir and country park. If you want to make a day of it, there are other attractions nearby. Wigfield Farm http://www.barnsley.ac.uk/facilities/wigfield-farm, has a wide collection of animals (sheep, ponies, donkeys and meerkats) and is open to the public to visit. Worsbrough Mill http://www.worsbrough-mill.com is a working stone mill that has regular open days to demonstrate the milling process. Stone ground products are also available to purchase. Most of the paths are gravel topped but there are areas that will have puddles in wet weather. Parking, both paid and free are nearby. The walk is level and is suitable for pushchairs. Toilets and refreshments are available at both Wigfield Farm and Worsbrough Mill.
Worthing Sea Front Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.818471,-0.375966 Hi, I'm Jo and this is my West Sussex Weekends walk, a jaunt around Worthing sea front. You simply can't beat the beach. Who can resist the sea air, big skies and the crunch of pebbles under foot? To read my full story visit www.west-sussex-weekends.com so I can tell you why I think you will love this walk and what highlights to expect. The West Sussex Weekends website is a great resource where you will also find ideas for places to stay, eat and drink plus plenty more inspirational stories to tempt you to explore more corners of West Sussex. The walking guide presented here is 4.5 miles in length, but as the bulk of the route is 'there and back' along the sea front, you can lengthen or shorten the walk to suit you. The walk is almost entirely flat, with just a gentle slope or two. The paths are all surfaced and there are no gates, stiles or steps to negotiate. The road crossings are all at designated pedestrian crossing points with traffic lights. Remember that the coast can be a very blustery place in winter, so wrap up warm. Allow 2.5 to 3 hours.
Hucking Estate Landscape Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.292173,0.648798 A 2.5 mile circular walk around Hucking Estate near Maidstone in Kent. Hucking Estate sits within the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is a beautiful mix of woodland and grassland. In spring and summer there is an abundance of wild flowers to enjoy, whilst autumn visitors will be greeted with an amazing show of autumn colours and all year round there are stunning views across the Weald of Kent. The woodland paths are all wide and well maintained but can be very muddy and slippery in the wetter months, so good boots are a must and wellingtons are recommended in the winter. There are a few gentle slopes throughout. You will need to negotiate a few kissing gates and staggered barriers, but there are no stiles. The grassland fields are used for grazing sheep so take care with dogs in these sections. There are several picnic benches within the woodland, but no other facilities. Allow 1.5 hours.
Fradley Junction and Alrewas Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.7242331,-1.7902193 A 5 mile circular walk from Fradley Junction in Staffordshire. This route explores the countryside which includes farmland and villages as well as sections along the Trent and Mersey Canal (at the start of the walk) and the Coventry Canal (towards the end). There is plenty of wildlife to see along the way. There is a canal visitor centre that is worth exploring, however it is run by volunteers and times of opening vary. At the junction there are several listed buildings, these are: Cottages, Warehouse, Crossover bridge and lock and on the Wharf you will find the original Stables, Carpenters shop and Blacksmiths (which now form part of the cafe and visitor centre). On the opposite side of the canal you will find the award winning Nature Reserve, this is well worth a look for all the family to enjoy. The route will take you along a mixture of tarmac surfaces, towpaths and footpaths across farmers fields. Some of the fields are likely to be holding horses and sheep so take particular care with dogs. Parts of the route can be muddy, depending on the time of year. You will need to negotiate a few kissing gates plus six stiles. Approximate time 2.5 hours.
Fradley Junction and Riley Hill Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.7243257,-1.7904806 A 7 mile circular walk from Fradley Junction in Staffordshire. This route explores the countryside which includes farmland and villages as well as sections along the Trent and Mersey Canal at the start of the walk and at the end. There is plenty of wildlife to see along the way. There is a canal visitor centre that is worth exploring however it is run by volunteers and times of opening vary. At the junction there are several listed buildings, these are: Cottages, Warehouse, Crossover bridge and lock and on the Wharf you will find the original Stables, Carpenters shop and Blacksmiths (which now form part of the cafe and visitor centre). On the opposite side of the canal you will find the award winning Nature Reserve, this is well worth a look for all the family to enjoy. The route will take you along a mixture of tarmac surfaces, towpaths and footpaths across farmers fields. At least one of the fields may be holding cattle so take particular care with dogs. Parts of the route can be muddy, depending on the time of year. You will need to negotiate a few metal gates. There are several long stretches of road walking with no pavements so take care of traffic. Approximate time 3 hours.
Sussex Hospices Trail Part 5: Shoreham-by-Sea to Brighton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 50.834571,-0.271149 IMPORTANT NOTE: In order to avoid the noise, inconvenience and safety risks presented by the heavy shipping and lorry traffic using Shoreham Port, we recommend undertaking this walk on a SUNDAY when the port area is relatively quiet. A 7 mile linear walk from Shoreham-by-Sea rail station to Brighton rail station, forming the fifth stretch of the Sussex Hospices Trail. The route follows the south coast for the most part and, whilst it might sound like a cliche, this really is a walk of two halves which showcases the impact first of industry and then of recreation on our coast. The first part follows the residential streets of Shoreham-by-Sea, passing a pretty 11th century church along the way, to reach the busy Shoreham Port, an impressive industrial site. Later, the industrial buildings give way to the seafront promenades of Hove and Brighton, bustling with visitors and peppered with bright beach huts and seaside attractions. The return journey can be completed with a single 15 minute train journey. The hospices of Sussex are dedicated to providing specialist end-of-life care. Friends of Sussex Hospices has worked with partners and supporters to create the Sussex Hospices Trail, a 200 mile long-distance path to support and raise awareness of the twelve hospice care providers that serve the adults and children of Sussex. The walking route from Shoreham-by-Sea to Brighton is almost entirely flat, with just one slope up to Brighton rail station at the end. The walk follows tarmac pavements and walkways and there are no gates, stiles or flights of steps on route. As such, the route is suitable for pushchairs and disability buggies. You will need to negotiate the footbridges over the locks at Shoreham Port, these have ramps and are fairly generous in width but do take particular care with children and dogs. Public toilets and refreshments are available at several points along the seafront. Allow 3.5 hours.
The Spa Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.194884,-0.120151 A 7 mile ‘there and back' walk along the mid section of the old Horncastle to Woodhall Junction railway line in Lincolnshire, known as the Spa Trail. The trail, part of the Viking Way long distance path, passes through a mix of woodland and open countryside. Along the way you will discover impressive sculptures made from wood, stone and metal, all reflecting local wildlife and links with the past. The full walk is 7 miles but, as it follows the same route for the out and return legs, you can shorten it to any length you would like. The trail is a flat surfaced path with no stiles, gates or other obstacles, making it ideal for wheelchairs, pushchairs and disability buggies. The route is a bridleway and so you will be sharing the trail with cyclists and horse riders. The path is fenced for the entire route and dog waste bins are provided at intervals. The stone surface is very firm, but there can be a shallow amount of mud and leaf litter in the autumn and winter months. There are no toilets or other facilities along the trail. Approximate time 3 to 3.5 hours.
Anton Lakes Family Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.2182245,-1.4893148 An ideal family short walk (just one mile in length) which takes in Anton Lakes nature reserve. If you are walking with children, there is also a children's playground on route (shortly after leaving the car park). Designated as a Local Nature Reserve in 1996 Anton Lakes is situated just north of Andover town centre. The reserve is made up of a range of habitats following its use for gravel extraction. The River Anton rises from springs within the reserve, flowing down through a series of old watercress beds, providing a habitat for the locally rare long-stalked yellow sedge. The river then flows into the lakes, which are themselves home to a variety of birds including the beautiful great-crested grebe. Other habitats include an area of chalk grassland providing an ideal habitat for a variety of butterfly species such as the marbled white and gatekeeper and an area of wet, fen meadow plays host to an impressive colony of southern marsh orchids. Although more difficult to find, otters and water voles also use the site. The walking route follows a simple surfaced path around the lake, making it a simple and easy to navigate route. You will need to negotiate a couple of wooden bridges and a single metal gate. Approximate time 30 minutes.
Shinfield Meadows Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.413922,-0.936416 A 2 mile circular walk from Shinfield Grange in the Berkshire village of Shinfield taking in quiet farm tracks, wet meadows and local farmland with a short stretch alongside the meandering River Loddon. The surrounding countryside has retained much of its charm with traditional hedgerows and mature oaks and whatever the time of year you are pretty much guaranteed to spot red kites circling above or eyeing you from a tree. This walk is definitely one for waterproof shoes or wellies. A third of the walk is footpath and farm track that are both extremely muddy during the winter months and the remaining part of the walk takes you through meadows which are liable to flood in winter but can be boggy nearly all year round. If the River Loddon over tops, it would be too dangerous to undertake the walk and you will need to retrace your steps back to the start. The walk negotiates a number of stiles and kissing gates and you will also be sharing many of the fields with sheep or cattle, so take care with dogs (farmers warning signs are in place). There are no amenities on route but these can be found within the local nearby village. Approximate time 45 minutes.
Bold Venture Park and Darwen Tower Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.690209150579,-2.4753558589372 A short walk from Bold Venture Park to Jubilee Tower on Darwen Moors. Jubilee Tower was built around 1896 to commemorate Queen Victoria's Jubilee year. More recently the tower lost its dome in high winds, but this was eventually replaced. You can climb the tower and on a clear day you can see for miles in all directions. This is a fairly easy walk in terms of navigation (it is difficult to get lost), but there are a couple of steep sections which can be slippery so these need care. The path surfaces are generally very good. There is one gate to negotiate. Approximate time 1.5 hours.
Around the Scarborough Headland Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.287967283882,-0.39736741152752 A 2 mile circular walk around the Scarborough Headland. The walk starts on the car parking area alongside the North Bay before climbing up to towards the castle and then descending down the other side of the hill into the South Bay. The walk passes near Richard III house, before skirting the headland along Marine Drive which takes the walker back to the start. The walk has several steep climbs and descents, but all the pavements are in good order. There are no gates, steps or stiles. Allow 1.5 hours.
Flamborough to North Landing Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.116154,-0.082622 A 5 mile 'there and back' walk taking in the Flamborough Lighthouse and weather station, the arrow-shaped headland and a walk to North Landing, after optionally visiting the small beach at Flamborough (tide permitting). There are excellent coastal and countryside views on offer, and a very photogenic lighthouse. The walk has several steep climbs and descents, some with steps. Most of the paths are grass tracks and moorland style paths, so may be muddy after heavy rains. Caution is suggested if it is particularly windy as there is no shelter from the wind. The cliff top path is also used a by cyclists.
Walsall Arboretum Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 52.582735,-1.9587101 A 2 mile circular walk around Walsall Arboretum. This route explores the arboretum which includes open parkland, picnic areas, play areas and Hatherton Lake. There is plenty of wildlife to see on the lake and in the surrounding woodland. There is also a visitor centre that is worth exploring, it also includes a cafe. The route will take you along a mixture of tarmac surfaces and footpaths, parts of the route can be muddy, depending on the time of year. Approximate time 1 hour.
Staithes and Cowbar Nab Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.555917,-0.793805 A 2 mile walk around the picturesque village of Staithes. The walk starts above the village in the car park before descending into Staithes and having a good look around. There is an option to climb up onto Cowbar Nab before walking out to the harbour. The walk returns through Staithes.The walk affords excellent coastal and countryside views and, if the option of climbing up to Cowbar Nab is taken, stunning views of Staithes from above. The walk has several steep climbs and descents, with steps and bridges. Most of it is on paved roads and pavements, but Cowbar Nab is an unmade footpath and caution is suggested if climbing this landmark as the cliff edges are very exposed and steep. The Nab is accessed by a stile. A difficulty rating of 4/5 is given because of the nature of Cowbar Nab.
The Old Plough and Oxshott Heath Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.320695,-0.386499 A 4 mile pub walk from The Old Plough in Stoke D'Abernon, near Cobham in Surrey. The Old Plough is a 300 year old building, once a court house, which today is home to a smart community pub where eaters and drinkers alike (along with their canine companions) are looked after with friendly and professional service. The walking route heads out on the footpaths alongside Knowle Hill Park and Littleheath Common Ponds to explore the nearby Oxshott Heath, a beautiful woodland, heath and common which is popular with families, dog walkers and horse riders. The walk has a few gentle slopes, with just one short steeper section within Oxshott Heath. The paths are unmade and can be muddy and slippery in winter and after periods of rain, so good boots are a must. You will need to negotiate a few kissing gates, some steps plus two stiles (both of which have very large gaps alongside for dogs to pass through). The majority of the paths are enclosed, but you may be sharing one field with horses. You will need to cross the railway at an unsignalled crossing so take particular care at this point. Approximate time 2 hours.
Shotover Country Park Boundary Patrol Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.751654,-1.184595 A circular walk of just more than 3 miles, around the footpaths in Shotover Country Park right on the edge of Oxford. Covering 289 acres, the country park sits on the southern slopes of Shotover Hill. There are spectacular views across south Oxfordshire from the top and the waymarked walking route explores the mosaic of hidden valleys, woodland, ponds, fields and grassland with lots of wildlife to enjoy. Some of the paths are surfaced, but the vast majority of the route follows unmade paths through shaded woodland and grassland (even crossing some springs) meaning they can be muddy throughout the year – boots or wellies are recommended. There are several climbs and descents throughout (take care as the steeper slopes can be slippery) and you will need to negotiate some steps, gates and squeeze gaps, but there are no stiles on route. Dogs are welcome in the park and dog waste bins are provided near the start of the walk. There are no toilets or other facilities within the park. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours, depending on conditions underfoot.
Explore Surrey: Godstone Paths, Ponds and Churches Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.247275,-0.066412 A 6.5km (4 mile) circular walk from the pretty village of Godstone in Surrey, taking you on a simple loop through the surrounding fields and lanes via old mills and the adjacent village of Tandridge. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has just a few gentle slopes throughout, with a couple of short steeper parts. Many of the bridleways and paths across fields and through woodland can get very muddy so good boots are a must (or wellingtons with grips in the winter). One of the fields you cross is likely to be holding (inquisitive!) horses. You will need to negotiate a few kissing gates, some steps plus two stiles (which have open fencing alongside for dogs to pass through). If you wish, you can easily avoid both stiles and the horses by re-tracing your steps along part of the outward leg to return to Godstone. You will need to cross the A22 at one point (the visibility is good but the road can be busy with fast moving traffic) and there are a couple of short sections on quiet country lanes, so take particular care at these points. Allow 2 hours. There are many options for refreshments, either at the start or end of the walk at Godstone's many pubs and cafes or at the pub in Tandridge about half way round. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill and Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Friday Street Hammer Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.19992,-0.390123 A 10km (6 mile) circular walk from Friday Street, near Dorking in Surrey, taking in the Wotton Estate with great views plus rivers, hammer ponds, mills, farms and churches to enjoy along the way. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has gentle climbs and descents throughout. Many of the bridleways and paths can get very muddy and slippery so good boots are a must (or wellingtons with grips in the winter).Whilst most of the paths are enclosed, you will need to cross a couple of pastures that may be holding livestock at some times of year (including cattle) so take particular care with dogs. You will need to negotiate some steps, several kissing gates plus four stiles (which have surrounds with gaps for medium dogs to fit through – our standard poodle just squeezed through, but larger dogs would need a lift over). There are a couple of road crossings of the A25 plus some short stretches of walking on a quiet country lanes, so take care of traffic at these points. Allow 3 hours. There are several options for refreshments on the walk, with many pubs on the route. The Stephen Langton Inn is near the Friday Street car park at the start of the walk, the Wotton Hatch is on the A25 between Waypoints 2 and 3 and the Abinger Hatch is opposite the church at Waypoint 7. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill and Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Godalming and Hydon's Ball Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.186529,-0.618587 IMPORTANT NOTE: THE FOOTPATH AT BUSBRIDGE LAKES IS CURRENTLY CLOSED FOR REPAIR SO THIS WALK IS NOT PASSABLE. WE WILL REMOVE THIS NOTE ONCE THE PATH IS REPAIRED AND THE WALK IS OPEN. A 14.5km (9 mile) circular walk (which can be shortened to 7 miles) from Godalming Station in Surrey, taking in the woodlands, lakes and old lanes to the south of the town, including a climb to the top of Hydon's Ball where you will be rewarded with magnificent views. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has several climbs and descents including a couple of very steep sections. There are no stiles or gates on route but you will need to negotiate several flights of steps. All of the paths are enclosed, so you will not encounter any livestock. The bridleways and paths are very rutted and uneven in many places and can also get very muddy, so good boots are a must (or wellingtons with grips in the wet winter months). There are a couple of sections of walking along country lanes so take care of traffic at these points. The route also takes you across a golf course, so please show respect for the golfers by allowing them to take their shots before you cross and watch out for any stray golf balls. If the full 9 mile walk is too long for you, you can shorten the walk to around 7 miles by finishing at Milford Station and then returning to Godalming by train. Allow 4.5 to 5 hours. Godalming itself has many options for refreshments at the start or end of the walk, but there are no facilities along the rest of the route. You may like to stock up with supplies in Godalming and then enjoy a picnic on the top of Hydon's Ball where there is a stone seat. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 145 Guildford & Farnham. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Godalming and Eashing Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.186864,-0.618425 A 6.5km (4 mile) circular walk from Godalming Station in Surrey, exploring the valley of the River Wey west of the town including the medieval stone bridge in Eashing. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has a few gentle climbs and descents throughout. It follows unmade bridleways and paths for the most part, which can be very uneven underfoot and can also get very muddy at times so good boots are a must (or wellingtons with grips in the wet winter months). You will need to negotiate several boardwalks, some steps, a gate, some staggered barriers and two stiles (which are enclosed with tight fencing so dogs may need a lift over). There is a section of about 500 metres along the edge of a fairly busy road, so the walk is not recommended for young children and you will need to take great care in this section. One of the fields you cross may be holding cattle so take care with dogs. Allow 1.5 to 2 hours. Godalming itself has many options for refreshments at the start or end of the walk, or you will find The Stag pub about half way around the route in Eashing. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 145 Guildford & Farnham. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Southport Pier, Sea Front and Marine Lake Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 53.6501,-3.0065 A 5 mile walk around the Marine Lake and Gardens in Southport, taking in the Pier and Marine Bridge. The walk affords excellent coastal and town views. The walk is completely flat and is on tarmac paths the whole way. There are a four road crossings, two being traffic light controlled. Paid toilets are located on Promenade, or you can usually find free toilets in one of the many department stores or supermarkets located nearby.
Whitby Lighthouses Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 54.4868,-0.6137 A 4 mile walk around Whitby, taking in the two piers, the beach (tide permitting) and the Captain Cook Monument.The walk affords excellent coastal and town views. The walk is mostly flat, but there are several steep climbs and descents, with steps. There is also a beach section (tide permitting). Tide tables MUST be consulted to ensure the tide will be going out whilst you are on the beach. Care must also be taken on the second of the two piers as there are no barriers at the edges of the pier, and it is unwise to venture out onto this should the tide be coming in (especially in bad weather).
Explore Surrey: Staffhurst Wood Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.220641,0.018062 A 3km (2 mile) circular walk exploring Staffhurst Wood (near Limpsfield), a beautiful old woodland which is popular with families and dog walkers and which bursts into a glorious display of bluebells in the late spring. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk is relatively flat with just a couple of gentle slopes. The paths can get very muddy and slippery at times so good boots are a must (or wellingtons in the wetter months). When the paths are dry and firmer, it would be possible to take a rugged pushchair or disability buggy around the route, assuming this would manage the obstacles (described here and with photos in the gallery). There are no stiles or kissing gates, but you will need to negotiate a few staggered barriers and a couple of sleeper bridges (the narrowest of which is about 53cm wide). The staggered barriers are tight to manoeuvre around, but they are open and tall (about 1.1m tall) so it would be possible to push a pushchair straight through the barrier instead. Allow 1 to 1.5 hours depending on conditions underfoot. There are no refreshments, toilets or other facilities on the route. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 147 Sevenoaks and Tonbridge. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Runnymede Memorial Trail Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.437015,-0.56871 A 7km (4.5 mile) circular walk from Cooper's Hill in Englefield Green taking in the Runnymede meadows, a stretch of the River Thames and visiting three beautiful memorials along the way, the John F Kennedy Memorial, the Magna Carta Memorial and the Air Forces Memorial. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout. The majority of the paths are unsurfaced and so can get very muddy at times and the route also crosses some water meadows which can have standing water, so good boots are a must and wellingtons will be needed in the wetter months. There are no stiles on route, but you will need to negotiate some kissing gates and some steps. There are a few road crossings that need particular care. A couple of the fields may be holding livestock so take care with dogs. The Air Forces Memorial is closed on Christmas Day and New Year's Day. Approximate time 3 hours (in order to allow enough time to explore the memorials). There are public toilets alongside the car park at the start of the walk, and in the summer months there is a refreshment chalet alongside the River Thames. If you are looking for refreshments after your walk, you will find many pubs, restaurants and cafes in Englefield Green. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 160 Windsor, Weybridge and Bracknell. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Discover Gatton Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.256212,-0.191321 A 3.5km (2 mile) circular easy-access walk around Gatton Park in Surrey, a beautiful area of parkland designed by Lancelot Capability Brown, giving you a glimpse into its diverse history. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. Gatton Park is very popular so arrive early on peak days otherwise you may find the car park full. The walk has several slopes throughout, including a couple of quite steep sections. Most of the route follows stone tracks but the sections of path through woodland can be muddy and slippery in places, particularly in wet weather. There are no stiles, steps or kissing gates on route, but you will need to negotiate some staggered barrier gaps alongside vehicle gates (which are approximately 1 metre wide). As such, it would be probably be possible to take a rugged pushchair or disability buggy around the route, assuming you can handle the steep sections. Dogs are welcome in Gatton Park, please keep them on leads for the short sections where advised, as sheep are often grazing in the adjacent parkland. Approximate time 1 to 1.5 hours. There are toilets and a popular cafe kiosk (the Urban Kitchen) in the car park at the start of the walk. Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 146 Dorking, Box Hill and Reigate. This walk follows public footpaths and bridleways which cross private and public land. Information is included for your interest, but please respect people's privacy, keep dogs under control and remember the Countryside Code.
Explore Surrey: Hogsmill River Trail Part One Walking Guide iFootpath Walking Guides 51.349991,-0.256651 A 7km (4.5 mile linear) walk from Ewell West rail station to Malden Manor rail station, following the course of the Hogsmill River and part of the London Loop long distance path. This walk is part of the Explore Surrey collection, published through a collaboration between iFootpath and Surrey County Council. The walk is relatively flat, with just a couple of gentle slopes along the way. Whilst some of the paths are surfaced, several long stretches of the riverside route follow dirt paths and grass banks which can get very muddy, so good boots are a must. If you would like a longer walk, this route can be combined with Hogsmill River Trail Part Two, making a walk of 9 miles. If 4.5 miles is too much for you, the walk can be shortened to 2.5 miles by finishing at the bus stops on Kingston Road. There are no stiles or kissing gates, but the second half of the route (after Kingston Road) follows very narrow paths (meaning this stretch would not be suitable for a pushchair or disability buggy). Approximate time 2 hours. There are toilets at Ewe